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More Babbler shuffling!

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Old Wednesday 17th October 2018, 06:42   #26
LeNomenclatoriste
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I make you a short summary

SYLVIIDAE:
Two recognized genera : Sylvia and Curruca. Parophasma and Lioptilus are synonyms of Sylvia

PARADOXORNITHIDAE:
Psittiparus, Conostoma, Cholornis --> Paradoxornis (I didn't follow this recommendation, I kept Conostoma, Cholornis and Psittiparus and placed Paradoxornis heudei in Calamornis); Neosuthora, Chleuasicus, Sinosuthora -->Suthora (same remark, I kept the current genera)

ZOSTEROPIDAE:
Parayuhina gen. nov. for ''Yuhina'' diademata, Parayuhina diademata comb. nov.;
Yuhina torqueola, castaniceps and everetti --> Staphida
Some unsampled genera such as Rukia, Megazosterops or the type species of Heleia (Heleia muelleri) are not included and remain uncertain. I temporally placed Heleia in synonymy with Apalopteron pending further studies

Quote:
Parayuhina gen. nov.
Type species: Parayuhina diademata (Verreaux, 1869) comb. nov.
Diagnosis : 14–18 cm in length, 15–29 g; mostly greyish-brown plumage with a darker brown erectable crest, prominent white supercilium/nuchal collar from above the eye across the nape, contrastingly blackish basal parts of primaries and secondaries, and white underwing-coverts; shallowly forked tail; and pale yellowish/orange legs. Differs from Staphida in lacking broad white tips to the outer tail feathers, and from Yuhina by its larger size, slightly forked tail and absence of streaks on head or flanks. Sexes similar.
Etymology : This feminine name is based on the name previously used for a group of crested
babblers, Yuhina, that proved to be paraphyletic based on phylogenetic results. This name was
itself based on the Nepalese word for these birds, “Yuhin” (Richmond, 1992). We add the prefix
Para, from Ancient Greek παρά “near”, to remind the fact that this taxon does not form a monophyletic group with the other yuhinas.
Remarks: A monospecific genus. Occurs in forested mountainous areas of central and south
China, north-east Myanmar and north Vietnam.
TIMALIIDAE:
Rhopocichla-->Dumetia under the name Dumetia atriceps. I kept Rhopocichla as distinct genus. Garrulax calvus and Garrulax lugubris are members of family Timaliidae, thus Melanocichla is restored.

PELLORNEIDAE:
Trichastoma and Pellorneum albiventre -->Pellorneum (tentative)
Quote:
Pellorneum Swainson, 1832, as currently defined, is also polyphyletic. Because the type species (ruficeps) forms a clade with P. capistratum, one option could be to move the species albiventre to the genus Trichastoma Blyth, 1842. However, the limits between these two closely related genera have often been debated (Deignan, 1964; Delacour, 1946), and several species have not been sampled yet in genetic studies (Pellorneum nigrocapitatum, P. fuscocapillus, P. palustre and Trichastoma buettikoferi). Although the divergence between the two genera is older than 10 Ma, we suggest to merge all species within the senior name Pellorneum, in agrement with Eaton et al. (2016). This group would then unite all species with similar ground-foraging ecology and adaptations
They propose to merge Rimator within Napothera despite their distinctiveness (I didn't follow this suggestion).

ALCIPPEIDAE fam. nov. New family including only the genus Alcippe

LEIOTHRICHIDAE:
Siva, Sibia and Chrysominla --> Actinodura (Despite their close relationship, I kept these four genera).
Chatarrhaea, ''Garrulax'' cinereifrons --> Argya. Argya is split from Turdoides.
Acanthoptila nipalensis, Phyllanthus and Kupeornis --> Turdoides. I kept Acanthoptila and Phyllanthus as distinct genera but placed Kupeornis in synonymy within Phyllanthus
Pterorhinus is restored to include several species previously classified in the genera Garrulax, Dryonastes, Babax .....

Last edited by LeNomenclatoriste : Wednesday 17th October 2018 at 06:57.
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Old Friday 19th October 2018, 13:03   #27
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Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste View Post
I make you a short summary
Merci!
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Old Friday 19th October 2018, 14:29   #28
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For my personal list I prefer three genera in Sylviidae:
Sylvia, Curruca and Melizophilus
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Old Friday 19th October 2018, 14:33   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acanthis View Post
For my personal list I prefer three genera in Sylviidae:
Sylvia, Curruca and Melizophilus

You also have a personal list of birds?
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Old Tuesday 23rd October 2018, 01:49   #30
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You also have a personal list of birds?
Oui, but in a increasingly fluid state.
Scratch the previous comment re. Sylviidae. That was my preference until I started 'playing catch-up' especially in the areas of "temporal banding". Interesting times ahead

Looking at the Leiothrichidae tree it's difficult to resist the urge to chip away at the remainder of the larger laughingthrush genera eg. Strophocincla for some of the plainer species currently in Trochalopteron?
I like the names you created for certain laughingthrush clades on another thread (I wont quote them and ruin the googlewhack ) and have used some in my notes.

