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Borneo in a week in March 2016 - a post work trip.

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Old Friday 25th March 2016, 07:21   #1
simmojunior
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Borneo in a week in March 2016 - a post work trip.

After my big trip to New Zealand, the Subantarctic and the Philippines at Christmas, I had planned to save my little remaining leave for something (probably in Europe) in the summer.

However, I found it impossible to resist the opportunity of taking advantage of already being in Singapore on a week's work trip and took the week off after to visit Borneo. After seeking and receiving very helpful advice, I decided on 2 nights in Sepilok, 2 in the Kinabatangan and 3 in Mount Kinabalu National Park as the best way of using my limited time.

The trip was hugely successful as I managed 189 species in the week and 89 lifers. I managed a further five lifers in the week before in Singapore, all species which I later saw again in Borneo.

I did not use guides, except at the Kinabatangan Jungle Camp where I was fortunate to be able to use the superb Romzi for half my stay due to their being few other guests. However, I would not recommend staying there despite the birding due to their determination to charge extra for seemingly everything and the lack of things to do between the very spaced out boat trips (6.30-8am & 4-6pm). I stayed at Sepilok Forest Edge Resort, which was nice but a bit far from the excellent Rainforest Discovery Centre, and J Residence at Mount Kinabalu. The latter is highly recommended as is excellent value, clean, comfortable and well situated near the park entrance. I got around largely by taxi or walking but took a public bus from near KJC (I got dropped off at some junction) to Mount Kinabalu that worked quite well.

Day by day reports to follow.
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Old Friday 25th March 2016, 07:37   #2
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Singapore 6th - 11th March

I was working during the days in Singapore so there is not enough for me to write a day by day report but I did enjoy a total of four visits to the Botanical Gardens, conveniently situated near my hotel. Each visit was just over an hour long, two were before work and two were after work.

This produced a total of 37 species including 5 lifers, all things I inexplicably missed in my otherwise successful trip to Peninsular Malaysia last year. The five lifers were Crimson Sunbird, Grey-headed Fish Eagle, Buffy Fish Owl, Oriental Pied Hornbill and Long-tailed Parakeet. 4 of them were on the hugely successful walk on my last morning!

Other species seen included Stork-billed Kingfisher, Pin-striped Tit-Babbler, White-throated Kingfisher, Coppersmith Barbet and Brown-throated Sunbird.
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Old Friday 25th March 2016, 09:13   #3
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Saturday 12th March 2016

Unfortunately there was no sensible morning direct flights from Singapore to Sabah so I had to fly very early to Kuala Lumpur before getting on to a connection to Sandakan. The four hour lay off in Kuala Lumpur was uninspiring but I did see the only Paddyfield Pipit, Red-wattled Lapwing, Large-billed Crow and Common Myna of the trip.

Eventually, I arrived in Sandakan mid-afternoon. Even from the airport, there were numerous common birds like Brahminy Kite, Javan Myna, Zebra Dove, Cattle Egret and Great Egret. As soon as I collected my bags, I got a cheap taxi for the half an hour drive to the Sepilok Forest Edge Resort. The journey suggested that, despite the heat, Borneo was going to be full of birds as, from the taxi, I saw Asian Glossy Starling, Oriental Magpie Robin, Tree Sparrow, Glossy Swiftlet, Pacific Swallow and Yellow-vented Bulbul.

As soon as I checked in, a large raptor (probably a Wallace's Hawk Eagle) flew overhead but I had not yet taken my binoculars out my bag. Once I had dumped my bags and got my binoculars out, I quickly found Little Green Pigeon, Olive-backed Sunbird and Brown-throated Sunbird all in the hotel grounds.

I then walked in the round in to town. It was a bit hot but I still saw Ashy Tailorbird, Crimson Sunbird and Red-throated Sunbird. A stroll around Sepilok Jungle Resort's grounds was productive with Red-eyed Bulbul, Spectacled Bulbul, Black-headed Bulbul, a flyover Oriental Honey Buzzard, Common Sandpiper, a superb Black Hornbill, Asian Palm Swift, Pied Fantail and my first Bornean lifer in the form of a flock of Silver-rumped Spinetail showing well over the lake. I continued walking up and down the road for a bit, enjoying the further lifer in a pair of Scarlet-backed Flowerpeckers, as well as Blue-crowned Hanging Parrot, Chestnut Munia, Rufous-tailed Tailorbird and Pink-necked Green Pigeon.

