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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 16:08   #51
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This thread is very interesting and I have bought an old book on this kind of thing. I will post a thread in the Books forum with possibility of a new competition.
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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 18:31   #52
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Cuddy is what we called Dunnocks when I was a lad back in West Yorks as well
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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 18:34   #53
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Following on from my earlier post about Sparrows being called Spogs where I grew up Sparrowhawks were of course called in the local dialect "spog'orks"
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Old Monday 28th April 2003, 18:43   #54
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Hi Simondix,
All the pipits can be abbreviated like that . .
Mipit, Tripit, Ropit, Wapit, Tawpit, Olipit, Artypit (R-T), Dickypit (Richard's), Blypit, Peckypit (Pechora), etc

Hi Alan,
Apart from the official Sparrow, I've never heard of anything other than Spuggy/Spuggie in this area (Northumbs)

Hi Surreybirder & Kevin,
Yes, Edward is right - Tystie, Bonxie, Erne are all Old Norse Viking bird names, not Gaelic.

Michael
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 12:52   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreybirder
Any Gaelic speakers on this forum?
I think that bonxie is the Gaelic name for great skua; as is trystie for black guillemot and erne for sea eagle.
I think you are right about the last two, but a book on Shetland folklore told me once that 'bonxie' is actually a surviving word from the (now-dead) native lagauage spoken in Shetland, which I believe was called Norn, or something like that.
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 13:17   #56
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Erne is often used in crosswords - Clue: Sea Eagle.
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 18:58   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcina
I think you are right about the last two, but a book on Shetland folklore told me once that 'bonxie' is actually a surviving word from the (now-dead) native lagauage spoken in Shetland, which I believe was called Norn, or something like that.
All three are Shetland names NOT Gaelic.

Shetland dialect derives from a maixture of Old English, Old Scots and Norn, a form of Norwegian (no Gaelic at all).

Tystie is almost the same as thebirds name in all other Scandinavian countries.

Erne is also Scandic I think.

Bonxie though is of uncertain eymology.
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 19:40   #58
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 19:57   #59
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To dip out (on)

Friends,
Collins English Dictionary (complete and unabridged, 2003) says, and I quote:
dip out VERB (intr,adverb) Austral and NZ informal (often foll by 'on'): to miss out on or fail to participate in something: 'he dipped out on the examination'

I wondered what its relationship to 'dipping' to find out who would be 'it' in a children's playground game (like 'one potato, two potato...' or 'eeny, meeny,miney, mo...' etc) - because that has something to do with being 'in' or 'out'.

Interestingly the next entry after 'dip out' in the Collins is 'dipper', and our tubby friend Cinclus cinclus is only the second meaning!! Meaning 1 is 'a ladle used for dipping' .... which just goes to prove that cookery is more popular than ornithology (as anyone watching UK TV knows!!).

In my home town of Walsall (currently famous for Red Squirrels and Otters - see the thread!) the House Sparrow is a 'spadger'.

'Buzz' for Common Buzzard hasn't been mentioned, I think. The popular 1980s nod to the leaderenne turned Magpies in Maggies.... 'Jacks' for Jackdaws . Tennyson had 'hern' for Heron in 'The Brook'. 'Moorcock' for Moorhen is a fairly widespread local name in some parts of the UK. Then lots of those '-ie' endings to shorten long names: 'Gillie' for Guillemot, 'Kingie' for Kingfisher, 'Blackie' for Blackbird ....but this is a common feature of British English when name fellow humans - 'Smithie' for Smith, 'Hillie' for Hill etc.

Enough for now

Best

David
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 20:01   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Pennington
Bonxie though is of uncertain eymology.
Far be it for me to disagree. However, the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary ventures the following:

[Norw. bunksi, f. bunke dumpy body f. ON bunki heap (cf. Norw. bunke fat woman).]
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 21:21   #61
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I can now ask a question I have been dying to ask,but felt a bit daft,thinking I ought to know the name.In some of the photos ,esp from the USA,the word "Grackles" are given to certain birds,can someone translate please.
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 21:28   #62
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Just out of interest! I was a two-ringer in the Navy before I was a teacher (or birder!) Way back then, 'dip out' and 'dip in' were common parlance, well before birders adopted them! 'Dip in' was usually followed by the advice to 'fill yer boots'!
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Old Wednesday 6th October 2004, 22:21   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluetail
Far be it for me to disagree. However, the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary ventures the following:

[Norw. bunksi, f. bunke dumpy body f. ON bunki heap (cf. Norw. bunke fat woman).]

Yes, I was going to include this. I think this etymology was suggested by Jakobsen who was a brilliant philologist, but not a birder.

If you were naming Great Skua, would you call it dumpy? It's certainly not the first thing that strikes me and several native Shetlanders think along the same lines.

