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Procellariiformes

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Old Monday 9th January 2012, 20:50   #1
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Procellariiformes

Howell 2012. Petrels, Albatrosses & Storm-Petrels of North America: A Photographic Guide. Princeton University Press.

The Amazon preview reveals the taxonomy followed (see Contents). The splits of Oceanodroma [leucorhoa] cheimomnestes Ainley's Storm-Petrel and O [l] socorroensis Townsend's Storm-Petrel are to be expected (following Howell et al 2010). Other splits of interest include O [l] chapmani Chapman's Storm-Petrel, O [castro] bangsi Darwin's Storm-Petrel and Diomedea [exulans] gibsoni Gibson's Albatross.
[John Boyd (TiF) provisionally treats bangsi (and kumagae) as sspp of Oceanodroma (Thalobata) [castro] cryptoleucura 'Pacific Storm-Petrel'.]
The preview includes the sections on phylogeny and taxonomy, and much else. It looks to be an impressive work - I've just placed my order!

Last edited by Richard Klim : Tuesday 10th January 2012 at 17:51. Reason: TiF.
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 02:22   #2
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They also recognize two families of storm petrels, a tactic not yet widely followed by most checklists
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 09:49   #3
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Howell 2012. Petrels, Albatrosses & Storm-Petrels of North America: A Photographic Guide. Princeton University Press.
Richard,
One of the collaborators is named Debra L Shearwater....
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 10:20   #4
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MJB

Debra Shearwater is well known http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/tripsumm.shtml

I think she has posted on BF before now.
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 10:20   #5
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Richard,
One of the collaborators is named Debra L Shearwater....
No birder should visit California without taking at least one pelagic with Debi!
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 11:07   #6
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MJB Debra Shearwater is well known http://www.shearwaterjourneys.com/tripsumm.shtml . I think she has posted on BF before now.
Indeed, but it's yet another case of Nominative Determinism... (which term appears frequently in New Scientist...)
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 11:17   #7
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Indeed, but it's yet another case of Nominative Determinism...
Well, this time it's the other way round - Debi legally changed her name (from Millichap) to Shearwater to fit the role!

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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 13:13   #8
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That gives Mr Screaming Piha an idea...
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 13:34   #9
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That gives Mr Screaming Piha an idea...
Wonderful! I love stories that no-one would believe if you had invented them!
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 13:44   #10
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Amazon preview reveals the taxonomy followed (see Contents). The splits of Oceanodroma [leucorhoa] cheimomnestes Ainley's Storm-Petrel and O [l] socorroensis Townsend's Storm-Petrel are to be expected. Other splits of interest include O [l] chapmani Chapman's Storm-Petrel, O [castro] bangsi Darwin's Storm-Petrel and Diomedea [exulans] gibsoni Gibson's Albatross.
It appears from the index that Steve Howell hasn't formally put these forward, nor accepted them, as splits as he uses square brackets, representing species rank uncertainty (unless, that is, he says something different in another section). For these, he follows other authors, quoting references.

For Darwin's Storm-Petrel he says ‘As a measure of nomenclatural convenience, I propose here the name Darwin’s Storm-Petrel for the Galapagos population’ and 'should convey ready geographic association'. I don't think Band-rumped has been recorded along the Western Seaboard - if it has, then I'm unsure how the Hawaiian birds would be separated from 'Darwin's' - as it is there's much uncertainty in sorting the Atlantic 'Band-rumped's' in the field (and I'm fascinated to read how Steve has covered those also).
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 14:45   #11
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It appears from the index that Steve Howell hasn't formally put these forward, nor accepted them, as splits as he uses square brackets, representing species rank uncertainty...
Well, Steve clearly considers that they merit splitting. eg, from Howell 2010...
Quote:
...two taxa breeding on islets off Mexico's Guadalupe Island (soccoroensis and cheimomnestes), treated herein as full species, with English names Townsend's Storm-Petrel and Ainley's Storm-Petrel, respectively.

