Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

New Canon 8x20 and 10x20 IS Binoculars

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 09:23   #1
dipped
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: suffolk
Posts: 1,194
New Canon 8x20 and 10x20 IS Binoculars

Just went on Wex photographic and found Canon's new compacts.

Last edited by dipped : Friday 20th September 2019 at 09:57. Reason: spelling
dipped is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 14:36   #2
[email protected]
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 2,110
Those look nice and I think an IS compact makes a lot of sense because even with the smaller exit pupil they are not as difficult for eye placement as a regular compact or as finicky. Now you have the choice of any magnification in an IS compact with Canon selling an 8x and 10x and Fujinon selling a 12x and 16x. They are all around 15 oz. except the Fujinon 16x28 is 18 oz. You could use any of them for a daylight birding binocular. The Canon 8x20 IS would be very good for birding.
denco@comcast.n is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 15:31   #3
ceasar
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: NE Pennsylvania
Posts: 11,842
Are these replacing the Canon 8x25 IS binocular? They don't look much smaller.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MrFoqzXzj4




See 8x25 here:

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...zed.html/specs
ceasar is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2010 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 20th September 2019, 16:28   #4
Binastro
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: S.England
Posts: 4,571
I was immediately interested in the 10x20, but at twice the price of the Canon 8x25 IS, I think not.

Weird specs.
If the 10x20 has a +/- 9.2 dioptre correction that would allow many users to use a Canon IS binocular.
Yet the 8x20 says +/- 5.9 dioptre.

Eye relief 13.5mm?

Close focus 2.0mm. That is really good!

I don't know what the warranty is.

But at the price I'll give them a miss.

Regards,
B.
Binastro is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 17:02   #5
Stanbo
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Cheshire
Posts: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by ceasar View Post
Are these replacing the Canon 8x25 IS binocular? They don't look much smaller.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MrFoqzXzj4

See 8x25 here:

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...zed.html/specs

I assume they will as they are exactly the same size as the current 8x25, which I have at hand, but with the edges rounded off. Internally the 8x20 has a different lens setup probably to allow a minimum focus reduction from 3.5m to 2m but possibly to compensate for any changes needed for the IS as well. Eye relief at 13.5mm, FOV 6.6 degrees and 115m @1000m remain the same as is the CR123 battery, but the battery life has increased from 5 hrs to 12 hrs. The IS button will also now stay on for 5 mins as opposed to having to hold it down on the 8x25.

The weight is reduced from 490g to 420g so it looks as if they are still made of a plastic material. The 8x25 does feel plasticky and the focuser becomes tight in cold weather and it would be nice if this has been rectified in the 8x20

I have an 8x25 for over 5 years that has been bounced about in the car as well as being used as a pocket bino with no ill effects. I find it good enough to take on holiday as my only bino if I need to keep weight down so in my opinion it is a good starting point for a next generation. The gestation of the 8x20 seems to have followed the same path as the 32 series by being based on earlier models.

Stan
Stanbo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 18:02   #6
henry link
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: north carolina
Posts: 4,398
I noticed this cutaway view of the 8x20. It shows a much simpler objective design compared to the 32mm models and the glass cover plate has been dropped. It's not completely clear, but possibly the whole objective/IS lens assembly moves back and forth for focusing. A quick look at the actual binocular would reveal what moves and what doesn't. At the eyepiece end the field flattener is now a singlet instead of a doublet, presumably because that's all that's needed for the modest 50 apparent field width.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	oJ62xf7o7WC9zPz49Y9Rt7-650-80.jpg
Views:	33
Size:	28.5 KB
ID:	705351  

Last edited by henry link : Friday 20th September 2019 at 18:06.
henry link is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 18:48   #7
dipped
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: suffolk
Posts: 1,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by henry link View Post
I noticed this cutaway view of the 8x20. It shows a much simpler objective design compared to the 32mm models and the glass cover plate has been dropped. It's not completely clear, but possibly the whole objective/IS lens assembly moves back and forth for focusing. A quick look at the actual binocular would reveal what moves and what doesn't. At the eyepiece end the field flattener is now a singlet instead of a doublet, presumably because that's all that's needed for the modest 50 apparent field width.

I presume the specs are wrong on the Canon site as both 8 and 10x say "Doublet Field Flattener : Yes"
dipped is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 19:45   #8
henry link
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: north carolina
Posts: 4,398
I think that's probably wrong. The eyepiece lens construction spec of "4 elements in 3 groups" matches the cutaway only if the field lens is a singlet rather than a doublet.

I also notice in those specs that the prism is a Porro I, which is a departure from the Porro II used in earlier models (except for a roof prism in the old 15x45).