Re. the three species of 'laughingthrush' relocated elsewhere. I imagine these should probably be renamed 'babbler'
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Old Tuesday 23rd October 2018, 06:21   #31
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Originally Posted by Acanthis View Post

Looking at the Leiothrichidae tree it's difficult to resist the urge to chip away at the remainder of the larger laughingthrush genera eg. Strophocincla for some of the plainer species currently in Trochalopteron?
If you want to separate the genus in two (that's what I did, personally), use Pterocyclus instead of Strophocincla . For me, the genus Trochalopteron consists of the following species:

Trochalopteron austeni Godwin-Austen, 1870
Trochalopteron imbricatum (Blyth, 1843)
Trochalopteron lineatum (Vigors, 1831)
Trochalopteron squamatum (Gould, 1835)
Trochalopteron subunicolor Blyth, 1843
Trochalopteron virgatum Godwin-Austen, 1874

The remaining becomes Pterocyclus .

Quote:
I like the names you created for certain laughingthrush clades on another thread (I wont quote them and ruin the googlewhack ) and have used some in my notes.
Spodiocara [literally grey head] (for Argya cinereifrons), Daphoenocichla [red thrush] (as a subgenus of Liocichla, but I realized that it was useless), and Leucocrotapha [white temple] (as a new genus for ''Yuhina'' diademata, now Parayuhina)

Parayuhina, Paragallinula, Paraclaravis, it's an overdose of Para-something

The three species of Dasycrotapha have nothing in common, plateni and pygmaea merit their own genus (''Ixocerthia")

Quote:
Re. the three species of 'laughingthrush' relocated elsewhere. I imagine these should probably be renamed 'babbler'
which?
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Old Wednesday 24th October 2018, 02:13   #32
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If you want to separate the genus in two (that's what I did, personally), use Pterocyclus...
Oh yes, I'd forgot about Pterocyclus. That's three genera for me then


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Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste View Post
Spodiocara [literally grey head] (for Argya cinereifrons), Daphoenocichla [red thrush]...
Aha, not those but they work just as well!

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Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste View Post
which?
Garrulax lugubris & calvus - Whoopingthrushes might be a better name

And Garrulax cinereifrons (Malcolmia, Spodiocara, Pseudargya or Spodiocichla?)
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Last edited by Acanthis : Wednesday 24th October 2018 at 02:14. Reason: Italics
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Old Wednesday 24th October 2018, 03:05   #33
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And Garrulax cinereifrons (Malcolmia, Spodiocara, Pseudargya or Spodiocichla?)
Oh, indeed, I had forgotten them. Only Malcolmia is a real genus.

Last edited by LeNomenclatoriste : Wednesday 24th October 2018 at 05:22.
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Old Thursday 25th October 2018, 07:56   #34
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TiF Update October 24

I've made many changes in the babbler clade based on the recent paper by Cai et al. (2018). Most of the changes have been minor. Nonetheless, there have been changes to Sylviidae, Paradoxornithidae, Timaliidae, Pellorneidae, Alcippeidae, and Leiothrichidae. Zosteropidae will be affected too, but things are more complex there and with one exception will wait for a later update.

The following changes deserve mention:

The Abyssinian Catbird, Parophasma galinieri, becomes Sylvia galinieri. (Sylviidae)
Atraphornis and Melizophilus have been separated from Curruca. (Sylviidae)
The Reed Parrotbill, Paradoxornis heudei, becomes Calamornis heudei. (Paradoxornithidae)
Cholornis has been merged into Conostoma. (Paradoxornithidae)
Neosuthora has been merged into Suthora. (Paradoxornithidae)
Sinosuthora has been merged into Chleuasicus. (Paradoxornithidae)
The White-collared Yuhina, "Yuhina" diademata, becomes Parayuhina diademata. (Zosteropidae)
Trichastoma has been resplit from Pellorneum. (Pellorneidae)
I was previously doubtful about where the two species of Melanocichla belonged, but not nearly doubtful enough. Melanocichla has been moved to Timaliidae from Leiothrichidae. (Leiothrichidae)
Malcolmia, Chatarrhaea, and Malacocircus are subsumed in Argya. (Leiothrichidae)
Kupeornis has been merged into Phyllanthus. (Leiothrichidae)
Stactocichla merged into Leucodioptron. (Leiothrichidae)
[Sylvioidea III, 3.08]

I'm not opposed to split Adophoneus (type: Sylvia nisoria), Adornis (type: Motacilla hortensis ) and Parisoma (type: Sylvia subcaerulea) from Curruca

I kept Cholornis and Neosuthora as distinct genera, but merged Sinosuthora into Chleuasicus

Following Boyd, I've split Trichastoma from Pellorneum , but placed malaccense and cinereiceps in Anuropsis

Many of his change look similar to mine.

