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Review of 8x25 Victory Pocket

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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 10:43   #1
Troubador
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Review of 8x25 Victory Pocket

Some years ago I had an unhappy experience with a pocket binocular having two loose hinges and one stiff focuser. I couldn’t move the latter without moving the former. It had to go and was replaced eventually by a Zeiss Victory Pocket 8x20 which was a much more satisfactory having only one firm hinge and a smooth, easy focuser. Much more recently Zeiss replaced the 8x20 with the Victory Pocket 8x25 and so did I. While I don’t use pocket binos as intensively as bigger binoculars I decided to do a mini-review of this compact newcomer.

The specification promises much as it surpasses the old 8x20 on two important counts: field of view is 130m/390’ compared with 118m/354’ and the official close focus is 1.9m/6.23’ compared with an official 2.6m/8.53’. I am indebted to Alexis for pointing out that he has measured the close focus of the old compact at 2.0 and in turn I have checked my Victory Pocket and is focuses down to 1.5m, so the official specifications are quite conservative. The Pocket also trounces Swarovski’s CL 8x25 whose field of view is almost exactly the same as the discontinued Zeiss Compact at 119m/357’ and it’s a similar story with the close focus with the CL at 2.5m/8.2’. Leica’s Ultravid 8x20 comes with the following: fov 113m/341’ and close focus 1.8m/6’.

But how compact are these pocket rockets? As it turns out the Swaro and Zeiss are fairly close at 110mm and 112mm respectively while as usual, Leica is the 'king of compact' at 93mm.

The retail prices in the UK show more differences though with the Zeiss the most expensive at 548 and the prices for the Swaro and Leica following almost in line with how their fields of view compare with the Zeiss at 515 for the Swarovski and 479 for the Leica. So if you take the price of the Leica and divide it by its fov in metres you find each metre costs 4.2389. Multiply this by the Zeiss’s 130m and you get 551 which is pretty close to the Zeiss’s street price of 548 which means, in field of view terms, you get your money’s worth with the Zeiss. A similar calculation for the Swaro would price it at 501 rather than its current street price over here of 515, but hey, Swaros have never been cheap.

Over in the USA things are very different. Here, the Zeiss is the least expensive at $750, with the Leica one step up at $779 and the Swarovski the dearest at $819.

What are the Zeiss’s like to use though? I would struggle to claim they looked brighter than the Victory 8x20s but my goodness what a difference the field of view makes. The old compacts had a fov of 6.73deg whereas the new pockets come in at 7.41deg. For a tourist these pockets put a lot of landscape or cityscape in front of your eyes and for me out on a marsh in east Suffolk, a huge amount of reed bed.

Scanning the tops of ancient oaks, still lacking leaves this early in the year, and checking for chromatic aberration against the bright but clouded sky, and I am struggling to find any. The merest scraping of it is there right at the edge of the field of view but this is a stellar performance.

Over the marsh, various Marsh Harriers were cruising at a medium height but over the wood on the hill called Dingle Dell there came a Common Buzzard. I really didn’t need to glass it as they are so familiar to us from a visits to Scotland, but I wanted to use the Pockets and my goodness I was glad that I did because the Buzzard performed a ‘sky dance’. This is where a bird of prey flies along then suddenly closes its wings and plummets down, only to spread them again and soar up to the same height on the momentum of the dive and then, without taking a breath they dive again, and again. The Buzzy did this 4 times in a row, something we have only seen once before and then it was performed by a Hen Harrier. The dark Buzzard didn’t have the slightest hint of CA as it switch-backed across the pale sky.

The following day, a glimpse out of our cottage’s back window revealed a Green Woodpecker on the ground only about 15 metres away digging in the sandy soil for ants and by the look of its tongue sliding back into its bill at intervals it was finding some. The nearest binos happened to be the Victory Pockets and through them the Woody’s black mask and vivid crimson crown and malar stripe were just stunning. Even its plain green plumage didn’t look plain at all but seemed full of subtle tones as the bird shifted, digging the ground like a manic pneumatic drill.

