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Rhinocryptidae

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Old Tuesday 27th October 2009, 21:57   #1
Peter Kovalik
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Rhinocryptidae

New paper about Rhinocryptidae in Journal of Ornithology: Per G. P. Ericson, Storrs L. Olson, Martin Irestedt, Herculano Alvarenga, Jon Fjeldsa: Circumscription of a monophyletic family for the tapaculos (Aves: Rhinocryptidae): Psiloramphus in and Melanopareia out.
Irestedt et al. (2002) associated Teledromas with Melanopareia. However Teledromas is part of Rhinocryptidae while Melanopareia clusters with Thamnophilidae and Conopophagidae (in Melanopareiidae). Rhinocryptidae consists of two major clades: Clade 1: Teledromas, Acropternis, Rhinocrypta, Liosceles and Clade 2: Psilorhamphus and Scytalopus, Eugralla, Myornis, Merulaxis, and Eleoscytalopus. Confirmed in principle 2 subfamilies - Scytalopodinae & Rhinocryptinae by Moyle et al. in Cladistic 25 (2009) Phylogeny and phylogenetic classification of the antbirds, ovenbirds, woodcreepers, and allies (Aves: Passeriformes: infraorder Furnariides) except position of Scelorchilus and Pteroptochos in clade 2 - Rhinocryptinae.
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Old Tuesday 27th October 2009, 22:28   #2
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Peter, welcome to Birdforum!

Is this paper publicly available?

Thanks
Niels
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Old Wednesday 28th October 2009, 01:57   #3
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I found it at http://www.springerlink.com/content/...6/fulltext.pdf
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Old Wednesday 28th October 2009, 16:49   #4
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Thank you. The main conclusions seems to be more or less the same as in two previous papers, even though the description of the family Melanopareiidae is new (a previous description seemingly invalid). Any minor points that I should have noticed?

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Old Tuesday 17th August 2010, 17:55   #5
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AOU-SACC Proposal #423 to change the linear sequence of genera in Rhinocryptidae (following Ericson et al 2009) passed 17 Aug 2010.
http://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCprop423.html

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Old Friday 28th September 2012, 06:18   #6
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MAURΝCIO, G. N., ARETA, J. I., BORNSCHEIN, M. R. and REIS, R. E. (2012), Morphology-based phylogenetic analysis and classification of the family Rhinocryptidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 166: 377–432. doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2012.00847.x
Abstract
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Old Saturday 29th September 2012, 13:03   #7
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Maurνcio et al 2012

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
MAURΝCIO, G. N., ARETA, J. I., BORNSCHEIN, M. R. and REIS, R. E. (2012), Morphology-based phylogenetic analysis and classification of the family Rhinocryptidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 166: 377–432. doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2012.00847.x Abstract
Proposes the following classification scheme...
Quote:
FAMILY RHINOCRYPTIDAE
–– SUBFAMILY LIOSCELINAE, NEW TAXON
–––––––– Genus Liosceles
–– SUBFAMILY RHINOCRYPTINAE
–––– TRIBE PSILORHAMPHINI, NEW RANK
–––––––– Genus Psilorhamphus
–––– TRIBE MERULAXINI, NEW TAXON
–––––––– Genus Eleoscytalopus
–––––––– Genus Merulaxis
–––– TRIBE RHINOCRYPTINI, NEW RANK
–––––– SUBTRIBE ACROPTERNINA, NEW TAXON
–––––––– Genus Acropternis
–––––– SUBTRIBE RHINOCRYPTINA, NEW RANK
–––––––– Genus Rhinocrypta
–––––––– Genus Teledromas
–––––– SUBTRIBE PTEROPTOCHINA, NEW RANK
–––––––– Genus Pteroptochos
–––––––– Genus Scelorchilus
–––––– SUBTRIBE SCYTALOPODINA, NEW RANK
–––––––– Genus Eugralla
–––––––– Genus Myornis
–––––––– Genus Scytalopus
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Old Monday 1st October 2012, 06:57   #8
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TiF

