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SE star test

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Old Sunday 25th August 2013, 03:25   #1
Pileatus
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Arrow SE star test

We spent a few hours examining the milky way with our 8X32 SE's. Truly, the absolute perfect star test.

Last edited by Pileatus : Sunday 25th August 2013 at 12:20.
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Old Sunday 25th August 2013, 04:29   #2
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We spent a few hours examining the milky way with our 8X32 SE's. Truly, the absolute perfect star test.

PS
I swear we watched as a stationery satellite was repositioned.
You can tell a lot about a binoculars resolution capabilities under the night sky and also just how really good they are in the outer fov. I spent some time with Zeta Lyrae the other night and was able to make the split even in the extreme outer edge in my Nikon Prostars.

I know the Prostars have a rather narrow apparent fov but I was also able to observe Vega without any indication of spiking or color shift which says volumes about the quality of the optics. I've seen a lot of binoculars that perform well in terrestrial daylight applications come up lacking under the night sky. I use all of the SEs for astronomy but I'm particularly fond of the 12x50 which is the binocular I used the most when learning the night sky.

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Old Sunday 25th August 2013, 13:31   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
You can tell a lot about a binoculars resolution capabilities under the night sky and also just how really good they are in the outer fov. I spent some time with Zeta Lyrae the other night and was able to make the split even in the extreme outer edge in my Nikon Prostars.

I know the Prostars have a rather narrow apparent fov but I was also able to observe Vega without any indication of spiking or color shift which says volumes about the quality of the optics. I've seen a lot of binoculars that perform well in terrestrial daylight applications come up lacking under the night sky. I use all of the SEs for astronomy but I'm particularly fond of the 12x50 which is the binocular I used the most when learning the night sky.

Steve
I bought the 8x first. i next bought the 12x specifically for the night sky, which it is, i think, its best use. then about 2 years ago, i got the 10x, for "dual" use.
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Old Sunday 25th August 2013, 13:32   #4
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. Stationary satellites are probably too faint to be seen with binoculars normally.
From memory they are about magnitude 13.
However, I have seen them flareup to about magnitude 6 to 8 with 12 x 45 and 18 x 50 binoculars while observing M 42.
These were shown to be geosynchronous satellites but sometimes sometimes somewhat nearer satellites that appear to be stationary over short periods.

There are many point source satellites but these are due to specular reflections and don't last long.

There are quite a lot of trios of satellites and some of these cause confusion as first one and then a second are seen.

People who have CCTV lowlight cameras on 24 hours a day are picking up all sorts of strange things.

There are also point source meteors.

The colour of these point sources also give an indication of whether they are civilian satellites are not.

The sky is full of strange points of light especially nowadays with thousands of artificial satellites.
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