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Nikon 8X32 SE 504 series

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Old Friday 13th March 2020, 02:57   #1
Pileatus
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Nikon 8X32 SE 504 series

When the weather warms a bit I love to get up early (0300 or so) to view the stars. Retirement allows me to do this since my schedule is, truly, my schedule. In any case...

Sometimes I setup my tripod and binocular mount with a 10X50 or an 8.5X42 but lately I've been lazy so I just bundle up, grab my aging 8X32 SE and sit outside under the stars. Thankfully, I have the SkyView app to guide me around the sky. In any case, the 8X32 SE is light enough, stable enough and sharp enough across its FOV to offer a rather pleasant view of the night sky. When I consider much of the light stimulating my retina was generated hundreds or thousands of years ago I'm truly humbled.

Last edited by Pileatus : Friday 13th March 2020 at 03:42.
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Old Friday 13th March 2020, 15:50   #2
yarrellii
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Such a lovely thought/feeling :)
When in trouble or while going through difficult times, it is always humbling to stare at the stars. I'm a casual backyard stargazer (I enjoy pretty decent skies for Europe). I remember when I read about Andromeda galaxy, the most distant thing visible to the naked eye, 2,5 million light years away... which in turns makes it the oldest thing visible to the naked eye; the light we see was casted 2,5 million years ago. To think that the light we see tonight left Andromeda before Homo sapiens even existed. Hominids living when that light left Andromeda where using primitive stone tools. Still another million years had to go by (while that light kept on traveling) before we could harness fire. That tiny faint light through your Nikons (I have them too!) has been traveling non-stop while we made our history, every known person, every known invention, music, poem, painting, everybody that has ever been... trapped on the travel from Andromeda to our eyes. It is just humbling. I think wonders like this should help us find comfort in these times we are living :)
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Old Friday 13th March 2020, 16:25   #3
Pileatus
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Originally Posted by yarrellii View Post
Such a lovely thought/feeling :)
When in trouble or while going through difficult times, it is always humbling to stare at the stars. I'm a casual backyard stargazer (I enjoy pretty decent skies for Europe). I remember when I read about Andromeda galaxy, the most distant thing visible to the naked eye, 2,5 million light years away... which in turns makes it the oldest thing visible to the naked eye; the light we see was casted 2,5 million years ago. To think that the light we see tonight left Andromeda before Homo sapiens even existed. Hominids living when that light left Andromeda where using primitive stone tools. Still another million years had to go by (while that light kept on traveling) before we could harness fire. That tiny faint light through your Nikons (I have them too!) has been traveling non-stop while we made our history, every known person, every known invention, music, poem, painting, everybody that has ever been... trapped on the travel from Andromeda to our eyes. It is just humbling. I think wonders like this should help us find comfort in these times we are living :)
Great observation!!
https://strictlyastronomy.com/post/1...-the-naked-eye
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Old Saturday 14th March 2020, 03:00   #4
wdc
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That was a lovely rabbit hole to go down on a Friday night. My wife and I watched a compilation video of Milky Way time lapse videos, after reading that article. Just what was needed to get a little perspective on things...

-Bill
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Old Saturday 14th March 2020, 05:45   #5
Boogieshrew
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What a lovely thread. Thank you Pileatus and yarrelli, you have both given me some badly needed perspective. I have a lot of weight on my shoulders right now and need that perspective.
I go birding for that perspective and to unburden myself, perhaps I should stargaze too.
Very very nice.
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Old Saturday 14th March 2020, 11:05   #6
mooreorless
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I have a Nikon 8x32 SE and will agree 100% with Pileatus! I have some larger binoculars and scope for this as well. A binocular is great for quick looks at the night sky and longer if you want. I have laid on the ground as well, with a floating mattress to lay on.
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Old Saturday 14th March 2020, 18:44   #7
Binastro
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M33 is rather easily visible to good unaided eyes from a dark place.
It is about 2.75 million light years distant.
I have seen it many times, even from towns.
But the sky must be transparent.
Usually it needs averted vision, but I saw it with direct vision from La Palma at 7,800ft.
It is magnitude 5.7 visual.

Although I never thought of trying, M81 is visible in a very dark location to those with very good faint vision.
It is visual magnitude 6.9.
Some of my colleagues have seen it without optical aid, but it is very difficult and takes time.
It is almost 12 million light years (11.74 million) away.
It can be nearly overhead from the northern hemisphere, Europe, Britain, U.S.A.

Regards,
B.
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Old Saturday 14th March 2020, 23:58   #8
Pinewood
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Hello,

I have binoculars that are well suited to binocular astronomy: 12x50 and 15x60. During last year's lunar eclipse I used a 7x50 because I can hold it steady, even well above the horizon. A 7x42, well before sunset, revealed a crescent Venus. Searching for Mercury in twilight, is enhanced by just about any handheld binocular.

Just passed full moon, a month or two ago, I saw a waning gibbous moon between blocks of flats, near the horizon. I picked up the nearest binocular, an 8x32, which provided me with views of mare, craters and long shadows near the terminator.

Low power glasses can reveal a lot. I even saw moons of Jupiter with a 6x30, but it was a frigid, clear night.

Clear skies, as the astronomy crowd write,
Arthur Pinewood
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