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Rufous Antpitta

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Old Thursday 7th July 2011, 10:51   #1
Daniel Philippe
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Rufous Antpitta

Chesser, R. T. et al., EXTRAORDINARY GENETIC AND VOCAL VARIATION IN THE GRALLARIA RUFULA COMPLEX. 2011 AOU Meeting in Jacksonville, Florida. Abstract
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Old Thursday 7th July 2011, 11:31   #2
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"Our results indicate that the G. rufula complex consists of numerous genetic units, almost all of which differ enough vocally to be considered separate biological species."

anyone know their defintion of numerous?

thanks
alan
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Old Thursday 7th July 2011, 12:02   #3
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  • AOU-SACC:
    "Geographic variation in song strongly suggests that Grallaria rufula includes more than one species (Krabbe & Schulenberg 2003a). Hilty (2003) noted that plumage and size differences alone suggest that saltuensis from the Perijá Mountains may be a separate species, and Krabbe & Schulenberg (2003a) suggested that saltuensis might be more closely related to G. quitensis."

  • Krabbe & Schulenberg 2003 (HBW 8)

  • Ridgely & Tudor 2009 (Birds of S America: Passerines):
    "What is presently considered Grallaria rufula (Rufous Antpitta) almost certainly comprises more than one species. Cajamarcae of n. Peru seems particularly distinct, on account of plumage differences and its markedly different song; it could be called Cajamarca Antpitta."

Last edited by Richard Klim : Thursday 7th July 2011 at 12:34. Reason: typo
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Old Thursday 7th July 2011, 13:03   #4
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I seem to recall the birds at Cerro Mongus (N Ecuador) sounding different to those in southern Ecuador although I think they are currently one taxon. "Numerous" sounds rather higher than ten to me - which would be a worry (for those interested in seeing them!).

Cheers, alan
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Old Thursday 23rd August 2012, 07:14   #5
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Vocalisations

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Old Thursday 23rd August 2012, 21:29   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewis20126 View Post
I seem to recall the birds at Cerro Mongus (N Ecuador) sounding different to those in southern Ecuador although I think they are currently one taxon. "Numerous" sounds rather higher than ten to me - which would be a worry (for those interested in seeing them!).
I think you're well on your way though?
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Old Friday 24th August 2012, 13:58   #7
Ian Lewis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewis20126 View Post
"Our results indicate that the G. rufula complex consists of numerous genetic units, almost all of which differ enough vocally to be considered separate biological species."


thanks
alan
Quote from Huw Llloyd in the trip write up for a tour I did to N Peru in September 2005

'Rufous (Cajamarca) Antpitta Grallaria rufula cajamarcae: CONSERVATION STATUS: ENDEMIC, NOT GLOBALLY THREATENED. Brief views of one very difficult individual as it crossed open ground briefly at Cruz Conga. The manuscript concerned with the split of the Rufous Antpitta complex is on hold for completely unknown (and probably ridiculous) reasons. Split ‘em folks but watch this space.'

Ian
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Old Friday 24th August 2012, 14:13   #8
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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Andrew Spencer:
Great article by AS on xeno-canto - I wouldn't mind betting there are a few more local forms out there. Back on the 1990s, I certainly didn't appreciate the difference between "call" and "song" so certainly need to re-listen to my Ecuador recordings with that in mind.

Xenospiza - have had fabulous views of 5/7 of the mapped forms, but sure quite a few folk have 6/7 with the Perija birds the least accessible? I have re-listened to the song from Urrao of the birds we saw there and it doesn't sound too much different from the west Andean form, allowing for some minor variation...

cheers, a
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Old Sunday 19th January 2020, 22:55   #9
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Chesser, R. T., M. L. Isler, A. M. Cuervo, C. D. Cadena, S. C. Galen, L. M. Bergner, R. C. Fleischer, G. A. Bravo, D. F. Lane & P. A. Hosner. 2020. Conservative plumage masks extraordinary phylogenetic diversity in the Grallaria rufula (Rufous Antpitta) complex of the humid Andes. The Auk: in press.

Link to Cadena's site

and higher up on the same page, under Manuscripts:

Isler, M. L., R. T. Chesser, M. B. Robbins, A. M. Cuervo, C. D. Cadena & P. A. Hosner. Taxonomic evaluation of the Rufous Antpitta complex (Aves: Grallariidae) distinguishes sixteen species. In revision.
________________________________________________________________

Grallaria rufula is traditionally considered to contain 7 subspecies. So that might mean up to 9 new species being described in one paper. "Grallaria rufula complex" might include G. blakei though (which apparently harbours its own cryptic species), in which case there might not be quite as many as 9.

Cheers,
Liam
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Old Monday 15th June 2020, 17:01   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thyoloalethe View Post
Chesser, R. T., M. L. Isler, A. M. Cuervo, C. D. Cadena, S. C. Galen, L. M. Bergner, R. C. Fleischer, G. A. Bravo, D. F. Lane & P. A. Hosner. 2020. Conservative plumage masks extraordinary phylogenetic diversity in the Grallaria rufula (Rufous Antpitta) complex of the humid Andes. The Auk: in press.

Link to Cadena's site

and higher up on the same page, under Manuscripts:

Isler, M. L., R. T. Chesser, M. B. Robbins, A. M. Cuervo, C. D. Cadena & P. A. Hosner. Taxonomic evaluation of the Rufous Antpitta complex (Aves: Grallariidae) distinguishes sixteen species. In revision.
________________________________________________________________

Grallaria rufula is traditionally considered to contain 7 subspecies. So that might mean up to 9 new species being described in one paper. "Grallaria rufula complex" might include G. blakei though (which apparently harbours its own cryptic species), in which case there might not be quite as many as 9.