At 6pm, I decided to join the scheduled night walk at the Orang Utan Rehabilitation Centre. This proved a good decision as I was soon put on to a perched Bornean Falconet, my first Bornean Endemic! Other birds that I saw before it got dark included Long-tailed Parakeet and Dollarbird. Indian Cuckoo (still never seen one!), Plaintive Cuckoo and Black-and-Yellow Broadbill will also heard. The night walk itself was pleasant as we saw 2 distant Red Giant Flying Squirrels, a Pygmy Flying Squirrel (unsure of exact id - sorry) and a brief Mouse Deer. I also saw a white viper which I have attached a photo of so would appreciate help on the id. Unfortunately, there were no nocturnal birds other than a really distant calling Brown Wood Owl and no sign of the regular sleeping Hooded Pitta.

However, it had been an excellent start with 3 lifers in my first afternoon and I was excited for tomorrow but in much need of some sleep!
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Old Saturday 26th March 2016, 07:16   #4
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Sunday 13th March

With only one full day in Sepilok, I decided to skip the hotel's breakfast and take a 5.45 am taxi to the Rainforest Discovery Centre. This meant I was at the top of the "Bristlehead Tower" for dawn.

The very first birds I saw as it got light were a superb flock of 4 Bushy-crested Hornbills fly slowly past the tower. Other birds seen from the tower in the first ten minutes of light included Black-nest Swiftlet (I think that is what they are!), Purple-throated Sunbird, Orange-bellied Flowerpecker and Slender-billed Crow. There was also my first troop of Pig-tailed Macaque and a Giant Squirrel. Indian Cuckoo and Black-and-Yellow Broadbill were as always calling but not showing.

I then headed to the Trogon Tower and, in the next hour, enjoyed both Long-billed and Thick-billed Spiderhunter, Brown and Grey-streaked Flycatcher, a brief flyby Green Broadbill, Square-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo, a distant Banded Woodpecker, Hill Myna, Buff-rumped Woodpecker, Buff-vented and Cream-vented Bulbul, Bronzed Drongo and 2 unusually showy Violet Cuckoos.

A return along the canopy walkway and to the Bristlehead Tower produced further birds like Ruby-cheeked Sunbird, Blue-eared Barbet and Bornean Brown Barbet. There was also a Wallace's Hawk Eagle on a distant nest and a juvenile showing well close to the walkway. It was an amazing start to the morning! The only minor disappointment was no Bristleheads, although I had expected them to be a long shot in such short time.

At about 9am, I left the walkway and headed in to the forest picking up further birds like Yellow-rumped Flowerpecker, Streaked Bulbul, Crested Serpent Eagle and Black-winged Flycatcher Shrike. The Hornbill tower was quiet but the small Broadbill Tower was anything but with a Black-and-red Broadbill, Yellow-eared Spiderhunter, Lesser Green Leafbird, Hairy-backed Bulbul, Olive-winged Bulbul, Raffles' Malkoha, Green Iora, and, best of all, a showy pair of Orange-backed Woodpeckers.

By 11am, I was in much need of some food and a rest so I headed off out the centre. I did not really find food apart from a drink and an ice cream at Sepilok B & B but the birding was still productive as an Oriental Darter flew over the lake and I found several of the endemic Dusky Munias amongst the abundant Chestnut Munias.

After a much needed rest, I headed back to the RDC picking up Spotted Dove in the car park. Just as I got to the Bristlehead Tower, the rain started to fall so I sheltered there for a bit. Once the rain passed, a few birds came out including a flock of Fiery Minivet and a White-bellied Erponis. A very brief woodpecker appeared to be a Crimson-winged but I did not get any sort of decent view of it.

I then headed along the walkway again to find from some Malaysian photographers that a Banded Kingfisher had been sitting in a tree for half an hour but had now gone. Thankfully, after about a 40 minute wait, it returned and I enjoyed superb views. This was a real bonus as this was not a species that was on my radar for this trip.

After a quick lunch in the small cafe, I headed up along the "Pitta Path" in to the forest. The next hour or so was really quiet, apart from the endemic White-crowned Shama and a nice Short-tailed Babbler, until some speculative taping elicited a response from my key target.

It was however quite distant but luckily the path headed towards it. Eventually I got quite close and decided to head in to the forest. This resulted in numerous unpleasant rattan stings but it was certainly worth it when I managed superb views of a stunning Black-crowned Pitta! After finding my way back to the path, I then flushed another one before heading back towards the Broadbill Tower.

The journey there produced further great birds such as a flyby Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher and a stunning Grey-and-buff Woodpecker. The Broadbill Tower was quieter than earlier but I did see my fifth woodpecker species of the day with a Rufous Woodpecker close by. A final look at the canopy walkway produced more views of Bushy-crested Hornbill and my first Black-naped Monarch of the trip.