Last edited by LeNomenclatoriste : Thursday 25th October 2018 at 15:00.
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Old Sunday 28th October 2018, 13:46   #35
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Should we not use Hemirhynchus Hodgson, 1843 instead of Cholornis Verreaux, 1871 ?
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Old Sunday 28th October 2018, 15:05   #36
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Should we not use Hemirhynchus Hodgson, 1843 instead of Cholornis Verreaux, 1871 ?
I believe Hemirhynchus Hodgson, 1843 is a synonym of Suthora Hodgson 1837, with S. nipalensis as the type.
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Old Sunday 28th October 2018, 15:58   #37
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Ah ! yes, indeed, you're right. There was a correction.
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Old Tuesday 13th November 2018, 04:19   #38
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Two new mitogenomes of Pellorneidae and a phylogeny of the superfamily Sylvioidea

Two new mitogenomes of Pellorneidae (Aves: Passeriformes) and a phylogeny of the superfamily Sylvioidea

Zuhao Huang, Feiyun Tu , Shan Tang

Australian Journal of Zoology

Abstract

The superfamily Sylvioidea contains the most diversified species within the Passerida. Grey-cheeked Fulvetta Alcippe morrisonia and Eyebrowed Wren-babbler Napothera epilepidota are special birds with a weak flight and live in lightly wooded or scrubland environments. In the present study, two new mitogenomes of A. morrisonia (KX376475) and N. epilepidota (KX831093) within the superfamily Sylvioidea were sequenced and their total lengths were 17,788 bp and 17,913 bp, respectively. Both mitogenomes comprised 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and two control regions (CR and CCR). Similar to most metazoans, both mitogenomes and their protein-coding genes encoded on the H-strand displayed typical positive AT skews and negative GC skews. Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses were conducted based on partitioned data of mitogenomes and two identical topologies were observed. The family-level phylogenetic relationships ((((Pellorneidae, Leiothrichidae) Timaliidae) Zosteropidae) Sylviidae) among the superfamily Sylvioidea, were strongly supported. Within the family Pellorneidae, A. morrisonia clustered with N. epilepidota. Within Leiothrichidae, we further demonstrated that Babax lanceolatus was sister to Garrulax perspicillatus, and Spizixos semitorques was nested in the genus Pycnonotus based on mitogenomic data and we proposed that the generic placement of Spizixos should be reconsidered.

Accepted 11 October 2018
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Old Tuesday 13th November 2018, 07:03   #39
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Spizixos semitorques was nested in the genus Pycnonotus based on mitogenomic data and we proposed that the generic placement of Spizixos should be reconsidered.
I look forward to seeing if the result is similar to Shakya and al.(2017) and Fuchs and al. (2018)
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Old Wednesday 14th November 2018, 14:25   #40
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Within Leiothrichidae, we further demonstrated that Babax lanceolatus was sister to Garrulax perspicillatus, and Spizixos semitorques was nested in the genus Pycnonotus based on mitogenomic data and we proposed that the generic placement of Spizixos should be reconsidered.

Accepted 11 October 2018
!!! How on Earth did two bulbul genera end up placed in Leiothrichidae?

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I look forward to seeing if the result is similar to Shakya and al.(2017) and Fuchs and al. (2018)
Me too!
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Old Thursday 15th November 2018, 02:04   #41
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Good stuff, the Black/Bare-headed 'Laughingthrush' must be the biggest surprise!
Black Scimitar Babbler and Bare-headed Scimitar Babbler - totally awesome. Bill, tail, feeding habits, habitat of Black, mixed-flock feeding behaviour and especially the calls all make sense for this placement - really great stuff reading this!
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Old Thursday 15th November 2018, 12:53   #42
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Great. It looks that the result will be enthusiastic shuffling and changing of scientific and common names.

As the result, many publications will be useless, because of uncertainity what species they refer to. Matching species between old, new and intermediate names in different publications will be nightmare. And this is not a definite final situation yet.

