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2019 eBird/Clements taxonomy update - convergence with IOC/HBW mentioned

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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 08:20   #26
gusasp
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Except for Hawaii, it’s definitely August 8, not 7. I appreciate and respect the massive work behind the update, but why promote a public release date if you can’t keep it?
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 10:47   #27
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Except for Hawaii, it’s definitely August 8, not 7. I appreciate and respect the massive work behind the update, but why promote a public release date if you can’t keep it?
In years past it has taken several days. I saw name changes and a few slash species appearing starting before the 7th, and anticipate work will continue for several more days yet. There is usually an “all done” type announcement at the end.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 11:10   #28
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I agree with PB, the behind the scenes work has been announced to take several days.

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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 13:28   #29
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The work-behind-the-scenes-taking-time is Ebird working on people's checklists. If the Cornell checklist is fixed and finalized, it should be published. On Cornell's website.
I remember in some years, Ebird published the list before the official publication date, with the proper warning that it might not be final.

Although it does not concerns me, I find it a bit weird that Ebird is changing people's checklists without telling them what they're doing, just letting them find out by themselves.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 15:46   #30
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Sorry, guys. I agree with Sandee.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 16:07   #31
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I think they are saying what they are doing: https://ebird.org/news/2019-ebird-taxonomy-update

Yes, the spreadsheet has not been uploaded, but the news item above is stating what is going on.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 16:27   #32
sandee
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I think they are saying what they are doing: https://ebird.org/news/2019-ebird-taxonomy-update

Yes, the spreadsheet has not been uploaded, but the news item above is stating what is going on.
Niels
No they're not saying what they are doing. Just that they are changing things around. And they do it according to a list that is Cornell's, and that nobody gets to see.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 17:11   #33
Steve Lister
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Just entered a checklist and discovered that hirundines now come in the middle of warblers !!! Acrocephalus, Locustella, then hirundines, then back to warblers. Weird or what ?

Steve
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 17:41   #34
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Just entered a checklist and discovered that hirundines now come in the middle of warblers !!! Acrocephalus, Locustella, then hirundines, then back to warblers. Weird or what ?

Steve
Weird, until the genetics told a different story. (Old World) Warblers are split up into a number of families after genetic research revealed that hirundines (and larks, bushtits, babblers and bulbuls) are part of the assemblage as well.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 17:46   #35
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Just entered a checklist and discovered that hirundines now come in the middle of warblers !!! Acrocephalus, Locustella, then hirundines, then back to warblers. Weird or what ?

Steve
Actually on one of my checklists bulbuls follow hirundines, then Phylloscs and bush-warblers.

Hmmm

Edit: gusasp beat me to it!

Last edited by Jeff hopkins : Thursday 8th August 2019 at 17:55.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 18:14   #36
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Another discovery: Mountain White-eye (Zosterops montanus) is gone, likely lumped in with japonicus, like IOC.

Digging further, Oriental White-eye is renamed Indian White-eye, Japanese White-eye renamed Warbling White-eye, and Zosterops Simplex split off as Swinhoe's White-eye.

Violet Crow is split from Slender-billed.
Papuan Grassbird is split from Tawny.
Stierling's Wren-warbler split from Miombo.
Hartert's Camaroptera split from Green-backed (but it doesn't look like grey-backed was split).
Bar-throated Apalis split 4 ways.
Kabobo Apalis split from Chestnut-throated
Winding Cisticola split 5 ways.
Ruwenzori Hill-babbler split from African
Broad-ringed White-eye split 6 ways.
Naung-Mung Scimitar-babbler split from Short-tailed
Mt. Victoria Babax from Chinese
White-tailed Alethe split from Fire-crested
Cape Parrot split from Brown-necked
Blue Chaffinch split into Tenerife Chaffinch and Gran Canaria Chaffinch
Amami Thrush Split from Scaly
Abyssinian and Kivu Ground-Thrushes lumped.
Miombo Sunbird split into eastern & western species
Eastern Double-collared Sunbird split 3 ways.
Golden-winged Grosbeak split into Arabian Grosbeak and Socotra Grosbeak
West African Seedeater split from Streaky-headed
Zarudny's Sparrow split from Desert
Angola Waxbill split from Swee
Aceh Bulbul split from Orange-spotted
Eastern Mountain-Greenbul split 4 ways.
Santa Cruz Shrikebill split from Black-throated
Fanti Drongo split from Velvet-mantled
Glossy-backed Drongo split from Fork-tailed
Square-tailed drongo is split into Common Square-tailed and Western Square-tailed Drongos
Variable Pitohui split 3 ways
Papuan Sitella split from Variable
Ashy Cuckooshrike split into Madagascar and Comoros
Black-headed Batis split into Eastern and Western
Dimorphic Jewel-babbler split from Blue
Dulit Partridge split from Long-billed
Black-fronted Francolin from Chestnut-naped
Tibetan Eared-pheasant split from White-eared
Barred Honey-buzzard split into Philippine and Sulawesi
Papuan Marsh-harrier split from Eastern
Madagascar Harrier split from Reunion
Morepork (including Tasmanian ssp.) split from Southern Boobook

Last edited by Jeff hopkins : Thursday 8th August 2019 at 21:47.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 21:16   #37
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Another discovery: Mountain White-eye (Zosterops montanus) is gone, likely lumped in with japonicus, like IOC.