I then scanned the vast swift flock over the lake, which included new species like Grey-rumped Treeswift, Brown-backed Needletail and Edible Nest Swiftlet. Despite being absolutely shattered after such a full day, I decided to join the night walk in the hope of owls or rare forest mammals. This, however, proved to be a disappointment although I did see the only Rufous Piculet and Racket-tailed Drongo of the trip.

Despite the disappointing end, this had been one of the best birding days I had ever had in the tropics and was an extraordinary start to my trip.
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Old Saturday 26th March 2016, 17:38   #5
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Originally Posted by simmojunior View Post
I also saw a white viper which I have attached a photo of so would appreciate help on the id.
It looks like a Pit Viper. Probably one of the 'Wagler's' Pit Vipers, although Pit Vipers are quite hard to id.

The form(s) on Borneo are currently placed under this name: Tropidolaemus subannulatus, although as you can see from the link, this is likely to be a complex of cryptic species, yet to be resolved.

I would say it is pale green rather than white, which can just about be seen in the photo, but with camera flash/torch light over exposing the image.

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Old Sunday 27th March 2016, 09:33   #6
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It looks like a Pit Viper. Probably one of the 'Wagler's' Pit Vipers, although Pit Vipers are quite hard to id.

The form(s) on Borneo are currently placed under this name: Tropidolaemus subannulatus, although as you can see from the link, this is likely to be a complex of cryptic species, yet to be resolved.

I would say it is pale green rather than white, which can just about be seen in the photo, but with camera flash/torch light over exposing the image.

Cheers,
Thanks Gareth. Yes, it was quite greenish in the field.
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Old Sunday 27th March 2016, 10:14   #7
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Monday 14th March

After yesterday's exhausting day, I took a more relaxed approach and just strolled around the hotel grounds and road this morning. This produced a couple of new species for the trip like Baya Weaver and Yellow-bellied Prinia as well as the only Collared Kingfisher and White-breasted Waterhens I saw in Borneo. I even had breakfast in the hotel and from the veranda, I noticed a lot of birds coming to a flowering tree. These included various Sunbirds, Lesser Green Leafbird and a superb lifer, a Brown-capped Pygmy Woodpecker.

At 9am, I was picked up for the drive to Bilit, from where I would catch a boat to KJC. The journey was dull through palm oil plantations with the only new bird being White-breasted Woodswallow. From the boat in to the lodge, I saw Purple Heron, Blue-throated Bee-eater, Crested Serpent Eagle, Great Egret and Grey-headed Fish Eagle.

Once I got to the camp, nothing seemed to be scheduled until the boat ride at 4 so I decided to walk the loop trail. It was blisteringly hot but I did get two lifers (Storm's Stork and Black-capped Babbler) and a trip tick (Malaysian Blue Flycatcher). The rest of the time, I just relaxed in my room and the restaurant area.

Fortunately the other guests had decided to pay extra to go elephant searching so this meant that I had Romzi to myself and we could go birding. We headed to the Mennangol River as I picked up some embarrassing lifers on route like Intermediate Egret and Green Imperial Pigeon. Other birds seen included Striated Heron, Blue-eared Kingfisher, Stork-billed Kingfisher, Black-and-red Broadbill, Little Egret and Whiskered Tern.

The Mennangol River was packed with tourist boats but we saw a superb Jerdon's Baza, a distant but spectacular Rufous-bellied Eagle and four primate species (Pig-tailed Macaque, Long-tailed Macaque, Proboscis Monkey and Silvery Leaf Monkey).

Moving a bit further along to avoid the crowds, I decided to particularly target White-crowned Hornbill. Unfortunately, we did not find our quarry but this was more than made up for by several Oriental Pied Hornbill and a superb Rhinoceros Hornbill, a bird I particularly wanted to see after missing them in Malaysia last year. We heading back to camp to be greeted by a superb Malayan Civet near to the dining room.

After dinner, I decided to take advantage of the fact that I'd be the only guest and pay the small extra charge for the night cruise. Very soon after setting off, we picked up the shining eyes of a Saltwater Crocodile. A little later, we heard a Large Frogmouth calling but unfortunately it went silent after a little bit of response to tape.

We headed back along the Mennangol River seeing a Buffy Fish Owl and several Black-crowned Night Herons before hearing the Frogmouth again. This time the bird continued to respond. Romzi decided it would be best to leave the boat and head in to the forest to look for it. It did not take long for him to located the bird and I enjoyed superb views of this extraordinary species singing. I was so delighted that I completely forgot about my main target of Bay Owl, which we did not hear all evening.