Using them like a tourist and having them in pocket or around my neck but tucked inside my gillet, they were light and with just the single hinge to manipulate they were quick on the draw.

The Pockets are an accomplished set of binoculars, bright and sharp, in fact for all practical purposes they were sharp right across the field and with excellent colour rendition and contrast. What’s not to like? The weird strap and the lack of a rainguard, that’s what, but these are easily remedied.

Folding pocket binos are still not my favourite format but these are excellent performers and worthy opponents of Swarovski’s excellent CL and Leica’s still-competitive Ultravid.


Lee

Note: Thanks to Alexis, the original text has been corrected in the light of new information concerning the close focus of the Victory Compact and Victory Pocket and the length of the Leica Ultravid.
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Last edited by Troubador : Tuesday 10th April 2018 at 17:08.
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 13:34   #2
Stephen Mark
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Lee
Thanks for the review it pretty much falls in line with other reviews that are out the most in depth being the Porters at Binoculars.com. Though half the weight of my Kowa 8x33 I don't think I will be puing down the 799.00 for a pair as I think eight pair is enough. I hope you enjoy them.
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 14:29   #3
Alexis Powell
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I'm quite interested in the new Zeiss Victory, so I'm not arguing against them being perhaps the best current choice in an 8x25, but a few quibbles w/details follow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Troubador View Post
...the close focus is 1.9m/6.23 compared with 2.6m/8.53...
The Zeiss spec on the old 8x20 is conservative. In practice, they close focus at least down to 2 m, not 2.6, so this isn't an improvement unless the new spec is also conservative. I'd be interested in what you measure it to be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Troubador View Post
...But how compact are these pocket rockets? As it turns out you can barely get a feeler gauge between them on length as they measure 110mm for the Swaro, 111mm for the Leica and 112mm for the Zeiss, so its fair to call them all approximately 4.4 long...
You must have the BCA Ultravid. I have the BL. I can't believe that the BCA is made as bulky by the rubber armor as you report. For the BL version, the length with eyecups down (as I use them) is 92.5 mm, and with the eyecups up, is 100 mm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Troubador View Post
...Over in the USA things are very different. Here, the Zeiss is the least expensive at $750, with the Leica one step up at $779 and the Swarovski the dearest at $819.
The good thing about the Leica is that here and there and from time to time they turn up on steep discount, but I've not seen the same for the Zeiss (yet!). I bought one BL for $600 and a second for $400, both new and USA warranty.

--AP
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 17:00   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexis Powell View Post
I'm quite interested in the new Zeiss Victory, so I'm not arguing against them being perhaps the best current choice in an 8x25, but a few quibbles w/details follow.


The Zeiss spec on the old 8x20 is conservative. In practice, they close focus at least down to 2 m, not 2.6, so this isn't an improvement unless the new spec is also conservative. I'd be interested in what you measure it to be.

You must have the BCA Ultravid. I have the BL. I can't believe that the BCA is made as bulky by the rubber armor as you report. For the BL version, the length with eyecups down (as I use them) is 92.5 mm, and with the eyecups up, is 100 mm.

The good thing about the Leica is that here and there and from time to time they turn up on steep discount, but I've not seen the same for the Zeiss (yet!). I bought one BL for $600 and a second for $400, both new and USA warranty.

--AP
Hi Alex

As you guessed, the close focus figures are the officially published ones. I just checked the Pocket 8x25 and this unit focuses to 1.5m.

The length or height of the Leica Ultravid was also taken from official figures: 111 x 93 x 39 mm, but you are correct. My assumption that the biggest figure was the length is wrong, that is the width (?) and 93mm is the length.

I have corrected the text of the review with an acknowledgement to yourself.

Good luck with the discounts! Hope you get one. Do Zeiss not do special offers at shows and other events?

Lee

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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 17:22   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troubador View Post
...The length or height of the Leica Ultravid was also taken from official figures: 111 x 93 x 39 mm, but you are correct. My assumption that the biggest figure was the length is wrong, that is the width (?) and 93mm is the length.

I have corrected the text of the review with an acknowledgement to yourself.

