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What Bird Names Would You Change?

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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 00:35   #76
bkrownd
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'red-bellied woodpecker' should be renamed 'red-capped' or 'vermillion-capped' woodpecker.

On the lighter side, 'kinglets' should be renamed 'cuties' - e.g. ruby-crowned cutie.

Japanese white-eye should be renamed 'tittering little cowardly bastards'.
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 01:54   #77
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Why is using 'American' such a bad descriptor for some of these really 'classic' North American species? Should we also change all birds that are named after a continent? 'Australian' or 'Asian' etc.

Carlos
Because this thread is meant to be light hearted and fun!!!...........but I see now that fugl had beaten me to the punch anyhow so
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 02:26   #78
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'cos the majority of the planet ( regretfully ) considers 'American' to be the sole preserve of the USA, so leaving the much larger Canada and a huge chunk of Mexico out in the cold. 'American' is the Nearctic version of that supporating carbuncle on the English language 'Eurasian'. IMO Chris
Oh dear, Chris, might have gone with you for your first sentence alone, but 'Eurasian' is an incredibly apt portmanteau word... unless you can find a better single-word geographic descriptor that is also nicely vague but leaves no doubt about breeding distributions?
MJB
PS I bet you've already noticed it should be 'suppurating'...
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 12:51   #79
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With this in mind;

Red-flanked Bluetail - Orange-sided Chat
Already called Orange-flanked Bush Robin by some (keeping it consistent with other Tarsigers).

And Redstart for Myioborus? Seriously? Surely it has to be Whitestart. I know a lot of folk already use this more sensible name, but it would be good to see Redstart officially consigned to the dustbin for these guys.

James
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 13:23   #80
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Originally Posted by J.W.Ray View Post
Because this thread is meant to be light hearted and fun!!!...........but I see now that fugl had beaten me to the punch anyhow so
I guess the joke went right over my head.

Carlos
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 13:25   #81
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Chris

Oh, and change Chickadee to Tit in line with the rest of the world ( I know those in the colonies consider the word Tit to mean only one thing - or two - but, come on. We are all adults now - aren't we??????? )

C

I'm not including myself in that last statement, by the way

C
Chris,

Only if you people in Palearctic are willing to change your 'divers' to 'loons'...

Carlos
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 14:45   #82
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Yup, I agree. Almost all Americanisms are a savage injury to our language, but I do like "loons" (and "chickadees").
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 19:50   #83
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Peregrine falcon - why not just peregrine?
Semipalmated sandpiper and plover - everyone calls them semi sand/sandpiper and semi plover, something shorter is needed
Red-bellied woodpecker - So many people call them red-headed woodpecker, maybe zebra woodpecker
Caspian Tern - found on every continent!
All the species named for a single location - philadelphia vireo, a bunch of warblers
American redstart- American orangestart

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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 20:20   #84
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Originally Posted by bkrownd View Post
'red-bellied woodpecker' should be renamed 'red-capped' or 'vermillion-capped' woodpecker.
I've always hated that name. It's redDISH bellied at most.
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Old Wednesday 30th November 2011, 22:05   #85
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Semipalmated sandpiper and plover - everyone calls them semi sand/sandpiper and semi plover, something shorter is needed
Webbed Sandpiper / Plover? A bit over the top for those barely visible webs, but that's one way of recognising them... (Half-webbed sounds decidedly odd).
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 00:01   #86
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I've always hated that name. It's redDISH bellied at most.
maybe buffy-bellied
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 01:16   #87
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I'd also like to bring back Zeledonia for Wrenthrush
I didn't know they'd taken it away. It'll be forever Zeledonia to me.
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 02:09   #88
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Webbed Sandpiper / Plover? A bit over the top for those barely visible webs, but that's one way of recognising them... (Half-webbed sounds decidedly odd).
How about Semi-webbed Sandpiper/Plover? Oh, wait...

