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Zosteropidae

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Old Monday 6th June 2011, 19:07   #1
Peter Kovalik
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Zosteropidae

MELO, M., WARREN, B. H. and JONES, P. J. (2011), Rapid parallel evolution of aberrant traits in the diversification of the Gulf of Guinea white-eyes (Aves, Zosteropidae). Molecular Ecology, 20: no. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05099.x

Abstract
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Old Monday 6th June 2011, 19:47   #2
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Hi Peter,

Did you read the full paper?

I'm looking forward for a genetic study that will compare São Tomé & Príncipe White-eyes that are looking very different in the field with different voice. I'm almost sure they should be splitted and even not group in the same super-species.

Cheers
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Old Monday 6th June 2011, 20:01   #3
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As usual, John Boyd is on top of it:

http://jboyd.net/Taxo/List23.html#zosteropidae
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Old Monday 6th June 2011, 20:06   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Valéry Schollaert View Post
Hi Peter,

Did you read the full paper?

I'm looking forward for a genetic study that will compare São Tomé & Príncipe White-eyes that are looking very different in the field with different voice. I'm almost sure they should be splitted and even not group in the same super-species.

Cheers
Valéry

see Boyd's webpage
or send me via private message your email address
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Old Wednesday 8th June 2011, 07:54   #5
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Thanks, good news...
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Old Saturday 11th June 2011, 10:41   #6
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Is Zosterops semiflavus is generally accepted as full species again or is Mr. John Boyd the only expert who treat this bird as full species?
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Old Wednesday 15th June 2011, 13:41   #7
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Melo et al 2011

Birdwatch Listcheck article by David Callahan.
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Old Thursday 23rd June 2011, 15:34   #8
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São Tomé White-eye

IOC World Bird List v2.9 (draft) provisionally splits Zosterops feae Sao Tome White-eye from Z ficedulinus Principe White-eye, following Melo et al 2011.
www.worldbirdnames.org/updates-spp.html

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Old Thursday 23rd June 2011, 17:05   #9
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also, under the taxonomic update tab, all of the Speirops have been synomized with Zosterops, although they keep there common names
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Old Tuesday 4th February 2014, 20:07   #10
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DISSERTATION RESEARCH: Disentangling phylogenetic relationships in an explosive bird radiation
Abstract here
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Old Thursday 27th March 2014, 18:37   #11
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Cox, SC; (2013) Molecular Systematics and Diversification of African Zosteropidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Doctoral thesis, UCL (University College London).

[Abstract]
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Old Friday 28th March 2014, 14:26   #12
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Ponce-Reyes, R., Clegg, S. M., Carvalho, S. B., McDonald-Madden, E., Possingham, H. P. (2014), Geographical surrogates of genetic variation for selecting island populations for conservation. Diversity and Distributions. doi: 10.1111/ddi.12195

[Abstract]
[Supporting Information]

Last edited by Peter Kovalik : Friday 28th March 2014 at 14:28. Reason: supp info
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Old Saturday 19th April 2014, 09:55   #13
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Husemann, M., Ulrich, W., Habel, J.C. (submitted) The effects of geographic isolation and sympatry on acoustic traits of two bird species (Aves, Zosteropidae). BMC Evolutionary Biology

Habel JC, Mulwa R, Cox S, Gassert F, Engler JO, Rödder D, Eggermont H, Husemann M, Lens L. (submitted) Evolution on East African sky-islands: The biogeography of Zosterops poliogaster (Aves, Zosteropidae).
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Old Wednesday 30th April 2014, 19:28   #14
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J C Habel, R K Mulwa, F Gassert, D Rödder, W Ulrich, L Borghesio, M Husemann and L Lens. Population signatures of large-scale, long-term disjunction and small-scale, short-term habitat fragmentation in an Afromontane forest bird. Heredity , (9 April 2014) | doi:10.1038/hdy.2014.15.
[Abstract]
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Old Saturday 21st June 2014, 18:22   #15
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TiF Update June 21

Based on Cox et al., (2014), I've returned the Kenya White-eye, Zosterops flavilateralis to Abyssinian White-eye (Z. abyssinicus), but split the Socotra White-eye (Z. socotranus) from Abyssinian White-eye. Further, I've also split Kivu White-eye (Z. reichenowi) from African Yellow White-eye (Zosterops senegalensis). I've changed the English name of Zosterops stierlingi to Southern Yellow White-eye to reflect hypothesized species limits, which rather speculatively include the senegalensis races kasaicus, heinrichi, quanzae, anderssoni, and tongensis. This means that the African Yellow White-eye, Zosterops senegalensis, is assumed to include demeryi, gerhardi, toroensis, stuhlmanni. Cox et al. found that jacksoni groups with senegalensis. Finally, The Montane White-eye, Zosterops poliogastrus is assumed to include kaffensis and kulalensis (although I have doubts about the latter). I take no position on eurycricotus.
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Old Saturday 21st June 2014, 19:09   #16
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Socotra White-eye

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
TiF Update June 21
Based on Cox et al., (2014), I've ... split the Socotra White-eye (Z. socotranus) from Abyssinian White-eye.
Cox, S.C., R.P. Prys-Jones, J.C. Habel, B.A. Amakobe, and J.J. Day (2014), Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae), Mol. Biol. Evol. (forthcoming).

Contra Kirwan 2007 (Studies of Socotran birds IV. Synonymization of six endemic bird taxa...).

Last edited by Richard Klim : Saturday 21st June 2014 at 19:13.
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Old Saturday 21st June 2014, 19:49   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Cox, S.C., R.P. Prys-Jones, J.C. Habel, B.A. Amakobe, and J.J. Day (2014), Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae), [I]Mol. Biol. Evol[/i]. (forthcoming).