Good luck with the discounts! Hope you get one. Do Zeiss not do special offers at shows and other events?

Lee
The 1.5 m close focus should make the Zeiss 8x25 Victory good for butterflies. That's one of my favorite uses of pocket roofs because they work nicely in full sun.

Yes, looking at my Leica 8x20, it seems they are 111 mm wide when set at maximum IPD of ~73.5 mm.

Don't know about Zeiss discounts at shows (which I avoid, and are rarely if ever in my region), but they did used to have a nice discount for students (that wasn't ever very well advertised) which they might still have (no longer applies to me).

--AP
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 18:03   #6
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Lee, thank you for the review.

Quote:
But how compact are these pocket rockets? As it turns out the Swaro and Zeiss are fairly close at 110mm and 112mm respectively...
For a binocular"compact" also means light and the Swaro. is I reckon significantly heavier. For a binocular carried in a shirt or pants pocket I should think that for most people the 290 grams of the Zeiss is about the limit and the 345 grams of the Swaro. too much. I would like to know others' experiences and opinions also on this, thanks. The Nikon Premier/HG 10x25 is about 290 grams and the Leica Ultravid 10x25 rubber-armored version is 270 grams.

Quote:
What are the Zeiss’s like to use though? I would struggle to claim they looked brighter than the Victory 8x20s but my goodness what a difference the field of view makes. The old compacts had a fov of 6.73deg whereas the new pockets come in at 7.41deg. For a tourist these pockets put a lot of landscape or cityscape in front of your eyes and for me out on a marsh in east Suffolk, a huge amount of reed bed.
This striking difference may also be due to ease of view. I gather that the 8x20 was pretty good in this respect but the new Pocket is outstanding.

Lee, as a favor could you please check how well the new model conveys faint pink hues? Sorry I cannot suggest suitable subjects! Thank you!
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 18:25   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adhoc View Post
...For a binocular"compact" also means light and the Swaro. is I reckon significantly heavier. For a binocular carried in a shirt or pants pocket I should think that for most people the 290 grams of the Zeiss is about the limit and the 345 grams of the Swaro. too much. I would like to know others' experiences and opinions also on this, thanks. The Nikon Premier/HG 10x25 is about 290 grams and the Leica Ultravid 10x25 rubber-armored version is 270 grams...
Yes, for me weight is an important consideration given how I use my pocket roofs, at least sometimes. When butterflying and doing photography at the same time, I like to wear my Leica 8x20 BL on a neckstrap, and tuck them into a front shirt pocket (while still on the neck strap) to keep them restrained when not using them (often while also leaning forward with my camera at a butterfly). Their slim profile and light weight makes that a more comfortable prospect than with other bins.

FYI, the Leica 8x20 Ultravid BL with Leica supplied neckstrap = 233 g (the neckstrap probably weighs only 3-4 g).

--AP
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 19:18   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adhoc View Post

Lee, as a favor could you please check how well the new model conveys faint pink hues? Sorry I cannot suggest suitable subjects! Thank you!
Hi

As it happens we have some crockery with some gentle pink flowers on them and the Pockets captured those perfectly. As a stiffer test I then had a look at a vintage embroided table cloth which covers a folding table set within a large window. On the 'room side' of this cloth the pinks are very delicate and on the 'window side' they have been faded by the sunlight, but the Pockets had no difficulty in picking up both of them.

Are there any more obscure colour tones I should test for?

Lee
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 19:28   #9
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it could be equated to the on-axis quality of the Pocket Zeiss 8X25 (exceptional contrast,sharp and bright..)with that of its older brothers, Zeiss Victory FL 8X42 / 10X42 models ?
What is the eye relief of the Zeiss Pocket 8X25, ther is the possibility os the blackout issues ?
Thank you.
Paul
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Old Tuesday 10th April 2018, 23:30   #10
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Thanks for the review, Lee. I tried the Zeiss 8x25 last fall and agree it's very appealing, especially the FOV. The single hinge works well, the focuser is very nice. Two things ruled it out for me: eyecups not deep enough for the huge eye relief (and pretty small to work well anyway), and fairly obvious defects in both pairs I got (coating defects in one, metal sliver inside the barrel of the other). If you plan to wear eyeglasses and take care to find an acceptable copy, it could be a great choice.
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Old Wednesday 11th April 2018, 01:24   #11
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I had a very similar experience as Tenex my Colorado neighbor with the Zeiss 8x25. The eyecups were not near deep enough for the eye relief for me and it had too much free play in the focuser. I think if the eye cups work for you and you found a good one they would be a nice choice. I think if you have shallower eye sockets like me it is something to check out.