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Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
MAURΝCIO, G. N., ARETA, J. I., BORNSCHEIN, M. R. and REIS, R. E. (2012), Morphology-based phylogenetic analysis and classification of the family Rhinocryptidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 166: 377–432. doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.2012.00847.x
Abstract
John Boyd (TiF):
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/changes.html [30 Sep 2012]
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/List14.html#rhinocryptidae
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Old Wednesday 19th June 2013, 20:47   #9
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Scytalopus sp

Hosner, Robbins, Valqui & Peterson 2013. A new species of Scytalopus tapaculo (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from the Andes of central Peru. Wilson J Ornithol 125(2): 233–242. [abstract]

Name...?
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Old Wednesday 19th June 2013, 20:51   #10
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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Hosner, Robbins, Valqui & Peterson 2013. A new species of Scytalopus tapaculo (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from the Andes of central Peru. Wilson J Ornithol 125(2): 233–242. [abstract]

Name...?
I assume this is the "well known" Milpo Tapaculo, seen by a fair few birders in recent years.

cheers, alan
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 07:20   #11
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Scytalopus gettyae

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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Hosner, Robbins, Valqui & Peterson 2013. A new species of Scytalopus tapaculo (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from the Andes of central Peru. Wilson J Ornithol 125(2): 233–242. [abstract]

Name...?

Scytalopus gettyae
Junin Tapaculo
Tapaculo de Junνn (Spanish).
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 08:05   #12
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I assume this is the "well known" Milpo Tapaculo, seen by a fair few birders in recent years.

cheers, alan
Called "Millpo" Tap in PAJM's write-up of his last trip to Central Peru:

"‘Millpo’ Tapaculo Scytalopus sp. nov.: This as yet undescribed tapaculo (which is presumably another endemic), was seen very well along the Satipo Road."

‘http://www.birdquest-tours.com/pdfs/...2011-ebook.pdf

I think Satipo Road is within Junin province (at least within that central valley), so this must surely be the same thing.

cheers, alan
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 08:07   #13
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and songs & calls (10 recordings) here:

http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Sc...-sp.nov.Millpo

cheers, a
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 08:29   #14
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Scytalopus gettyae

Quote:
Originally Posted by lewis20126 View Post
I think Satipo Road is within Junin province (at least within that central valley), so this must surely be the same thing.
Holotype...
Quote:
... Collected and prepared by PAH (PAH #667) on 7 October 2008 in Junνn Department, Peru, in the Huaytapallana Cordillera below Cerro Apalla, between Calabaza and Toldopampa, near the Rνo Satipo, at 2,500 m (11.509 ΊS, 74.840 ΊW) from a roadside Chusquea bamboo thicket in humid montane forest. ...
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 13:59   #15
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A New Species of Scytalopus Tapaculo (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from the Andes of Central Peru

Junin Tapaculo Scytalopus gettyae sp. nov. It has been known for many years as "Millpo’ Tapaculo".

We describe a new species of Scytalopus tapaculo (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from the temperate humid montane forests (2,400–3,200 m) of Junνn Department, Peru. This species has a unique song that differs strikingly from that of any known Scytalopus species, consisting of a rapidly repeated series of ascending phrases. Phenotypically, the new species is uniformly blackish in color and small-to-medium in size, most similar to members of the allopatric S. latrans complex. At least six species of Scytalopus occur along an elevational gradient on the eastern slopes of the Andes in Junνn; in the vicinity of the type locality, the new species replaces S. femoralis at 2,400–2,500 m, and is replaced by S. acutirostris at 2,900–3,200 m. Throughout its elevational range, the new species is broadly syntopic with the larger S. macropus. This species is currently known from a single river drainage; although it probably occurs more broadly, it is likely a range-restricted species endemic to central Peru.