Last edited by henry link : Friday 20th September 2019 at 23:45.
henry link is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 20:57   #9
Binastro
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: S.England
Posts: 4,571
15x45 (:

B.
Binastro is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 20th September 2019, 23:45   #10
henry link
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: north carolina
Posts: 4,398
Right, Binastro. Thanks, I changed my post.
henry link is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 00:57   #11
[email protected]
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 2,110
I wonder if they use the same rubber armour? They were a lot of complaints about the armour "melting" on the 10x30 IS. They are a little pricey for a 20mm. The FOV's are pretty narrow with the 8x being 6.6 degree's and the 10x being 5.3 degree's. You are paying a premium in price and performance to get the compact size when the standard 10x30 IS II has a 6.0 degree FOV and still is pretty light at 20 oz. and sells for $500.00. I do like how the objective lenses seem to be recessed quite a bit which would be good for stray light and protection for the lenses.

Last edited by [email protected] : Saturday 21st September 2019 at 02:12.
denco@comcast.n is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 08:51   #12
Super Dave
Registered User
 
Super Dave's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kaneohe, HI
Posts: 169
Wow, I had no idea Canon made these little IS binoculars. That's exciting.

Are they made in Japan?

How is the image quality?

Seems like someone in the IS department really likes those folding eyecups. Why?

The rubber armor looks like what they use on my newer 14x32.

I could see maybe IS in 10X but at 8X I think I'd rather tote a lighter / smaller 8x25.

At any rate, thanks for starting this post. Very interesting.
Super Dave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 09:39   #13
Stanbo
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Cheshire
Posts: 212
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
I wonder if they use the same rubber armour? They were a lot of complaints about the armour "melting" on the 10x30 IS. They are a little pricey for a 20mm. The FOV's are pretty narrow with the 8x being 6.6 degree's and the 10x being 5.3 degree's. You are paying a premium in price and performance to get the compact size when the standard 10x30 IS II has a 6.0 degree FOV and still is pretty light at 20 oz. and sells for $500.00. I do like how the objective lenses seem to be recessed quite a bit which would be good for stray light and protection for the lenses.
The 10x30 has always appeared to be a loss leader in the overall Canon range. If you compare the price to the 12x36 which is the virtually identical to the 10x30 except for the objective lens - 739 to 509 at Canon online prices - you can see what I mean.

With the introduction of the 10x20 the range is increased to three 10x models - 10x20, 10x30 and 10x32 - so it will be interesting to see whether they all remain.
Stanbo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 12:26   #14
kabsetz
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Finland
Posts: 1,502
In the video one can see that the IS activation button is click-on-stays-on, which is great as one does not need to hold the finger on the button.

These don't look small, but are probably pretty easy to hold. Looking forward to trying them, at least the 8x20. 10x20 very likely does not have enough exit pupil size for me.

Canon typically introduces models at much higher list prices than what they settle down to after 6-12 months.

Any new models are good in the sense that they show the company is still developing their line-up. Maybe a premium model to truly replace the mighty 10x42 L IS is not just a mirage.

- Kimmo
kabsetz is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 14:40   #15
dipped
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: suffolk
Posts: 1,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by kabsetz View Post
In the video one can see that the IS activation button is click-on-stays-on, which is great as one does not need to hold the finger on the button.
- Kimmo
I rather hope it does click on stay on but the annotated video says it stays on for up to 5 minutes which suggests it switches off after that time regardless of whether you are actively using the binoculars.

This is the same with the Viking Scout IS model which has a slider/rocker switch which needs to be put to the off position and back on again if you are viewing for longer than 5 minutes. Rather irksome if you are viewing a bird and you lose IS and have to fumble about with the switch.

I think all the current crop of IS binoculars from Kenko, Viking, etc have this quirk though one of them lasts 10 minutes (or was that the Fujinon?).
dipped is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 15:13   #16
18000bph
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 90
The 32mm Canon models turn off the IS after five minutes or after the binocular has been vertical for a few seconds (stood up on a table or resting around your neck). It's a button, not a rocker, so it's not too invasive to just push the button again. I'd rather have that than have the button accidentally activate in a bag, stay on for hours, kill the batteries, then leak out and ruin your $800 binos.

These new IS compacts are interesting, but those eyecups are going to ruin them. The rubber boots are bad enough on the 32mm models, but paired with low FOV, even smaller exit pupils, and lower eye relief is going to make them almost unusable for someone like me.