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Old Wednesday 11th April 2018, 04:07   #12
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Quote:
...crockery with some gentle pink flowers...Pockets captured those perfectly. As a stiffer test...On the 'room side' of this cloth the pinks are very delicate and on the 'window side' they have been faded by the sunlight, but the Pockets had no difficulty in picking up both of them.
Thank you, Lee, that is useful to me. The explanation about that color is on this page (link) of a thread on the FL, in the posts by Looksharp65 and me.

Quote:
Are there any more obscure colour tones I should test for?
Well now that you mention it... I will think them up and duly follow with more demands :-)
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Old Wednesday 11th April 2018, 06:55   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wachipilotes View Post
it could be equated to the on-axis quality of the Pocket Zeiss 8X25 (exceptional contrast,sharp and bright..)with that of its older brothers, Zeiss Victory FL 8X42 / 10X42 models ?
What is the eye relief of the Zeiss Pocket 8X25, ther is the possibility os the blackout issues ?
Thank you.
Paul
Hi Paul
The Victory Pocket certainly exceeds the quality of the Conquest HD models especially with respect to control of chromatic aberration but I would hesitate to say they reach FL42 levels, mainly because I don't have an FL42 to compare them with. They have FL lenses which explains the excellent CA control, but being pocket-sized and having SP prisms instead of AK prisms like the FL42s means comparisons aren't useful. But I think I know what you are really asking and I would say that anyone who has an FL42 would not be disappointed by the Victory Pocket 8x25.

I wear spectacles and found no blackout issues at all. Zeiss quote 16.5mm for the eye relief. If you don't wear spectacles then you are likely to experience the same problems with the Pockets as other ultra-compact folding binos which is that the eyecup diameter is so small that it is very easy to push it into your eye sockets too far and so lead to all kinds of blackouts. This can be avoided by using the MOLCET technique of bracing the upper curve of the eyecups against the undercurve of your eyebrow ridge, and I found this very easy with the Pockets. Doing this gave reliable and easy views when using them without spectacles.

Lee

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Old Wednesday 11th April 2018, 14:59   #14
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Lee, thank you for your interesting reply.
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Old Sunday 15th April 2018, 09:38   #15
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I've had them for a couple of months now, very happy with them. The only comment I have is that the focus wheel has a little bit more resistance when I move it to focus further than closer. I couldn't tell of that was always the case and I don't want to go through the hassle of sending them to have them checked as it is not a big problem.
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Old Sunday 15th April 2018, 15:59   #16
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A belated thank you for your report - I couldn‘t agree more with almost everything you say, including the advantages of the single hinge and the lack of proper strap and rainguard.
Canip

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Old Thursday 3rd May 2018, 05:43   #17
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Perhaps one of the great bins of all time

I've been interested in the Zeiss 8x25 Victory Pocket model since it was announced, primarily because of its FOV and eye-relief spec in such a small binocular. Also indispensable for me in a small bin is close focus (which I measure at <1.6 m) and low mass (which I measure as just under 287 g). When EuroOptics ran a site-wide sale recently (13% off most items), I couldn't resist the purchase. Here are my thoughts after a week of use.