In a forthcoming identification guide to North American petrels, albatrosses, and storm-petrels, Howell (in prep.) will treat the Guadalupe Island taxa as full species, using the English names Townsend's Storm-Petrel for the summer-breeding O. [leucorhoa] socorroensis and Ainley's Storm-Petrel for the winter-breeding O. [leucorhoa] cheimomnestes.

Townsend's Storm-Petrel (O. socorroensis) breeds on...

Ainley's Storm-Petrel (O. cheimomnestes) breeds on...
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I don't think Band-rumped has been recorded along the Western Seaboard...
Note that for the purposes of the book, 'North America' continues south to Panama. Howell & Webb 1995 states that O castro is an offshore Pacific visitor to Mexico, perhaps irregularly/seasonally fairly common (Apr-Aug?) to waters around Islas Revillagigedo, although with only one documented (photographed) record.

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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 15:30   #12
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I think the use of brackets is more so that birders who might not be aware of these splits or follow checklists that have not yet endorsed these splits, can easily know what group of petrels Howell is referring to.
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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 16:42   #13
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Well, Steve clearly considers that they merit splitting. eg, from Howell 2010....
Hi Richard
Here, in Steve Howell's new book, it uses Ainley’s (Leach’s) Storm-Petrel and Townsend’s (Leach’s) Storm-Petrel in the main index, text, photo plates and the main taxonomy section, with Oceanodroma [leucorhoa] cheimomnestes, as an example, for the first….so I would read these to mean of ‘uncertain species status’ (if I hadn’t read the earlier article!) I cannot, at present, access the Ainley’s detailed pages, though I do have a review copy on its way to me so if this is clarified I’ll let you know.

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Note that for the purposes of the book, 'North America' continues south to Panama. Howell & Webb 1995 states that O castro is an offshore Pacific visitor to Mexico, perhaps irregularly/seasonally fairly common (Apr-Aug?) to waters around Islas Revillagigedo, although with only one documented (photographed) record.
Since amended by Howell,1996 (A Checklist of the Birds of Mexico). Also, in the new book it says probably a rare offshore visitor to Panama, and continues ‘….but no well-documented records from Mexico’ and ‘reports off Baja…are unsubstantiated’. In fact, the only record for the region, covered by the book, is a specimen dated 1898 taken off Costa Rica.

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I think the use of brackets is more so that birders who might not be aware of these splits or follow checklists that have not yet endorsed these splits, can easily know what group of petrels Howell is referring to.
Doesn't the use, like this, go against the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, Article 6 ("Interpolated names'')?

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Old Tuesday 10th January 2012, 21:26   #14
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Probably 'splitting' hairs (and I'm certainly no expert!), but square brackets generally indicate aggregates of closely-related species (eg, allospecies), with the superspecies name bracketed; whereas uncertain species status is more often indicated by enclosing the parent species name in curved brackets.

Re O [castro] bangsi off the North Pacific coast, perhaps occurrence is just hypothetical?

Looking forward to seeing the book...

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Old Wednesday 11th January 2012, 01:27   #15
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What do the brackets mean then in his "Grant's [Band-rumped] Storm Petrel Oceanodroma castro undescribed"??
http://books.google.com/books?id=okw...=Grant&f=false .
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Old Wednesday 11th January 2012, 08:17   #16
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What do the brackets mean then in his "Grant's [Band-rumped] Storm Petrel Oceanodroma castro undescribed"??
http://books.google.com/books?id=okw...=Grant&f=false .
I was referring to the use of brackets within scientific names, where square brackets are often used to clarify the origin/derivation of splits not yet widely adopted within the ornithological community (as Morgan noted earlier). Steve Howell has used the same approach within the vernacular names.