www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1676/12-055.1


Wilson Journal of Ornithology Jun 2013 : Volume 125 Issue 2

Last edited by Melanie : Friday 21st June 2013 at 10:10.
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 15:47   #16
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>>Junin Tapaculo Scytalopus gettyae sp. nov. It has been known for many years as "Millpo’ Tapaculo".<<

I'm quite sure that the bird described here is *not* the 'Millpo Tapaculo,' but rather a bird that has been identified by various birders visiting the forests of the Satipo Road as 'Satipo form of Large-footed Tapaculo.' Notice that it is part of the S. latrans group (not the S. magellanicus group, as is the Millpo), and that it is from forests at 2400-3200m elevation or so, not treeline (>3200m).

Therefore, the correct link to Xeno-canto vocalizations would be:
http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Sc...o+road+form%22
... and not the link offered above.

Last edited by DLane : Thursday 20th June 2013 at 15:50.
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 22:01   #17
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Can someone with access to the Wilson paper provide details of the person commemorated by Scytalopus gettyae? With thanks in advance.
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 22:06   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
Can someone with access to the Wilson paper provide details of the person commemorated by Scytalopus gettyae? With thanks in advance.
Here it is:

Quote:
Etymology.—The new species is named gettyae after Caroline Marie Getty in honor of her long- term dedication to nature preservation. She has devoted significant time and effort to conservation, serving on boards for numerous organizations, including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF). Thanks in part to her leadership, NFWF has expanded its focus and impact in wildlife conservation. The English vernacular name highlights the restricted known distribution of S. gettyae: Jun ́ın, Peru.
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Old Thursday 20th June 2013, 22:54   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DLane View Post
>>Junin Tapaculo Scytalopus gettyae sp. nov. It has been known for many years as "Millpo’ Tapaculo".<<

I'm quite sure that the bird described here is *not* the 'Millpo Tapaculo,' but rather a bird that has been identified by various birders visiting the forests of the Satipo Road as 'Satipo form of Large-footed Tapaculo.' Notice that it is part of the S. latrans group (not the S. magellanicus group, as is the Millpo), and that it is from forests at 2400-3200m elevation or so, not treeline (>3200m).

Therefore, the correct link to Xeno-canto vocalizations would be:
http://www.xeno-canto.org/species/Sc...o+road+form%22
... and not the link offered above.
Dan

I'll bow to your far greater knowledge on this and have not read the paper. However the statement "Phenotypically, the new species is uniformly blackish in color and small-to-medium in size, most similar to members of the allopatric S. latrans complex." seems at odds with a close relative of S. macropus, given that species is much the largest of the genus.

cheers, alan
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Old Friday 21st June 2013, 02:18   #20
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<<However the statement "Phenotypically, the new species is uniformly blackish in color and small-to-medium in size, most similar to members of the allopatric S. latrans complex." seems at odds with a close relative of S. macropus, given that species is much the largest of the genus.>>

I'm not sure what you mean by this. The fact is that S. gettyae and S. macropus are not the same thing, and the only reason they were thought to be is because no one had specimens to compare (and someone made a bit of a far-fetched leap in logic that this voice may belong to S. macropus. As it turns out, S. macropus has been the center of a lot of faulty identifications by field observers who were callus about putting names on populations... but that's another topic). This is yet *another* case where specimen material has proven to be key to untangling a taxonomic complex that would otherwise not be solved without scientific collecting.
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Old Friday 21st June 2013, 07:18   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DLane View Post

I'm not sure what you mean by this. The fact is that S. gettyae and S. macropus are not the same thing, and the only reason they were thought to be is because no one had specimens to compare (and someone made a bit of a far-fetched leap in logic that this voice may belong to S. macropus. As it turns out, S. macropus has been the center of a lot of faulty identifications by field observers who were callus about putting names on populations... but that's another topic). This is yet *another* case where specimen material has proven to be key to untangling a taxonomic complex that would otherwise not be solved without scientific collecting.
I get it now - Field observers had "identified" this new bird as a southern relative of macropus (perhaps based on plumage, but perhaps false assumptions about size?), hence the labels on xeno-canto. It turns out to be nothing of the kind. I had assumed that it must be a big Scytalopus for the confusion even to have arisen in the first place!

