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Birding parlance

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Old Thursday 24th April 2003, 22:38   #26
dennis
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Here is one you twitchers may have heard....

First sighting of a new bird for you......"LIFER!!!!"
Second sighting.............."ah, Junkbird"

Of course we say it kiddingly.

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Old Thursday 24th April 2003, 23:17   #27
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Crikey, what a veritable can of worms I've opened up with this one! Many thanks for responses so far - some fascinating stuff indeed.
Hailing originally from the Mansfield area (Notts), it was definitely 'spuggies' for me.

Delved deep into the lumber room of my memory and have recalled one or two from my UK birding days:

"Masher" - Marsh harrier;
"Gypo" - Egyptian goose (not terribly PC);
"John Craven" - Raven;
"Tart's tick" - common (ish) bird that you haven't seen.

Haven't heard too many Aussie ones, but I'm sure they're out there being uttered somewhere.

Cheers,
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 08:26   #28
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So it is Spadgers in Sheffield and throught to Rotherham, where Diane is - I wonder where between Rotherham and Barnsley/Doncaster it changes to Spuggies? Mexborough, perhaps?
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 10:31   #29
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Eee bye gum, ecky thump.
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 11:24   #30
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Another Americanism I've thought of, that's at least used in the midwest and south, is calling the Woodcock 'bogsucker'.

I've dusted off my old used copy of "The Dictionary of American Bird Names" by Ernest Choate, and have found, among other things:

ACCENTOR: Local name for the Ovenbird, for the penetrating two-syllable song in which the first syllable is accented: TEACH-er, TEACH-er, TEACH-er

BALDPATE: American Widgeon (the white forehead patch resembling baldness)

BASKETBIRD: Baltimore or Northern Oriole, whose nest resembles a basket hanging from a branch

BOGBUMPER: American Bittern, probably for its call

BURGOMASTER: Great Black-Backed Gull, for its large, dominating size

CHEWINK: Towhee, for its call

CUTWATER: Black Skimmer, for how its bill is cutting through water as it feeds

GOBBLER: Wild Turkey, for its call

HELL-DIVER: Grebes, particularly the Pied-Bill

LOG-COCK: Pileated Woodpecker

LORD GOD BIRD: Ivory-Billed Woodpecker, supposedly because its rare sighting and large size would cause people to exclaim, "Lord God, the Bird!"

MUD-HEN: A coot. And there's a baseball team in Toledo, Ohio that calls itself the Mudhens!! Klinger would wear their jerseys on M*A*S*H

RAIN-BIRD: American Cuckoos

REED BIRD: Bobolink, for where they congregate, especially in the Middle Atlantic states, before fall migration

SAWBILL: Mergansers (divers) for their serrated bills

SNAKE BIRD: Anhinga (for which I've also heard WATER TURKEY)

THUNDER PUMPER: American Bittern, for its call

TIMBER DOODLE: Still another for the Woodcock

WHISKY JAY: Common, local name for the Gray Jay
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 13:39   #31
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Andrew.

"Dip out must be a pure birding term as it is not in my dictionary of Idioms."

Have to disagree with you there mate as "dip out" or"dipped out" meaning to miss out on something, was quite a common expression down here at least as far back as the 70's.
Possibly an old hippy term. (Not that I would know about such things of course!)
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 14:10   #32
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Quote:
Originally posted by Michael Frankis
Easy - you don't pronounce 'accentor' . . just stick with Dunnock!

Michael
Alpine Dunnock (nice bird!) seems to be pushing it a bit--though I agree that it's better than hedge accentor. Still don't know how to pronounce it!
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 14:21   #33
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Hi Surreybirder, i thought someone would have told you how to pronounce accentor by now - this thread is enormous!
Phonetically, it would be spelled:
Ack Sent Or
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 15:04   #34
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Another very useful one ..

Pine Crossbill
Equals {Parrot + Scottish} Crossbill, since unless you've got a recording and sound analysis setup, you can't tell them apart

As opposed to Spruce Crossbill (= Common Crossbill). In both cases, the names derived from their favoured food trees.

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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 20:31   #35
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Have you had many grippos, Kevin?!!!!!
 