My understanding is that Robb & Mullarney (2008), and Steve Howell, recognise Grant's Storm Petrel as a valid species, albeit undescribed. Hence the description on the Contents page as "Oceanodroma [castro] undescribed", consistent with the other elevated forms. Also, on p369, "In the ne Atlantic, at least four species-level taxa in the Band-rumped Storm-Petrel complex breed on various islands: the widespread winter-breeding Grant's Storm-Petrel (which has yet to be described formally),..."
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Old Thursday 12th January 2012, 18:38   #17
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IOC Proposed Splits 3.0:
Grey-faced Petrel Pterodroma gouldi
Scopoli's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea
http://www.worldbirdnames.org/updates-PS.html
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Old Monday 30th January 2012, 07:07   #18
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Howell 2012

Reviewed by Rick Wright on The ABA Blog: Howell: Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America.

Confirming one of Rick's observations, the preview includes examples of 'Trinidade' Petrel, and 'Trinidad' Petrel, but sadly no Trindade Petrels. Also, an interesting point about hasitata (which Jobling 2010 attributes to haesitatus).

[Still awaiting my copy. Latest estimate from Amazon UK: 3-10 Feb 2012.]

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Old Monday 30th January 2012, 09:31   #19
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Classic. It seems that Rick Wright can't spell Trindade either, as he says "The name of the island Trinidade is inconsistently spelled...".

Sadly, most non-Brazilians, or at least English-speaking non-Brazilians, just can't seem to get their heads around the fact that this island has absolutely bugger all to do with an island just off Venezuela. That i just keeps slipping in there.

One bird magazine "editor" even had the audacity to tell me once that "Trinidade" was a legitimate alternative spelling.

Do any of these people actually ever refer to source like the "Times Atlas"?
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Old Monday 30th January 2012, 10:26   #20
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Do any of these people actually ever refer to source like the "Times Atlas"?
Careful, Guy. Remember ’Abd al Kuri (Times Atlas) / Abd ’Al-Kuri (www.boc-online.org/bulletins/bulletin128.htm)?
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Old Monday 30th January 2012, 11:20   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Reviewed by Rick Wright on The ABA Blog: Howell: Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America.

Confirming one of Rick's observations, the preview includes examples of 'Trinidade' Petrel, and 'Trinidad' Petrel, but sadly no Trindade Petrels. Also, an interesting point about hasitata (which Jobling 2010 attributes to haesitatus).

[Still awaiting my copy. Latest estimate from Amazon UK: 3-10 Feb 2012.]
from the review:
Quote:
But even if you're not going down to the sea in boats, Petrels, in its sophistication of approach and exemplary detail, may well be the most useful book you read this year.
Quite high praise

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Old Monday 30th January 2012, 11:32   #22
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Careful, Guy. Remember ’Abd al Kuri (Times Atlas) / Abd ’Al-Kuri (www.boc-online.org/bulletins/bulletin128.htm)?


Fair cop guv, there's no denying my lapsus. But, as you well know Richard (BF's devil's advocate), the cases are not wholly analagous.
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Old Monday 30th January 2012, 23:14   #23
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Rick Wright said"The specific epithet of the Black-capped Petrel, hasitata, is probably a misspelling not of haesitata but of hastata, meaning blade-shaped, in reference to the wings"

I am certain that Pt. hasitata is not the correct name for Black-capped Petrel. It stems from one showing up in Norfolk, England and Alfred Newman trying to figure it out.
I wrote about this before. Part of the trouble is that Gould told him : The petrel you write about is the same as that to which I gave the name of' rubritarsi,' but as that name was never published, of course no notice can be taken of it.
Newton Yarrell, Gould and George Gray were all smart fellows and all the problems with the name are all presented in the Zoologist article. Temminck bought the bird Kuhl described (from Bullock) and produced a drawing (different from G. & J.R. Forster’s drawing #97 & 98?) http://www.archive.org/stream/Nouvea.../search/hasite
Mr. George Robert Gray, to whom I sent the drawings from which the engravings illustrating this paper were taken, with a request that he would inform me whether they represented the bird as differing from the specimen which belonged to the Zoological Society, or from the figure in the 'Planches Coloriees,' tells me that " the crest is not exhibited in Temminck's figure, nor in the specimen. There is less black on the top of the head in the figure than is given in your drawing, which causes one to suppose that the figure was taken from a more adult example. The specimen from the Society also differs from the drawing sent—the black on the forehead advances to the base of the nostrils, and the black on the hind head extends further down the nape. These variations may prove that the Museum's specimen is rather younger than the example taken in Norfolk. In all other respects they agree." Mr. Yarrell considers Mr. Newcome's bird as decidedly adult. But Newton went ahead and named the Black-capped Petrel hasitata.
http://books.google.com/books?id=cMw...sitata&f=false .

