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Is a hummer a hummer?

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Old Wednesday 7th September 2005, 23:49   #1
JimAuburn
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Is a hummer a hummer?

This hummingbird identification is new to me. Is a hummingbird a hummingbird?

I was enjoying the seemingly many different types of hummingbirds pictured here:

http://www.photocamel.com/index.php/...393.0/all.html

And I wondered: what *are* all of those different types of hummingbirds?

Can anyone give me IDs, other than "hummingbird"?

Thanks!
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 00:04   #2
KC Foggin
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Hi Jim.

What were on that website that you posted were male and female Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. The Ruby-throated are the only types of Hummingbirds I get in my part of the country. Well there have been some Rufous Hummingbirds spotted here but I haven't seen one yet. It would have been nice if the poster had given that information. If you do a search in our gallery with the search word "hummingbird" you can see the hummingbirds from all over the world and their appropriate names.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 01:20   #3
samuel walker
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Hi Jim typical birder shorthand hummer=hummingbird sharpie=sharp shimmed hawk hoodie=hooded merganser there are dozens more.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 01:49   #4
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I you come from the Eastern US then you've probably only ever seen the Ruby-throated Hummingbird, the only one (usually) on that side of the country. There are myriad other hummingbird species, and on top of that most are sexually dimorphic, males and females look different.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 07:04   #5
jacana
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are you sure they are ruby throats? i'd have said that they were anna's hummers as the red is also on the top of the head.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 07:46   #6
Nathan Terzaghi
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All the birds are Anna's. They are more massive than Ruby-throateds, with thicker, straighter, and generally shorter bills. The males have red on the top of the head; the red is pinkish, not ruby; and a long white line droops down from the eye. The females have dark throats, which Archilochus hummers do not have.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 09:56   #7
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Definitely Anna's, for the reasons stated above.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 12:19   #8
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I was not attemting to identify them, so pardon me. I was making the point that for a large portion of the US there is only one hummer, so it may be a surprise for a new or casual birder from the east to find that there are in fact many species. To many everyday folks a sparrow is a sparrow, a finch is a finch, a hawk is a hawk, and so on.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 12:20   #9
Robert Ellis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jacana
are you sure they are ruby throats? i'd have said that they were anna's hummers as the red is also on the top of the head.
I didn't say they were, but thanks for the ID.
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 12:46   #10
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oh right okay!
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 16:29   #11
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So you're telling me all of these hummingbirds are from one species? But they look so different?
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 16:30   #12
JimAuburn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Ellis
I was not attemting to identify them, so pardon me. I was making the point that for a large portion of the US there is only one hummer, so it may be a surprise for a new or casual birder from the east to find that there are in fact many species. To many everyday folks a sparrow is a sparrow, a finch is a finch, a hawk is a hawk, and so on.
That's right, and to be honest I've never heard anyone say anything but "hummingbird."
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Old Thursday 8th September 2005, 17:21   #13
affe22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimAuburn
So you're telling me all of these hummingbirds are from one species? But they look so different?
Male and female hummingbirds (actually a lot of birds) generally have this difference in appearance. Usually the males are the ones that are more brightly colored with throat patches and what not while the females are more drab without the ornamentation that the males have.

Also, there are different times of year when some birds have a more colorful plummage than other times. Ducks are a good example of this. Males and females generally look the same in summer in north america. The males molt into their more colorful plummage for winter/spring.

Juveniles tend to look different until they molt into their adult plummage too.
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