Digging further, Oriental White-eye is renamed Indian White-eye, Japanese White-eye renamed Warbling White-eye, and Zosterops Simplex split off as Swinhoe's White-eye.
It's not nearly as simple as anything being renamed, assuming it's inline with what happened in the IOC. A lot of species boundaries moved, and new subspecies created and others restricted, so you can't just rename your sightings and be done - you'll pretty much have to go back to localities and try to puzzle it out from scratch.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 22:04   #38
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No they're not saying what they are doing. Just that they are changing things around. And they do it according to a list that is Cornell's, and that nobody gets to see.
The eBird/Clements taxonomy is public, and the newest version is published around the same time each year. Last year I think it was a day or three after the taxonomy update was finished on eBird. A changelog is included and it's not terribly difficult to read through and see what your changes will have been.

However I understand your point that it would be nice to see the changes more readily - like a personalized report or a way that species affected by the most recent taxonomic update would be highlighted in your lists. I would love some feature like this.

However eBird is free, is developed by a University with limited staff on a limited budget, and cannot magically be everything to everyone. They have a wishlist of public wants a mile long, I know, as well as their own development priorities. It's ever improving but of course I too have things I've been pining for for years.
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Old Thursday 8th August 2019, 22:20   #39
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It's not nearly as simple as anything being renamed, assuming it's inline with what happened in the IOC. A lot of species boundaries moved, and new subspecies created and others restricted, so you can't just rename your sightings and be done - you'll pretty much have to go back to localities and try to puzzle it out from scratch.
Yeah, I knew I probably oversimplified it. The good news is I probably have all three species still covered (excluding the loss of Mountain White-eye). Not sure about Hume's.
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 04:40   #40
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Now I know what its like for people who collapse in tears when Instagram is down. Ebird is down.
Thank you everyone for your patience while eBird is down—we’re working to bring things back up soon. In the meantime we recommend tracking sightings using offline checklists on eBird Mobile, and submitting when the website is back up.
https://twitter.com/Team_eBird/statu...56612656766976 .
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 10:30   #41
Jeff hopkins
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Now I know what its like for people who collapse in tears when Instagram is down. Ebird is down.
Thank you everyone for your patience while eBird is down—we’re working to bring things back up soon. In the meantime we recommend tracking sightings using offline checklists on eBird Mobile, and submitting when the website is back up.
https://twitter.com/Team_eBird/statu...56612656766976 .
Back up as of this AM, EDT. Still no revised checklist, tho.
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 11:19   #42
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Just entered a checklist and discovered that hirundines now come in the middle of warblers !!! Acrocephalus, Locustella, then hirundines, then back to warblers. Weird or what ?

Steve
Order makes no differnce online where a search is easy, a field guide is another matter and I, personally, get fed up with the continuing rearrangements, hardly any field guides follow the same order.
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 14:08   #43
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Ok, I know this is totally unnecessary work when the update will be posted extremely soon, but I can't help it. I think I figured out all the 107 splits. Together with the aforementioned and Jeff's investigation, there are the following 50. No great surprises, many already recognized by NACC or SACC:

Stejneger's Scoter
Comoros Green Pigeon
Yellowish Imperial Pigeon
Bornean Frogmouth
Green-headed Hillstar
Blue-vented Hummingbird
Gough Moorhen
Subantarctic Shearwater
Bannerman's Shearwater
Andean Ibis
Black-rumped Buttonquail
Sula Scops Owl
Siau Scops Owl
Black-capped Paradise Kingfisher
Necklaced Barbet
Red-backed Flameback
Iberian Green Woodpecker
Socorro Parakeet
Rainbow Lorikeet split 6 ways (but curiously not Biak Lorikeet)
Venezuelan Tyrannulet
Small-headed Elaenia
Coopmans's Elaenia
Tepui Elaenia
Ceara Woodcreeper
Flame Bowerbird
Western Fieldwren
Tanimbar Friarbird
Biak Whistler (out of Little Shrikethrush, but no other splits)
Sharpe's Drongo
Norfolk Robin
North Island Robin
Rufous-capped Lark
Cinereous Bulbul
Klages's Gnatcatcher
Rio Negro Gnatcatcher
Inambari Gnatcatcher
Chattering Gnatwren
Yucatan Gnatcatcher
Campina Thrush
Pantepui Thrush
Indochinese Blue Flycatcher
Chinese Shortwing
Taiwan Shortwing
Himalayan Shortwing
Persian Wheatear
Aldabra Fody

The 3 new species are most likely Rote Leaf Warbler and the mentioned Blue-throated Hillstar and Cream-eyed Bulbul.