What can I say? Fantastic! Really unbelievable. I lift it to my eyes (with eyeglasses) and BOOM, it delivers the view. Everything is there. The view is as wide or wider than many a standard size 8x, with all the nearly-neutral saturated color and superb contrast one would expect in a decent bin with modern coatings, and it is projected to so high an eye point (despite the rather generous raised lip of rubber around the ocular lenses after twisting down the eyecups) that the full view is presented with a crisp edge, not the tapering fade of deteriorating contrast seen in bins with insufficient eye-relief or in many pocket-roof type bins regardless. Moreover, eye placement is forgiving, so being a bit off doesn't result in pathological increases in astigmatism (as seen in Zeiss 8x32 FL or Zeiss 8x25 Terra ED), nor does looking around the view induce blackouts. I still find it hard to believe that a bin this size can have this combination of FOV and eye-relief spec. It's a restful and easy view. Focus speed is rapid, and proper focus is unambiguous and easily obtained yet oddly forgiving because the bins deliver superb detail even before the adjustment has been fully optimized, as if they have sharpness to spare.

Again, contrast across the field is fantastically uniform, as is resolution/sharpness by binocular standards. The FOV of ~390 ft, with just a touch of field curvature (= big sweet spot without having a truly flat field), a bit of lateral CA off-axis, and with just a trace of astigmatism (if you really look for it) at the edge of the view is of superb overall quality, and for me is completely unexpected in a bin this size. At the same time, it is so familiar that I've been asking "Where have I see this view before?" Answer: in the Leica 8x32 BA/BN/Ultravid series, except that this bin has better eye-relief and is substantially smaller and lighter. I've always argued that the Leica 8x32 roof models (currently, the 8x32 Ultravid HD+) were the smallest binoculars with big binocular performance. I never thought a bin of a smaller format would inspire such a claim, but I'm almost ready (only hesitating because I haven't tested it long term under enough conditions) to award that title to the Zeiss 8x25 Victory Pocket. Incidentally, I find the Zeiss 8x25 Victory a _way_ better bin than the Zeiss 8x25 Terra ED, which has _much_ inferior optics (e.g. lots of off-axis astigmatism) and handling. The Terra is an OK budget choice for a largish pocket roof (with some additional merits of having very close focus, proper sized strap lugs, and being supplied with a well-designed clamshell case), but I don't think its view could be mistaken for that of a top-end 8x32 (as I think is possible for the Victory).

My biases are such that I prefer to use full-sized bins whenever possible. These days, I almost always use the Swarovski 8.5x42 EL SV. Nevertheless, I use other formats for their pack sizes (or other specs or special design features) when needed, and I'm not afraid to use my Leica 8x20 Ultravid BL as a primary bin when traveling super light, or when butterflies rather than birds are my primary quarry. Small bins _can_ deliver for critical birding, but to get that performance one _does_ confront trade-offs in ease of use, to the extent that I am loathe even to use 8x32 bins if circumstances allow carrying full-sized. I'm a fan of big exit pupils and the easy view, so I'm surprised to find myself now arguing that the Zeiss 8x25 Victory Pocket deserves to be put in the category of "bins with an easy view", regardless of size, but I think it does. It is so good, I think it will now be my go-to bin when I need something smaller than my Swarovski 8.5x42 EL SV. For the past 10+ years, when I've needed a smaller bin, I've generally used either my Leica 8x20 Ultravid BL when pack size was most critical or my viewing uses limited, or else when I needed full-sized bin overall capability in smaller bin, or a bin for serious butterflying+birding, I've used the Zeiss 8x32 FL (its close focus, rapid yet precise focus, compact size, low CA, and eye-relief being critical specs for me). The Zeiss 8x25 Victory is intermediate in size between those two bins and may replace them both for many of my purposes. In weight, it is much closer to the Leica, and if put in a close-fitting case is almost the same size as the Leica in its custom hard leather clamshell, so given the advantages of its FOV and ease of use, it presents an attractive alternative when smallest possible size is not the highest priority. The Zeiss 8x32 FL has a robustness that is hard to match, so it might still be the best choice for some rough-and-tumble travel and field situations, but it doesn't have an easy view (which is why I have such a love-hate orientation to what is otherwise such a capable bin), and I'm especially irritated by the amount of off-axis astigmatism that it displays, even when one's eyes are perfectly positioned. I think the 8x25 Victory may replace it in many circumstances around home and for much general travel.