cheers, alan
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Old Saturday 22nd June 2013, 05:53   #22
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scytalopus gettyae

fixed now: www.xeno-canto.org/species/Scytalopus-gettyae
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Old Monday 24th June 2013, 06:01   #23
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Scytalopus gettyae

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Hosner, Robbins, Valqui & Peterson 2013. A new species of Scytalopus tapaculo (Aves: Passeriformes: Rhinocryptidae) from the Andes of central Peru. Wilson J Ornithol 125(2): 233–242. [abstract]
On NEOORN yesterday...
Quote:
A question regarding the new Scytalopus from Peru

Hi all,

Maybe this has already been covered in this forum; my apologies if it has. Anyway, I just read the paper describing Scytalopus gettyae, and I was surprised that the introduction made it sound like the authors discovered that bird from scratch. I know for a fact that the taxon was known for years before their field work (and I had heard of it at least 3 years before their field work started), and that many observers had seen it, heard it, and commented on it being a new species before 2008. Yet the paper published made it sound like the authors genuinely discovered the new bird. I am curious if there is a reason for this, and why the ones who originally did find the bird weren't mentioned nor the history before the 2008 field work. I find it disturbing that many observations prior to the field work weren't discussed; it is a disincentive for amateurs to report their observations of potentially new species and strikes me as borderline unethical. I would like the hear the thoughts of the community here at large and see if I am off base in thinking this.

Andrew Spencer
Centennial, CO, USA and Quito, Ecuador
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Old Monday 24th June 2013, 06:47   #24
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'Millpo Tapaculo'

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Originally Posted by DLane View Post
I'm quite sure that the bird described here [Scytalopus gettyae] is *not* the 'Millpo Tapaculo,' but rather a bird that has been identified by various birders visiting the forests of the Satipo Road as 'Satipo form of Large-footed Tapaculo.' Notice that it is part of the S. latrans group (not the S. magellanicus group, as is the Millpo), and that it is from forests at 2400-3200m elevation or so, not treeline (>3200m).
Presumably these comments in Hosner et al 2013 refer to the 'Millpo Tapaculo'...
Quote:
A small, pale Scytalopus in the magellanicus complex occurs at high elevations above treeline in Junνn, although its taxonomic affinities (along with populations in Pasco and Ayacucho) are unclear and awaiting revision (Krabbe and Schulenberg 2003, Lloyd 2004, Schulenberg et al. 2007). We tentatively refer to this taxon as S. cf. altirostris/simonsi; it is similar to allopatric S. altirostris (Amazonas south to Huαnuco, Peru) and S. simonsi (Cuzco south to central Bolivia) in appearance and ecology but differs from each in song.
Fig 3 shows a spectrogram of the song, and Table 1 gives elevational distribution (3,300–3,800 m) and morphological measurements based on two specimens – almost a description!

Last edited by Richard Klim : Monday 24th June 2013 at 06:54. Reason: typo.
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Old Tuesday 25th June 2013, 03:01   #25
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Richard, I think you're over-simplifying here - see the discussion on xeno-canto under "latest news" about how recordings by non-authors on xeno-canto were mis-described in the paper:
http://www.xeno-canto.org/

I don't know the story here. But I have noted though that the approach of some peer reviewers and 'big rated journals' to description papers is not condusive to including details of history of a discovery in a paper of this nature. This is one reason why taxonomic and description papers are, again in my view, better published in a journal like Bull BOC which will publish history and background details. I have been told sometimes that details of "who found things when" are "not relevant" and should be deleted. Some journals and reviewers only want to see published some methods (solely of the authors), results and conclusions. In the context of a new species, which is principally write-up of an act of discovery and nomenclature (even if also a scientific piece involving testing of hypotheses about relations), this does not seem appropriate.
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