Last edited by 18000bph : Saturday 21st September 2019 at 15:16.
18000bph is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 15:39   #17
dipped
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: suffolk
Posts: 1,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18000bph View Post
The 32mm Canon models turn off the IS after five minutes or after the binocular has been vertical for a few seconds
What happens if you push the button before the 5 minutes is up, does it reset and give you 5 minutes from then?
dipped is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 15:49   #18
18000bph
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by dipped View Post
What happens if you push the button before the 5 minutes is up, does it reset and give you 5 minutes from then?
It's got two buttons--one for each mode--IS and Powered IS. If you have an IS mode on and you push the same button again it will turn off all IS. If you push the other IS mode it will switch to that mode and the five minute timer starts over.
18000bph is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 16:03   #19
dipped
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: suffolk
Posts: 1,194
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18000bph View Post
It's got two buttons--one for each mode--IS and Powered IS. If you have an IS mode on and you push the same button again it will turn off all IS. If you push the other IS mode it will switch to that mode and the five minute timer starts over.
I see thanks. So if you want to view beyond 5 minutes/continuously you can keep switching between modes.
dipped is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 17:59   #20
[email protected]
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 2,110
"Maybe a premium model to truly replace the mighty 10x42 L IS is not just a mirage."

Yes, make it more compact and ergonomically shaped instead of a square brick and get the weight down to about 30 oz. Give it some nice comfortable softer adjustable eye cups that are smaller and actually fit your eye sockets. Give it the two mode IS with buttons that you can find. Recess the objective lenses more for glare and fit some tethered objective covers on them. Increase the FOV 5 degrees and use a CR2 battery instead of two double AA's for weight and space savings. Give the case a bigger, heavier adjustable strap instead of the little thin string it comes with and it would be the best binocular you could buy anywhere!

Last edited by [email protected] : Saturday 21st September 2019 at 18:02.
denco@comcast.n is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 21:43   #21
Super Dave
Registered User
 
Super Dave's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kaneohe, HI
Posts: 169
How is the image quality of the 8x25? I totally missed this one.
Super Dave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 22:22   #22
Binastro
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: S.England
Posts: 4,571
Hi Dave,

I have had three Canon 8x25 IS.
One is a lemon, which I should have returned but didn't.
The other two were good and went to family members.

The front optical windows fell out on both these but were replaced by Canon. One had a complete service.
The glue for the optical window has very little to grasp on the thin front cell.

Optically they are good but not outstanding.
However, when the IS button is pressed they outresolve any non IS competitor.
The batteries may be hard to find abroad and expensive, so keep spares.

There was a complete change in the IS from variprisms to moving lens. But both IS worked well.

I think that the 8x25IS is the lower tier of the Canon quality wise but it still can provide outstanding views.

They have been retired from cricket duties to be replaced by the Nikon EX 10x25, which is reported to have been very good at Leeds last week on its first outing.
No reason for the change. Just decided to have a change.

So the Canon 8x25 IS is good, but check that you get a good one and don't lose an optical window if it falls out.

Regards,
B.
Binastro is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 22:58   #23
etudiant
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019

 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 4,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
"Maybe a premium model to truly replace the mighty 10x42 L IS is not just a mirage."

Yes, make it more compact and ergonomically shaped instead of a square brick and get the weight down to about 30 oz. Give it some nice comfortable softer adjustable eye cups that are smaller and actually fit your eye sockets. Give it the two mode IS with buttons that you can find. Recess the objective lenses more for glare and fit some tethered objective covers on them. Increase the FOV 5 degrees and use a CR2 battery instead of two double AA's for weight and space savings. Give the case a bigger, heavier adjustable strap instead of the little thin string it comes with and it would be the best binocular you could buy anywhere!
You're asking a lot.
Henry posted a cutaway of the glass some time ago and what impressed me was how tightly packed everything was. The oculars are big because the lenses are big.
Could smaller lenses work? Maybe Henry or Binastro or Surveyor could explain the tradeoff, I cannot, but suspect the Canon guys did the best they could.
I honestly don't see how they could also widen the FoV, at 6.5* it is pretty decent, not even the Zeiss SF does better.

Agree the objective covers provided are worthless. I used the threaded fittings to attach 52mm lens hoods, they protect and shield, for under $10 each.
https://www.amazon.com/Fotasy-Nikkor...gateway&sr=8-5

Agree with you 100% on the idea of smaller batteries, better button placement and a more sensible case. Also would love a lower weight, but don't care about the appearance. Form follows function for Canon and that is as it should be.
etudiant is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Saturday 21st September 2019, 23:31   #24
18000bph
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by dipped View Post
I see thanks. So if you want to view beyond 5 minutes/continuously you can keep switching between modes.
That trick would work for the 32mm since it has the two different IS modes and buttons, but these new 20mm models look to only have one button. I don't see it as a big deal since it's not like the image goes dark, it just starts to shake a little. Besides, the shakes probably wouldn't be too dramatic on a small 8x or 10x.
18000bph is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 22nd September 2019, 00:29   #25
Super Dave
Registered User
 
Super Dave's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Kaneohe, HI
Posts: 169
Thank you for the excellent review Binastro. Were they made in Japan or China. Thanks

Last edited by Super Dave : Sunday 22nd September 2019 at 07:05.
Super Dave is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.16473198 seconds with 40 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 18:25.