With respect to handling, I find the Zeiss 8x25 Victory nearly a perfect fit, with nice wrap-around space for the ring fingers and little fingers of both hands (By comparison, the connecting bridge of the Zeiss 8x20 Victory Compact is both proportionally and absolutely longer, preventing such a grip). The reach to the (reasonably large) focus knob with right hand is bit on the long side, which inspires more finger tip manipulation than the rapid rolling with full finger pad than I prefer. Fortunately, the focus is rapid, very easy, and silky smooth (whereas the Zeiss 8x20 Victory Compact focus knob is hard, narrow, and can be a bit stiff) with no slop, so it is quite easy to focus rapidly regardless. One's middle finger can be used instead, but doing so disrupts the perfection of the grip for me. Ironically (given that it derives from a design meant originally for the right-handed), the 8x25 appears better suited to rapid rolling using the index finger of the _left_ hand, which has a shorter and reasonably ergonomically appropriate reach (In the Zeiss 8x20 Victory Compact, the reach to the focus with left hand is _too_ short to be functional, but in this model, perhaps because of the wider barrels, the bridge is wider, including the left side of the bridge).

With respect to design and styling, I find the Victory well-integrated, simple, and understated, like many top-end bins. My unit seems well assembled and it is clean on the inside. Hinge tension is excellent. We'll see how it holds up. The objectives are nicely recessed to protect them from stratches when being cased. One quirk of this model is that the optical assemblies of the two barrels appear to be identical. In other words, rather than being manufactured as mirror images of one another (or oriented 90 degrees to one another, as in some pocket roofs), the components of the telescope of the left side are oriented (esp. when set to my IPD) the same as the right. For example, two false exit pupils are seen to the right of the exit pupil in both barrels, rather than to the right on one side and the left on the other. Likewise, the faintly visible prism lines are oriented at essentially the same angle. I've never seen a bin made like this before. I assume it cuts the cost of production substantially.

What's wrong with the Zeiss 8x25 Victory Pocket? It has the worst designed strap lugs I've ever seen in a bin. Unbelievably bad. They are _way_ too small and can only accept something so small as micro-loops used e.g. to attach leashes to compact cameras. I hate those loops and their hard plastic connectors. I don't understand why so many current pocket cameras, and this bin (!) aren't designed with proper lugs. The Leica 8x20 Ultravid, Zeiss 8x20 Victory Compact, and Zeiss 8x25 Terra ED all have lugs to accept a standard mini-strap, so why not this bin! Ugh! In the past (and as is still found on many current full-sized cameras), when designers wanted to keep lugs small, they used hardened steel lugs that could be used with triangular split rings to accept a standard width strap. No such luck here. I'm not sure what type of metal composes the Zeiss 8x25 Victory lugs, but if it is magnesium alloy, I don't think using steel split rings would be a good idea. Even if it is steel, the lugs are oriented the wrong way, so the split rings won't lie flat. Ugh! The Victory has good "hang", but I think it could be slightly improved (esp. for users with narrow IPD) by moving the lugs a bit more to the sides, and I suggest asymmetrically moving the one on the left more to the side than the one on the right, so that when the bin is folded (asymmetrically, due to hinge design) to set IPD, it comes out a bit more symmetrical in the end. One last design aspect of dubious merit: for whatever reason, the metal border around each ocular has a generous gap between it and the glass. Seems like lint and sand could get in there and that it might cause problems when cleaning the oculars. Haven't done that yet.

Moving on to accessories. No objective caps are supplied, nor is an ocular guard. These can be handy to protect the lenses when a pocket bin is carried in a pack with other items, so I can't understand why they aren't provided. How much would a few such bits of plastic cost??? The Zeiss 8x25 Victory Pocket is supplied with a nice neoprene strap, but it is quite bulky and not good for anyone selecting this bin for small pack size. I prefer very minimalist straps with non-scratching hardware, so I'm not happy with all the little fiddly and hard bits (loop connectors, buckles, sliders, rings) used in this too-complicated strap. I ended up fashioning my own strap from a length of soft 1.5 cm wide flattened tubular nylon webbing, with a length of thin black synthetic shoelace on each end (to slip through the ultra small lugs, then knot at the end to keep it from slipping back through). The clamshell case that comes with this bin is a joke. It is almost large enough to accept my Zeiss 8x32 FL, it only fits the Victory when the hinge is set at maximum IPD, and it has a LOT of wasted (unless you want to cram several of those bulky neoprene neck straps in there!) space between the barrels. Ridiculous! Instead, I am using the case for a Nikon 8x25 SportStar IV. It is a perfect fit, and can be used with the strap out (to serve as a strap) or folded up and tucked into the case with the bin. I'll be ordering an ocular guard (maybe from Opticron) to protect the lenses and keep them dust free when the bin is cased, since they are only covered by a folded-over flap.