Carlos
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 06:28   #89
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Originally Posted by bkrownd View Post
'red-bellied woodpecker' should be renamed 'red-capped' or 'vermillion-capped' woodpecker. On the lighter side, 'kinglets' should be renamed 'cuties' - e.g. ruby-crowned cutie. Japanese white-eye should be renamed 'tittering little cowardly bastards'.
All good stuff, but 'vermilion' surely - nothing to do with 7-digit numbers...
MJB
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 07:28   #90
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All good stuff, but 'vermilion' surely - nothing to do with 7-digit numbers...
Carlos recently noted that common slip...
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 07:55   #91
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Carlos recently noted that common slip...
Don't mind coming second to Carlos at all!
MJB
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 08:29   #92
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I absolutely agree with Richard regarding those evocative eponyms.

I've always disliked 'Accentor' and would replace it with 'Dunnock' for all except Alpine Accentor.

As for 'Common' I'm not convinced with the proposed link to common land as suggested by Hotspur. Common also has the meaning 'ordinary' or even 'undistinguished' and I think this is the meaning here rather than 'frequent.
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 08:58   #93
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I've always disliked 'Accentor' and would replace it with 'Dunnock' for all except Alpine Accentor.

As for 'Common' I'm not convinced with the proposed link to common land as suggested by Hotspur. Common also has the meaning 'ordinary' or even 'undistinguished' and I think this is the meaning here rather than 'frequent.
I like the Dunnock idea, why not for Alpine though?

And lets replace "Common" with "Pleb" in all cases.

James
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 11:35   #94
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Chris,

Only if you people in Palearctic are willing to change your 'divers' to 'loons'...

Carlos
OK............................ but.................... Sparrows are Passer, Warblers are Old World, Blackbirds are Turdus merula and.................

Chris
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 12:14   #95
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PS I bet you've already noticed it should be 'suppurating'...
No chance of correct spelling when I'm in full rant mode ( or when the colonials are around )

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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 14:05   #96
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OK............................ but.................... Sparrows are Passer, Warblers are Old World, Blackbirds are Turdus merula and.................

Chris
Ok, so we'll call our sparrows buntings... however, we get to keep using warblers because... well, quite frankly... ours are so much nicer. So the old world birds get to be 'Sylvias' or 'Acros' or whatever you are already calling them. Plus, all your warblers are a heterogeneous hodgepodge of different bird families, anyways, so it makes perfect sense to me to make a big rehaul.

Don't you like the ring of Dartford Sylvia or Clamorous Reed-Acro or even Cetti's Cettia?

Carlos
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 14:13   #97
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As for 'Common' I'm not convinced with the proposed link to common land as suggested by Hotspur. Common also has the meaning 'ordinary' or even 'undistinguished' and I think this is the meaning here rather than 'frequent.
My understanding has always been that "Common Gull" & "Common Sandpiper" were so named because, unlike most other gulls and sandpipers in the UK, they were "common" inland as well as on the coast.
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 14:36   #98
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There was a time when Lear's Macaw was changed to the blander Indigo Macaw, i'm glad to see it's been changed back!

Same with Chestnut-eared Finch for Zebra Finch which has again been changed back now the Timor subspecies has been re-lumped with the Australian subspecies.
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 14:38   #99
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My understanding has always been that "Common Gull" & "Common Sandpiper" were so named because, unlike most other gulls and sandpipers in the UK, they were "common" inland as well as on the coast.
I think that's right.

I have to say that 'Common Gull' is not the most apt name, but it is far better than the plain ugly 'Mew Gull'!
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Old Thursday 1st December 2011, 15:27   #100
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I think that's right.

I have to say that 'Common Gull' is not the most apt name, but it is far better than the plain ugly 'Mew Gull'!
Agreed not a very euphonious name, but it is an interesting one, since "mew" is simply an archaic word for "gull". "Mew Gull", therefore, equals "Gull Gull", i.e. the "ordinary" or "common" gull, the one that most people not living on the coast saw most frequently. I for one would be very sad to see quirky names of this sort disappear, however "ugly".
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