The lumps are probably the previously mentioned plus Bogota Sunangel, Forbes's Snipe and Erlanger's Lark.

As to the 48 extinct species, I've only come up with 42. All I found are recognized by BLI, but many not by IOC. I will be interesting to see if they will follow. Those that I find are listed below. Any ideas which 6 species I've missed?

Mauritius Sheldgoose
Reunion Sheldgoose
Finsch's Duck
Amsterdam Wigeon
Mauritius Duck
Mauritius Wood Pigeon
Mauritius Turtle-Dove
Reunion Pigeon
Rodrigues Pigeon
St. Helena Cuckoo
Red Rail
Rodrigues Rail
Reunion Rail
Hawkins's Rail
Hodgen's Waterhen
Reunion Gallinule
New Caledonian Gallinule
Mascarene Coot
St. Helena Rail & St. Helena Crake (though they mix up the names; podarces also unusually placed in Atlantisia)
Ascension Crake
Large St. Helena Petrel
Small St. Helena Petrel
Bermuda Night Heron
Mascarene Night Herons (3 species)
Bermuda Hawk
Bermuda Saw-whet Owl
Mascarene Owls (3 species, unusually placed in Otus)
Reunion Owl
Mauritius Owl
Rodrigues Owl
Reunion Kestrel
Martinique Amazon
Guadeloupe Amazon
Guadeloupe Parakeet
Oceanic Parrot
Broad-billed Parrot
Rodrigues Parrot
Mauritius Gray Parrot (interestingly i Lophopsittaca, not Psittacula)
Bermuda Towhee
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 14:15   #44
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Originally Posted by Steve Lister View Post
Just entered a checklist and discovered that hirundines now come in the middle of warblers !!! Acrocephalus, Locustella, then hirundines, then back to warblers. Weird or what ?

Steve
check out the phylogenetic tree here:-

http://jboyd.net/Taxo/List21.html#sylvioidea

cheers,
James
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 14:34   #45
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I think I figured out all the 107 splits.
Off the top of my head, Venezuelan Tyrannulet and Coopman's Elaenia were already recognized by Clements/eBird, perhaps both in the 2018 update, or the Elaenia even in 2017, I don't recall?

It really is fun to look at this stuff, I catch myself doing it as well and doing (and re-doing) detective work also. Yes it will all be published shortly, but it's fun to think about, and I invariably learn (or re-learn) little tidbits.
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 14:40   #46
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Off the top of my head, Venezuelan Tyrannulet and Coopman's Elaenia were already recognized by Clements/eBird, perhaps both in the 2018 update, or the Elaenia even in 2017, I don't recall?

It really is fun to look at this stuff, I catch myself doing it as well and doing (and re-doing) detective work also. Yes it will all be published shortly, but it's fun to think about, and I invariably learn (or re-learn) little tidbits.
You are so right, my bad on the Elaenia and the Tyrannulet. Then we have two more to find!
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 16:35   #47
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You are so right, my bad on the Elaenia and the Tyrannulet. Then we have two more to find!
Did you count Hume's White-eye?

Also, my speculation on Burmese Bushtit appears to be wrong. As of now, it's still shown as a "group".
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 17:05   #48
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You are so right, my bad on the Elaenia and the Tyrannulet. Then we have two more to find!
Thank you very much. Now I can get to work.

Comparing Clements with IOC, I find 266 splits yielding 329 species, so you know where to look further. All of your 100+ species are in the IOC list, although sometimes under different names (is the Red-tailed Wheatear splitoff the Kurdish Wheatear or the Persian Wheatear?)

The interesting thing is the lopsided distribution. The majority of the splits are oscines (after all that grumbling about too many tyrannids, there are just three suboscine splits - a woodcreeper and two elaenias.) And the vast majority of those oscines are in Africa or Asia, with a handful in Australasia, and very few in the Americas. A hundred more reasons to travel to the other side of the world?

Many thanks -- Daan
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 17:58   #49
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Good work by all involved. I had been thinking of contacting ebird and suggesting one Jeff Hopkins from Pennsylvania had caused ebird to be down by ceaselessly rechecking his life list. Nate Swick tweeted: Can anyone access @Team_eBird right now? I know the annual update causes some crazy stuff to happen but I've never had it completely disappear before.
Team Ebird responded: Power outage due to storm in Ithaca. Working on getting things up and running.


I was hoping the outage was related to the taxonomy update.
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Old Friday 9th August 2019, 18:06   #50
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Cornell, has been good about keeping up with the Americas. They specifically said when they took over that their basis was to match NACC and SACC. They added the Australian Committee a few years later. So if there aren't a lot of splits in the Americas or Australasia it's because of the committees, not Cornell.

OTOH, they've been dragging their feet on Africa and Asia because there aren't really any true committees, per se. This just catches up with IOC on those regions.

Can't speak to why it's oscines and not sub-oscines.
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