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Moore's Law - Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

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Old Wednesday 30th October 2019, 11:49   #1
Chosun Juan
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Cool Moore's Law - Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography

This is for the dedicated gear head !
With the digital imaging device (whether DSLR or even moreso MILC) relying more and more on increasingly sophisticated and more powerful electronics, I thought it would be interesting to post this Lithographic video and how die sizes continue to shrink in line with Moore's Law and the technological advances required to achieve it
I also posted this in the Binocular forum for the optical physics content, but there seems a mostly different audience that hangs in the Photography forums and rarely do the Twain meet ! Enjoy :)

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=f0gMdGrVteI




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Old Wednesday 30th October 2019, 19:16   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chosun Juan View Post
This is for the dedicated gear head !
With the digital imaging device (whether DSLR or even moreso MILC) relying more and more on increasingly sophisticated and more powerful electronics, I thought it would be interesting to post this Lithographic video and how die sizes continue to shrink in line with Moore's Law and the technological advances required to achieve it. I also posted this in the Binocular forum for the optical physics content, but there seems a mostly different audience that hangs in the Photography forums and rarely do the Twain meet ! Enjoy :) Chosun
I bought a one terabyte MicroSD card from Sandisk when they were first released a few months ago. Fingernail sized, and able to store as much as 1500 hours of quality video for an iPad. I used it in a Leica "C-Lux" for awhile to test it, but I don't know ultimately reliable it is.

In 2009, Leica released the M9 camera, which was the smallest full-frame camera at that time. The sensor contained some kind of "micro lenses" which I presume were needed to bend the light to get onto the sensor in such a small body.

My memory of electronics in the 1970's had EPROMs being burnt by UV or similar light, but it would be a few more years until flash memory arrived, enabling read/write capability. When I was able to buy an 85 mb (mb!) PCMCIA card for my HP200LX pocket computer in the late 90's, for $2300 USD, that was quite a breakthrough!
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Old Thursday 31st October 2019, 00:43   #3
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Very fine documentary and a tribute to European researchers. Wonder whether the expertise from CERN was a factor?
They are the only supplier of this capability in the world. Nikon was not able to afford the needed investment and ASML too would have gone under if Intel had not invested several billion along the way.
Ironic that the main beneficiaries and system users to date are TSMC and Samsung, with Intel lagging.
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Old Thursday 31st October 2019, 20:07   #4
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I just finished reading of the book "De architecten van ASML"by Renee Raaijmakers, Techwatch Books, the development of a small company to world leading company. It started as part of Philips in Eindhoven and after a fairly long time it became an independent company with a large production facility in Veldhoven, The Netherlands.
The scientists and engineers come from all over the world to work there, so it becomes kind of difficult to find housing for them.
One of our PhD students and a postdoc went to work there and as far as I know, they still do.
One of the secrets of ASML's success (but there are quite a few) is the modular system with which the wafer stepper is built, so reairs are much easier and quicker than with other types of construction. For ASMl it was quite a job to get Zeiss so far that it was able to make the necessary optical components of sufficient quality.
Demands and precision of such high quality, that making the optical components for binoculars or cameras seems child play compared with this kind of optics.
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Old Thursday 31st October 2019, 23:56   #5
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Originally Posted by Gijs van Ginkel View Post
I just finished reading of the book "De architecten van ASML"by Renee Raaijmakers, Techwatch Books, the development of a small company to world leading company. It started as part of Philips in Eindhoven and after a fairly long time it became an independent company with a large production facility in Veldhoven, The Netherlands.
The scientists and engineers come from all over the world to work there, so it becomes kind of difficult to find housing for them.
One of our PhD students and a postdoc went to work there and as far as I know, they still do.
One of the secrets of ASML's success (but there are quite a few) is the modular system with which the wafer stepper is built, so reairs are much easier and quicker than with other types of construction. For ASMl it was quite a job to get Zeiss so far that it was able to make the necessary optical components of sufficient quality.
Demands and precision of such high quality, that making the optical components for binoculars or cameras seems child play compared with this kind of optics.
Gijs van Ginkel
Thank you for that link, I'd love to see a book about ASML.
They are a remarkable enterprise indeed, coming from nowhere to be the critical supplier to the world electronics manufacturers.
The interesting aspect to me is that all their optics are mirror based, as lenses would absorb the frequencies they use. Perhaps their know how will trickle down to the consumer optics space and allow lighter, brighter designs.
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Old Sunday 3rd November 2019, 21:57   #6
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Originally Posted by dalethorn View Post
I bought a one terabyte MicroSD card from Sandisk when they were first released a few months ago. Fingernail sized, and able to store as much as 1500 hours of quality video for an iPad. I used it in a Leica "C-Lux" for awhile to test it, but I don't know ultimately reliable it is.

In 2009, Leica released the M9 camera, which was the smallest full-frame camera at that time. The sensor contained some kind of "micro lenses" which I presume were needed to bend the light to get onto the sensor in such a small body.

My memory of electronics in the 1970's had EPROMs being burnt by UV or similar light, but it would be a few more years until flash memory arrived, enabling read/write capability. When I was able to buy an 85 mb (mb!) PCMCIA card for my HP200LX pocket computer in the late 90's, for $2300 USD, that was quite a breakthrough!
That's a hefty price !

It is interesting to look back on advancements in Semi-Conductors and Moore's Law on our daily lives. The 6 year old phone that I type this on (virtually from anywhere I want) has more memory and a faster processor than the computer I had when starting higher degrees ...... and at half the cost too !

I expect my next phone (2020) will be a pocket sized computer twice as powerful, a very handy 16-80mm+ camera system, and a whole host of other functions (digital compass, music/video player etc) and able to send MMS and make calls too, plus even more (equipment controlled via apps and the IOT, etc) !

It should probably be mandatory for kids these days to have the old dial up connection sound as a ring tone with enforced 10 second delay just so that they can learn patience !





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Old Sunday 3rd November 2019, 22:05   #7
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Gijs (post#4) thanks for the title of that book. It is translated into English at least, and also Chinese.

All, I came across this interesting (/disturbing?) article copied from a Chinese 'chat' account which offered the view that the book took so long to write because there was nothing previously like it to copy !

A quite informative read as it says as much about the Chinese as it does a brief outline of the book:
https://technology-info.net/index.ph...d-100-million/






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Old Saturday 9th November 2019, 16:21   #8
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Chosun, post 7,
Thank you for the informative paper, it was interesting to read and compare it with the text of the book......
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