Anyway Rick Wright is I think wrong about hasitata . Kuhl (1820)gives credit to Forster for the name Procellaria hasitata but J. R. Forster in MS (not published until 1844 by Lichtenstein)used haesitata. And in Kuhl’s description of the bird he says Cauda cuneiformi, that is tail wedge-shaped. Temminck gave the French name of Petrel hasite. So nowhere is Kuhl’s bird described as having dagger shaped anything.
http://biodiversitylibrary.org/item/...e/155/mode/1up Kuhl, p. 142

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Old Tuesday 31st January 2012, 20:00   #24
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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Reviewed by Rick Wright on The ABA Blog: Howell: Petrels, Albatrosses, and Storm-Petrels of North America.

Confirming one of Rick's observations, the preview includes examples of 'Trinidade' Petrel, and 'Trinidad' Petrel, but sadly no Trindade Petrels. Also, an interesting point about hasitata (which Jobling 2010 attributes to haesitatus).
[1] From my perspective as a long-time reference book editor, I have to weigh in with the observation that the book's editor (and further up, the publisher) should bear part of the onus here. University presses in particular long ago abdicated all responsibility to help authors produce the best possible content. Presses don't usually employ good copy editors to vet every page of ms. submitted, and authors aren't told that proofreading from a computer screen is highly error-prone. However, I do admit a simple text search would have coughed up the irregularities.

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[Still awaiting my copy. Latest estimate from Amazon UK: 3-10 Feb 2012.]
[2] I took a chance and downloaded the Kindle version. It turns out you don't need a color Kindle: you can view it from "the cloud" on your computer, download it to your computer and view it from the free Kindle program, and have duplicate copies on your other devices. I found the color photo rendition quite good on my laptop screen and smartphone both (but will compare it to the print version when the local library gets a copy). One can add notations, bookmarks, etc. I'm no longer a skeptic (Br. Eng. sceptic).

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Old Thursday 2nd February 2012, 09:07   #25
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In a response to the review North American Birds editor Ned Brinkley states: “BTW, I think the typos for Trinidade Petrel in the captions that Rick mentions were introduced by a graphic designer rather than by the author!” I think I understand now why the Amercanskis keep adding that ‘I’. The Principality of Trinidad was declared in 1893, when the American James Harden-Hickey claimed the uninhabited island Trindade . In July 1895, the British tried to take possession of this strategic position in the Atlantic, basing their claim on the 1700 visit by English astronomer Edmund Halley. The British called it Trinidade also. The SACC says that Numida meleagris Helmeted Guineafowl: Introduced on Trindade island, Brazil, but subsequently eradicated (Alves et al. 2011). Alves says that supposedly Edmund Halley brought Guineafowl to the Island in the year 1700. Wikipedia says Nowadays, Brazilian presence is marked by a permanent Brazilian Navy base on the main island. Alves says that the Brazilian navy eradicated the Guineafowl.

Mr. Brinkley also states: “The fates of all the proposed nomenclatural and taxonomic changes will be interesting to follow. If history is any guide (e.g., the Howell/Webb guide to Mexico and northern Central America, almost all of whose "renegade" splits and re-namings are now accepted), then we may see a few of these on "official" checklists in the not-too-distant future” Discuss.
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