Contra Kirwan 2007 (Studies of Socotran birds IV. Synonymization of six endemic bird taxa...).
Richard, it seems John mixed up journals - Cox, S.C., R.P. Prys-Jones, J.C. Habel, B.A. Amakobe, and J.J. Day (2014), Niche divergence promotes rapid diversification of East African sky island white-eyes (Aves: Zosteropidae), Molecular Ecology.
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Old Saturday 21st June 2014, 20:12   #18
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Thanks, Peter. Too many 'Mol...' journals nowadays.

Btw, despite the original title, there's more about the recent work on East African white-eyes in this thread: Southern African white-eyes.

Last edited by Richard Klim : Sunday 22nd June 2014 at 08:26. Reason: related thread.
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Old Saturday 21st June 2014, 20:37   #19
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Umm, "sky" island?
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Old Saturday 21st June 2014, 21:41   #20
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Umm, "sky" island?
eg, a major attraction for birders in SE Arizona: Wikipedia.
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Old Sunday 22nd June 2014, 06:20   #21
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(revised)
Kirwan (2007) argues that the white-breasted subspecies of Abyssinian White-eye ((Z. abyssinicus) are closely related. These include socotranus, arabs, and omoensis. Based on Cox et al. (2014), who included socotranus, and the yellow-breasted flavilateralis and jubaensis, the Abyssinian White-eye is two species: the white-breasted Abyssinian White-eye and the yellow-breasted Kenya White-eye (Z. flavilateralis) including jubaensis. These were already recognized on the TiF list, but the subspecies allocation was unclear. I've split Kivu White-eye (Z. reichenowi) from African Yellow White-eye (Zosterops senegalensis) and changed the English name of Zosterops stierlingi to Southern Yellow White-eye to reflect hypothesized species limits, which rather speculatively include the senegalensis races kasaicus, heinrichi, quanzae, anderssoni, and tongensis. This means that the African Yellow White-eye, Zosterops senegalensis, is assumed to include demeryi, gerhardi, toroensis, stuhlmanni. Cox et al. found that jacksoni groups with senegalensis. Finally, The Montane White-eye, Zosterops poliogastrus is assumed to include kaffensis and kulalensis (although I have doubts about the latter). I take no position on eurycricotus.

This has been revised as comments on BirdForum brought Kirwan (2007) to my attention.
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Old Sunday 22nd June 2014, 09:43   #22
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eg, a major attraction for birders in SE Arizona: Wikipedia.
Thanks, Richard. I'll probably get used to the term, which at the moment strikes me as rather twee!

Presumably Cox et al 2014 do refer to at least some of these - Cal Madow, Cameroonian Highlands forests, Ethiopian Highlands, Highlands of southern Africa, Mount Kilimanjaro and the Rwenzori Mountains - in the body of the paper in relation to Zosterops taxa distributions. I had been a bit parochial in my consideration of senegalensis and socotranus on their own!
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Old Sunday 22nd June 2014, 16:51   #23
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Thanks, Richard. I'll probably get used to the term, which at the moment strikes me as rather twee!
I like the term (and have known it for ages). The Cairngorms with their Dotterels and Ptarmigans are a good example of a sky island too.
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Old Tuesday 24th June 2014, 10:45   #24
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Oliveros et al

Oliveros, Andersen & Moyle. Disentangling phylogenetic relationships in an explosive bird radiation. Evolution 2014. (p217)
Quote:
Rapid evolutionary radiations allow tremendous insights into speciation and biogeographic history. However, a major challenge in studies of these brief bursts of diversification has been poor resolution of species’ phylogenetic relationships owing to short internodes among ancestral lineages, incomplete lineage sorting, long-branch attraction, and homoplasy. As a consequence, too few robust phylogenetic hypotheses are available to document such radiations. This study aims to resolve relationships within a very rapid and diverse radiation using both simulated and empirical data to illuminate underlying processes of lineage splitting and dispersal.

The passerine family of white-eyes (Zosteropidae) presents an ideal system for investigating one of the most striking evolutionary radiations known among vertebrates. The distribution of this group of 120 species spans a vast area in the Old World, from the eastern Atlantic to the Western Pacific. A vast majority of this lineage is estimated to have begun diversifying only in the early Pleistocene, resulting in the highest speciation rate yet documented among land vertebrates. The relatively recent diversification of this clade minimizes problems of long-branch attraction and homoplasy confounding phylogenetic inference.

Hence, this young and species-rich group provides an excellent system in which to examine macro-evolutionary and biogeographic patterns in rapid radiations, lines of research that depend on a robust estimate of phylogenetic relationships. Data from three mitochondrial genes and two nuclear introns yield a poorly-resolved phylogeny, but simulations suggest that increasing the number of loci to ~100 may improve resolution considerably. As predicted, DNA sequence data from hundreds of ultraconserved elements provide a much better resolved estimate of phylogenetic relationships in this rapid radiation.

Resolution of phylogenetic relationships within Zosteropidae is vital to opening novel research avenues in historical biogeography and population genetics across several archipelagos and understanding the process of speciation in a species-rich but morphologically conserved group. More broadly, this study provides methodological insights into paths toward resolving relationships in other rapid evolutionary radiations across the tree
of life.
[With thanks to Nick Sly.]

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Old Friday 15th May 2015, 06:26   #25
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Cox, SC. 2013. Molecular Systematics and Diversification of African Zosteropidae (Aves: Passeriformes). Doctoral thesis, UCL (University College London).

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