Hence, the etymology is uncertain IMHO.
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Old Tuesday 12th October 2004, 17:25   #64
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Wink The Size Up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Frankis
Hi Simondix,
All the pipits can be abbreviated like that . .
Mipit, Tripit, Ropit, Wapit, Tawpit, Olipit, Artypit (R-T), Dickypit (Richard's), Blypit, Peckypit (Pechora), etc

Hi Alan,
Apart from the official Sparrow, I've never heard of anything other than Spuggy/Spuggie in this area (Northumbs)

Hi Surreybirder & Kevin,
Yes, Edward is right - Tystie, Bonxie, Erne are all Old Norse Viking bird names, not Gaelic.

Michael
We have a local birding woman who has a peculiar affection for her perceived correct pronunciation of bird names.I discovered this while meeting her while keeping a watch on Lake Erie.Without barely a how do you do.she asked if I had seen any Jaegers.I replied that I hadn't seen any Yeagers to which she quickly corrected me to the emphasised J as in Jayger.Not letting it rest she moved on to ask me how I pronounced the name of our large black,white and red woodpecker.Ah,your referring to the pieleated.No she corrected the PillE ated.This progressed into gos hawkvs goshhawk plus a few more.I was sized up at that moment.When I see her these days I move down the patch..I'm no saint if I observe someone looking at a red bellied woodpecker and commenting on it being a redheaded I sometimes speak up unless it's a parent telling that to a kid.If a redbelly needs to be a redhead for a day It's not a critical issue.
Sam
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Old Tuesday 12th October 2004, 21:28   #65
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So,please can anyone tell me what a "Grackle" is?.
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Old Tuesday 12th October 2004, 22:07   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by christineredgate
So,please can anyone tell me what a "Grackle" is?.
Grackles are in the New World family of American Orioles - eg. Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) - you'll find them in an American fieldguide..........

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Old Tuesday 12th October 2004, 22:27   #67
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Grackles are loud and bizzare and beautiful. Underappreciated, I think. They're as close as we come to some really strange and stunning Icterids further south. Watching a group of Boat Tails or Great Tails with all their clicks, grunts, shrieks, and tail displays as you eat your lunch on a bench is something I wish for any first time visitor to the colonies. Irridescent and full of character. They'll keep you up all night if you've picked the wrong spot to camp along the lower Colorado river. They strut....
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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 15:30   #68
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Grackles: etymology

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris D
Grackles are loud and bizzare and beautiful. Underappreciated, I think. They're as close as we come to some really strange and stunning Icterids further south. Watching a group of Boat Tails or Great Tails with all their clicks, grunts, shrieks, and tail displays as you eat your lunch on a bench is something I wish for any first time visitor to the colonies. Irridescent and full of character. They'll keep you up all night if you've picked the wrong spot to camp along the lower Colorado river. They strut....
I think our friend was asking about the etymology of the name "Grackle" rather than what they are.
So here goes:
the name Grackle is an anglicisation of the Latin name for certain members of the starling family, such as Gracula religiosa (the Indian Grackle or Hill Mynah). Gracula itself as a Latin ornithological name comes from the original Latin graculus, which meant Jackdaw.
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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 16:09   #69
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bearded tit? bearded reedling? i'm afraid it will always be bearded tit to me.
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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 19:57   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by black52bird
I think our friend was asking about the etymology of the name "Grackle" rather than what they are.
So here goes:
the name Grackle is an anglicisation of the Latin name for certain members of the starling family, such as Gracula religiosa (the Indian Grackle or Hill Mynah). Gracula itself as a Latin ornithological name comes from the original Latin graculus, which meant Jackdaw.
Very best
David
David,thankyou.So Grackles are akin to our Starlings,noisy.squabbling,and very entertaining
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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 20:15   #71
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I don't like the terms:
"gripped" and "gripping"...
..they just seem odd,and have never been in my vocabulary.
Whenever I hear them...usually at some minor 'twitch',
they strike me as unusual and rather twee words...dunno,strange really!
I don't much care for 'twitch' either!!..

Dave.

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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 20:28   #72
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i really like 'porn star'

as in the Bluetail was really 'porn starring' it - i.e. giving exceptionally good views!

i remember another thread in a similar vein with more stuff on it though....?
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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 20:34   #73
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it's in the birding slang thread

some good stuff there
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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 20:36   #74
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Or,
That's a 'channel 5' area of the country...under watched.
or,
A 'Sky News special correspondent' bird....bl**dy everywhere.

shall have to think of some more..brb!

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Old Wednesday 13th October 2004, 20:40   #75
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I always thought 'Cleaning -up the Interior' always sounded good - like you were not going birding but staying home to do some housework!
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