Well, I guess that's all I have to report or critique!

--AP

Last edited by Alexis Powell : Thursday 3rd May 2018 at 06:06.
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Old Thursday 3rd May 2018, 07:38   #18
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Great report as usual Alexis and all the more valuable because of your experience with small format binos. The fiddly strap and lugs and lack of a rainguard are a shame considering the capabilities of the bino itself.

Like you I can see this bino getting more use than the previous Vic Compact.

Lee
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Old Thursday 3rd May 2018, 15:00   #19
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Alexis,
Would you be tempted to leave at home and for general observations the Zeiss 8x32, and take the little Victory 8x25?
In your opinion have these two binoculars more coincidences than differences?
Thank you very much
Wachi
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Old Thursday 3rd May 2018, 16:12   #20
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I would be curious to know what any left-handed birders think of this offset design....
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Old Thursday 3rd May 2018, 18:33   #21
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Alexis, Would you be tempted to leave at home and for general observations the Zeiss 8x32, and take the little Victory 8x25?...
Yes, that's what I tried to say in my big review. I think this 8x25 can replace a top-end 8x32 for most applications.

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...In your opinion have these two binoculars more coincidences than differences?
Thank you very much
Wachi
No, I think the Zeiss 8x32 FL and 8x25 Victory Pocket have _extremely_ different optical "personalities", and I like the 8x25 better. The view of the 8x25 Victory, in almost all respects, is more similar to the Leica 8x32 models than it is to the Zeiss 8x32 FL. The off-axis astigmatism and sensitivity to eye position of the 8x32 FL is more similar to the Zeiss 8x25 Terra ED (but in many other respects, e.g. FOV, those two bins are quite different).

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I would be curious to know what any left-handed birders think of this offset design...
Well, as I noted, I think they work quite well left-handed, in fact in some ways better than right-handed (esp. for those with small hands). I'm not left-handed, but I do a lot of things left-handed because I am left-eyed. The older 8x20 model did not work well left handed because the bridge was much shorter overall, placing the focus under the right index finger and too close to the left.

--AP
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Old Friday 4th May 2018, 06:40   #22
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I carry mine with me everyday now in my jacket pocket. I replaced the supplied strap with the excellent lightweight one supplied with the Leica Trinovid 8x20. I think it works better eyeglass wearers like myself. I’ve used it to view an Anna’s hummingbird 2m away, or a Great Egret 200m away in a drizzle, and it performed flawlessly in both cases.
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Old Friday 4th May 2018, 13:51   #23
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Well, as I noted, I think they work quite well left-handed, in fact in some ways better than right-handed (esp. for those with small hands). I'm not left-handed, but I do a lot of things left-handed because I am left-eyed. The older 8x20 model did not work well left handed because the bridge was much shorter overall, placing the focus under the right index finger and too close to the left.

--AP[/quote]
I should have read that bit more closely!
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Old Friday 4th May 2018, 14:15   #24
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..and for non eyeglass wearers, how its ?
Wachi.
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Old Friday 4th May 2018, 14:46   #25
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..and for non eyeglass wearers, how its ?
Wachi.
It will have the usual pocket roof problem of eyecups that are too small in diameter to be comfortable (since they fit inside the orbit rather than around it). Also, there is the (these days all too common) risk (depending on your face shape) that the eyecups will be too short.

--AP

Last edited by Alexis Powell : Friday 4th May 2018 at 14:50.
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