Cheers,
Liam
R Terry Chesser, Morton L Isler, Andrés M Cuervo, C Daniel Cadena, Spencer C Galen, Laura M Bergner, Robert C Fleischer, Gustavo A Bravo, Daniel F Lane, Peter A Hosner, Conservative plumage masks extraordinary phylogenetic diversity in the Grallaria rufula (Rufous Antpitta) complex of the humid Andes, The Auk, , ukaa009, https://doi.org/10.1093/auk/ukaa009

Abstract:

The Grallaria rufula complex is currently considered to consist of 2 species, G. rufula (Rufous Antpitta) and G. blakei (Chestnut Antpitta). However, it has been suggested that the complex, populations of which occur in humid montane forests from Venezuela to Bolivia, comprises a suite of vocally distinct yet morphologically cryptic species. We sequenced nuclear and mitochondrial DNA for 80 individuals from across the distribution of the complex to determine the extent of genetic variation between and within described taxa. Our results revealed 18 geographically coherent clades separated by substantial genetic divergence: 14 within rufula, 3 within blakei, and 1 corresponding to G. rufocinerea (Bicolored Antpitta), a species with distinctive plumage found to be nested within the complex. Neither G. rufula nor G. blakei as presently defined was monophyletic. Although 6 of the 7 recognized subspecies of G. rufula were monophyletic, several subspecies contained substantial genetic differentiation. Genetic variation was largely partitioned across recognized geographic barriers, especially across deep river valleys in Peru and Colombia. Coalescent modeling identified 17 of the 18 clades as significantly differentiated lineages, whereas analyses of vocalizations delineated 16 biological species within the complex. The G. rufula complex seems unusually diverse even among birds of the humid Andes, a prime location for cryptic speciation; however, the extent to which other dispersal-limited Andean species groups exhibit similar degrees of cryptic differentiation awaits further study.
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Old Tuesday 21st July 2020, 04:44   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thyoloalethe View Post

Isler, M. L., R. T. Chesser, M. B. Robbins, A. M. Cuervo, C. D. Cadena & P. A. Hosner. Taxonomic evaluation of the Rufous Antpitta complex (Aves: Grallariidae) distinguishes sixteen species. In revision.
______________________________________________

Finally out: https://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article...otaxa.4817.1.1

Abstract

Populations in the Rufous Antpitta (Grallaria rufula) complex occupy humid montane forests of the Andes from northern Colombia and adjacent Venezuela to central Bolivia. Their tawny to cinnamon-colored plumages are generally uniform, featuring subtle variation in hue and saturation across this range. In contrast to their conservative plumage, substantial vocal differences occur among geographically isolated or parapatric populations. Working within the framework of a comprehensive molecular phylogeny, we reexamined species limits in the G. rufula complex, basing taxonomic recommendations on diagnostic differences in vocalizations and considering identifiable differences in plumage where pertinent. We identified 16 populations for species designation, including seven populations previously described as subspecies and, remarkably, six new species described herein. Within one of these species, we identified less robust vocal differences between populations that we designate as subspecies. Geographic variation exists within another species, but its critical evaluation requires additional material. Taxonomic revisions of groups consisting of cryptic species, like the Grallaria rufula complex, are imperative for their conservation. Rather than widespread species as currently defined, these complexes can comprise many range-restricted taxa at higher risk of extinction given the continuing human pressures on their habitats.

I can download the full pdf from sci-hub at this link, I don't know if it will work for everyone: https://sci-hub.st/10.11646/zootaxa.4817.1.1
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Old Tuesday 21st July 2020, 09:54   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cajanuma View Post
Finally out: https://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article...otaxa.4817.1.1

Abstract

Populations in the Rufous Antpitta (Grallaria rufula) complex occupy humid montane forests of the Andes from northern Colombia and adjacent Venezuela to central Bolivia. Their tawny to cinnamon-colored plumages are generally uniform, featuring subtle variation in hue and saturation across this range. In contrast to their conservative plumage, substantial vocal differences occur among geographically isolated or parapatric populations. Working within the framework of a comprehensive molecular phylogeny, we reexamined species limits in the G. rufula complex, basing taxonomic recommendations on diagnostic differences in vocalizations and considering identifiable differences in plumage where pertinent. We identified 16 populations for species designation, including seven populations previously described as subspecies and, remarkably, six new species described herein. Within one of these species, we identified less robust vocal differences between populations that we designate as subspecies. Geographic variation exists within another species, but its critical evaluation requires additional material. Taxonomic revisions of groups consisting of cryptic species, like the Grallaria rufula complex, are imperative for their conservation. Rather than widespread species as currently defined, these complexes can comprise many range-restricted taxa at higher risk of extinction given the continuing human pressures on their habitats.

I can download the full pdf from sci-hub at this link, I don't know if it will work for everyone: https://sci-hub.st/10.11646/zootaxa.4817.1.1
Very helpful Cajanuma, many thanks! Once I've read that paper I will have to go and revisit my notes on vocalisations from Urrao, Colombia in 2011- presumably they relate to the new G. alvarezi i Chami Antpitta
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Old Tuesday 21st July 2020, 20:37   #13
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Anyone who can't get it from sci-hub, it has also been put in a dropbox by one of the authors - link on twitter here: https://twitter.com/amcuervo/status/1285402860562284544
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