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 20:32   #36
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I've heard that in the north east one name for a starling is stinker. In parts of Yorkshire it is a Shep.


Abbreviations
Mipit for Meadow Pipit(I'm afraid I use this one)
Pecky for Pectoral Sandpiper.


I like Bonxie for Great Skua.


When in doubt a Commic Tern.
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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 20:46   #37
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It seems that 'Spadger' or 'Sparrer' or 'Spadgick' are used pretty well throughout England, whereas 'Spuggie' is mostly a northern term. In the south-east it can be 'Sparr'.
Probably all derived from variations on Old Norse 'sporr', Old German 'sparo', Middle English 'sparewe', or Old English 'sparwa'.

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Old Friday 25th April 2003, 20:51   #38
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Kevin

No wonder you RM's are lifelong friends - you speak an entirely different language to the rest of us!
 
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Old Saturday 26th April 2003, 18:01   #39
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Hi all,
RB Fly,Buff-B,Semi-P,Tripit etc are yet more commonly used abreviations,there's loads more!
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Old Saturday 26th April 2003, 18:07   #40
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Bristol Birder. Strange, I have never come across it before birding. Thanks for mentioning that.

You all can't read what I call Starlings! It's unprintable!
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Old Sunday 27th April 2003, 09:11   #41
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Quote:
Originally posted by simondix

I like Bonxie for Great Skua.

Any Gaelic speakers on this forum?
I think that bonxie is the Gaelic name for great skua; as is trystie for black guillemot and erne for sea eagle.

On the line of bird names for humans:
You crazy coot!
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Old Sunday 27th April 2003, 11:08   #42
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In Lancashire rural folk refer to Starlings as Shevy's , Chaffinches are Chuffers , but by far the best term I have heard was used to refer to gulls, when asked about the mass of Herring Gull "races/splitsetc"one birder just simply said he had no interest in looking at "slurry surfers and tip scramblers!!!!"
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Old Sunday 27th April 2003, 12:39   #43
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Slurry surfers, a great name!

I wish they did not clean up the sewage outlets at the coasts as they apperently brought loads of rare gulls.
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Old Sunday 27th April 2003, 12:41   #44
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Don't go down to Newquay then Andrew...........you'll be lynched by the human surfers!
 
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Old Sunday 27th April 2003, 15:07   #45
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That is amazing, we are telepathic. I was thinking of Towan Head in Newquay. I went there last year following the instructions of a book and found they had cleaned it up so it was birdless on the day! Darn surfers, the human kind!
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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 07:04   #46
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Hey, Bev! Your dictionary left out "pond poodle" -- for black-neck stilts. Ostensibly for the incessant "yapping" they do whenever humans or other sources of disturbance are around.

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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 12:00   #47
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We have, amongst others:

'frets' - bronze mannikins
'Piet-my-vrou' - redchested cuckoo
'butcherbird' or 'Jackie Hangman' - fiscal shrike
'bottlebird' or 'rainbird' - Burchell's coucal
'Wille' - sombre bulbul
'Toppie' - blackeyed bulbul
'Mossie' - sparrow
'Go-away bird - grey lourie
'Sakabula' - Paradise Whydah (when in plumage)
'Thickknees' - spotted dikkop
'Coly' - mousebird
Kiewietjie' - crowned plover
'Kelkiewyn' - Namaqua sandgrouse

and any small brown bird (especially the cisitcolas) are known as 'tinktinkies'.

Many of these names are based on the sound made by the bird, some on behaviour and some on appearance and actually, none of them have ever bothered me!
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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 14:38   #48
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Some of the terms mentioned by Surreybirder (tystie and ernie) as possibly Gaelic are probably Old Norse, i.e. Icelandic. the modern Icelandic for Black Guillemot is "teista" and generically for eagle "örn."

Talk of Commic Terns reminds me that I saw plenty of Crekla Larks in Spain last week.
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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 15:03   #49
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In Lincolnshire the Dunnock is always known as Cuddy
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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 16:07   #50
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Is Craven anything to do with Lincolnshire cos I have a book that says Cuddy is the word for Dunnock in an area called Craven.
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