It was only my second full day in Borneo and I had already seen an amazing array of rare species, I simply could not believe how well it was going.
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Old Monday 28th March 2016, 08:19   #8
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Tuesday 15th March

I luckily had the boat to myself again and my main target was, of course, the Bornean Ground Cuckoo. Romzi explained that March was a good time to hear them but it was still going to be very difficult to get a view of one.

The day, however, got off to a brilliant start as Romzi spotted a female Orang-Utan in a fig tree as we got in to a boat. I watched it for a bit before heading down river in such of our quarry. It did not take long for us to hear the bizarre calls so we headed closer to the bank. We started playing the tape and two birds were definitely responding as I almost ignored a Yellow Bittern flying in to the reeds. It did not take long for Romzi to announce that he'd got the Cuckoo and he managed to get me on to it as I watched it sit in the thickets. It then flew down so we repositioned the boat before I spotted it again as it just sat there. This was unreal - these birds are usually impossibly difficult. We even managed to put some tourists in a nearby boat on to it.

The rest of the boat trip obviously did not continue in this vein despite optimistic speculative playback of species including Bornean Bristlehead and Giant Pitta. Nevertheless, it was still very pleasant with a superb flock of 6 Storm's Stork, Bold-striped Tit-babbler, Crested Myna, Common Iora, White-chested Babbler and Greater Coucal. A brief calling Hooded Pitta however remained stubbornly unresponsive.

After a late breakfast, I headed with Romzi for a walk around the loop trail. The intense heat made things difficult but I was delighted that a Black-and-Yellow Broadbill came in to tape as this is one of my favourite South East Asian birds. Better still was a Scarlet-rumped Trogon that Romzi picked up perched close to the path.

There was not much to do until the afternoon boat so I just rested before heading out in the boat with some other tourists and this time, another guide. This was quite frustrating as it was difficult to birdwatch but I did see a Yellow-bellied Bulbul and a soaring Lesser Adjutant. I was however unable to get on to the Puff-backed Bulbul that Romzi could see from his boat. It was also nice to see a Golden-ringed Cat Snake and enjoy great views of Proboscis Monkey in beautiful evening light.
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Old Thursday 31st March 2016, 08:26   #9
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Wednesday 16th March

I had assumed that the morning boat was included in my package but when I was told I had to pay extra, I decided to instead use the morning to lie in. There was not much to do until 10.30 when I was picked up from KJC and headed back towards Sandakan.

A couple of Australian tourists had requested to go to Gomantong Caves so I was happy that I was told I would be joining them. This allowed me to identify my first Mossy-nest Swiftlets within the extraordinary if somewhat unpleasant caves. Better still was I encountered two mixed flocks on the short walks to and from the cave. The first one contained a superb Spotted Fantail, Chestnut-winged Babbler and Chestnut-rumped Babbler, while the second one held Sooty-capped Babbler, Rufous-crowned Babbler and Rufous-chested Flycatcher. These were particularly pleasing as Babblers had been noticeable by their absence up until now.

In the car park, I spotted another lifer as a distant Bat Hawk sat in a tree before another one flew overhead catching a swift!

It was early afternoon by the time I got dropped off at the junction, where I immediately caught a comfortable public coach up to Mount Kinabalu. The four hour journey was uneventful but I did see several Long-tailed Shrikes.

I arrived at Mount Kinabalu just before dark, allowing me to get two further lifers (Chestnut-hooded Laughingthrush and Ashy Drongo), as well as my first Little Pied Flycatcher and White-throated Fantail of the trip.
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Old Thursday 31st March 2016, 12:36   #10
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Well done on Ground Cuckoo

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Originally Posted by simmojunior View Post
Tuesday 15th March

I luckily had the boat to myself again and my main target was, of course, the Bornean Ground Cuckoo. Romzi explained that March was a good time to hear them but it was still going to be very difficult to get a view of one.

The day, however, got off to a brilliant start as Romzi spotted a female Orang-Utan in a fig tree as we got in to a boat. I watched it for a bit before heading down river in such of our quarry. It did not take long for us to hear the bizarre calls so we headed closer to the bank. We started playing the tape and two birds were definitely responding as I almost ignored a Yellow Bittern flying in to the reeds. It did not take long for Romzi to announce that he'd got the Cuckoo and he managed to get me on to it as I watched it sit in the thickets. It then flew down so we repositioned the boat before I spotted it again as it just sat there. This was unreal - these birds are usually impossibly difficult. We even managed to put some tourists in a nearby boat on to it.