It looks like scientific names of birds lost the reason of existence: unchanging, reliable identifiers of animals. Perhaps time to introduce a taxonomy-free identifier of species, maybe a number?
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Old Tuesday 6th August 2019, 05:26   #43
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Pnoepygidae

TiF Update August 5:

Pnoepygidae is now referred to as the Cupwing family. The English last names have been changed to reflect this.
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Old Friday 23rd August 2019, 16:55   #44
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For my personal list I prefer three genera in Sylviidae:
Sylvia, Curruca and Melizophilus
But not Atraphornis ?

http://jboyd.net/Taxo/List23.html#sylviidae
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 15:24   #45
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Zuccon et al. (2020). Type specimens matter: new insights on the systematics, taxonomy and nomenclature of the subalpine warbler (Sylvia cantillans) complex

https://academic.oup.com/zoolinnean/...dFrom=fulltext

Abstract
We revise the taxonomy of the Sylvia cantillans complex, a group of phenotypically distinct warblers with mainly parapatric distributions around a large part of the Mediterranean basin. We redefine the species limits using a combination of mitochondrial and nuclear markers and we objectively link available names to the genetically defined lineages by genotyping the surviving type specimens. In addition, the study of archival documents clarifies the exact composition of type series and provides further evidence for the identification of lost types. These results support the recognition of three species-level taxa: Moltoni’s warbler, Sylvia subalpina (north-central Italy, Corsica, Sardinia and the Balearics); the western subalpine warbler, S. iberiae (North Africa, Iberia, southern France and extreme north-west Italy); and the eastern subalpine warbler, S. cantillans, with subspecies S. cantillans cantillans (southern Italy, Sicily) and S. cantillans albistriata (Balkans, Greece, western Turkey).

I guess their French vernacular names will be applied like this :

Sylvia iberiae - Fauvette passerinette
Sylvia cantillans - Fauvette des Balkans
Sylvia subalpina - Fauvette de Moltoni

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Old Wednesday 29th April 2020, 12:53   #46
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Tianlong Cai, Shimiao Shao, Jonathan D. Kennedy, Per Alström, Robert G. Moyle, Yanhua Qu, Fumin Lei & Jon Fjeldså. The role of evolutionary time, diversification rates and dispersal in determining the global diversity of a large radiation of passerine birds. Journal of Biogeography. First Published: 24 April 2020 https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13823

Abstract:

Aim
Variation in species diversity among different geographical areas may result from differences in speciation and extinction rates, immigration and time for diversification. An area with high species diversity may be the result of a high net diversification rate, multiple immigration events from adjacent regions, and a long time available for the accumulation of species (known as the ‘time‐for‐speciation effect’). Here, we examine the relative importance of the three aforementioned processes in shaping the geographical diversity patterns of a large radiation of passerine birds.

Location
Global.

Taxon
Babblers (Aves: Passeriformes).

Methods
Using a comprehensive phylogeny of extant species (~90% sampled) and distributions of the world's babblers, we reconstructed their biogeographical history and analysed the diversification dynamics. We examined how species richness correlates with the timing of regional colonization, the number of immigration events and the rate of speciation within all 13 geographical distribution regions.

Results
We found that babblers likely originated in the Sino‐Himalayan Mountains (SHM) in the early Miocene, suggesting a long time for diversification and species accumulation within the SHM. Regression analyses showed the regional diversity of babblers can be well explained by the timing of the first colonization within of these areas, while differences in rates of speciation or immigration have far weaker effects. Nonetheless, the rapid speciation of Zosterops during the Pleistocene has accounted for the increased diversification and accumulation of species in the oceanic islands.

Main Conclusions
Our results suggest that the global diversity patterns of babblers have predominantly been shaped by the time‐for‐speciation effect. Our findings also support an origin centred in tropical and subtropical parts of the SHM, with a cradle of recent diversification in the oceanic islands of the Indo‐Pacific and Indian Ocean regions, which provides new insights into the generation of global biodiversity hotspots.
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Old Tuesday 30th June 2020, 19:44   #47
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Tianlong Cai, Alice Cibois, Per Alström, Robert G. Moyle, Jonathan D. Kennedy, Shimiao Shao, Ruiying Zhang, Martin Irestedt, Per G.P. Ericson, Magnus Gelang, Yanhua Qu, Fumin Lei, Jon Fjeldså. Near-complete phylogeny and taxonomic revision of the world’s babbler (Aves: Passeriformes). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 12 October 2018.
IOC Updates Diary June 29

Recognize Paradoxornithidae as a family separate from Sylviidae and revise sequence and genera within that family Cai et al. (2019) and modified by Penhallurick & Robson (2009). In addition to the parrotbill genera, Paradoxornithidae also includes: Myzornis, Moupinia, Lioparus, Chrysomma, Rhopophilus, Fulvetta, and Chamaea.

Revise sequence and genera in Sylviidae based primarily on Cai et al. (2019)
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Old Thursday 30th July 2020, 10:37   #48
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IOC Updates Diary June 29

Revise sequence and genera in Sylviidae based primarily on Cai et al. (2019)

Are the genetic and temporal divergence of the Phylloscopidae so deep to justify a generic split, Phylloscopus and Seicercus, like Sylvia and Curruca ?

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