The rest of the boat trip obviously did not continue in this vein despite optimistic speculative playback of species including Bornean Bristlehead and Giant Pitta. Nevertheless, it was still very pleasant with a superb flock of 6 Storm's Stork, Bold-striped Tit-babbler, Crested Myna, Common Iora, White-chested Babbler and Greater Coucal. A brief calling Hooded Pitta however remained stubbornly unresponsive.

After a late breakfast, I headed with Romzi for a walk around the loop trail. The intense heat made things difficult but I was delighted that a Black-and-Yellow Broadbill came in to tape as this is one of my favourite South East Asian birds. Better still was a Scarlet-rumped Trogon that Romzi picked up perched close to the path.

There was not much to do until the afternoon boat so I just rested before heading out in the boat with some other tourists and this time, another guide. This was quite frustrating as it was difficult to birdwatch but I did see a Yellow-bellied Bulbul and a soaring Lesser Adjutant. I was however unable to get on to the Puff-backed Bulbul that Romzi could see from his boat. It was also nice to see a Golden-ringed Cat Snake and enjoy great views of Proboscis Monkey in beautiful evening light.
Black and Yellow Broadbill is probably my favourite Broadbill too (Sarah)
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Old Thursday 31st March 2016, 21:40   #11
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Thursday 17th March

I had been told that Mount Kinabalu would be tough going and I'd struggle to find many of the endemics in only two days. Today however suggested that this was untrue as the day got off to a super start.

In the half light as I entered the park, I encountered my first new endemic of the day - Bornean Whistling Thrush. Heading along the main road, I added Chestnut-crested Yuhina and Eyebrowed Jungle Flycatcher before encountering my first proper bird wave. This contained several birds that I was familiar with from my time at Fraser's Hill on the peninsula last year such as Everett's White-eye, Mugimaki Flycatcher and Grey-chinned Minivet. However, it also included several lifers like Temminck's Sunbird, Black-capped White-eye, Bornean Treepie and Indigo Flycatcher.

This was quickly followed by another bird wave, which contained another lifer in some noisy Sunda Laughingthrushes. This was exciting stuff!

I then headed up the Pandanus Trail, picking up some more lifers amongst the numerous bird waves like Bornean Whistler, Yellow-breasted Warbler and a surprise Ruddy Cuckoo Dove.

I then headed down the Kliau View trail back to the entrance as I heard this was good for Fruithunter. This proved to be an excellent decision as I flushed a bright orange bird off the path. I was a bit confused as to what it was until I located it again perched on a nearby brunch - it was a stunning Orange-headed Thrush that even allowed for a photograph! This was swiftly followed by a pair of Orange-backed Woodpeckers. It was not even 9am but yet the day had already been brilliant.

I then decided to walk along the road to the Silau-Silau trail, encountering some Mountain Tailorbirds and the first of several Bornean Green Magpies. The Silau-Silau trail was also productive as I saw Ochraceous Bulbul, Common Green Magpie, Ferruginous Flycatcher amongst a large flycatcher flock and a very responsive pair of White-browed Shortwing. The only downer was that the Whitehead's Broadbill nest that I had been given directions for was no longer active.

The new birds continued to come on a stroll down the power station road as I encountered some Grey-throated Babblers, an Arctic Warbler, a superb Bornean Flowerpecker and some large dark Swiftlets that I assume must be Waterfall Swiftlet?

After lunch in the restaurant outside the park, I headed to the base of the Mempening Trail as I heard this area was good for Whitehead's Broadbill and Trogon. I am not sure if this is the case but it was certainly a productive areas as I located Sunda Cuckooshrike, Emerald Dove, Hair-crested Drongo and Crimson-winged Woodpecker.

Some calling Crimson-headed Partridge were not responsive to tape but my search for them meant that I stumbled on a female Whitehead's Trogon, which I enjoyed decent views of as it sat on a nearby branch!

I then headed back up the Silau-Silau trail again encountering a superb male Fruithunter close to the river and a family party of Crimson-headed Partridge further up.

A stroll up and down the power station road failed to produce any further new birds apart from Grey Wagtail and it was starting to get dark so I decided to call it a day. It had been a superb if somewhat exhausting first day on the mountain but I still had plenty to find tomorrow.
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Old Saturday 2nd April 2016, 21:06   #12
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Friday 18th March

I managed to arrange a taxi to the Timpohon Gate for 5.45 this morning so was up there as it got light. This turned out to be a good move as one of the first birds I saw was a singing Sunda Bush Warbler. This was followed by several other new birds like Little Cuckoo Dove, Mountain Leaf Warbler, Snowy-browed Flycatcher and a juvenile Sunda Cuckoo.

I tried to go through the Timpohon Gate once it opened but I was not able to as I was unaware I had to arrange a permit at HQ. This meant I never got the opportunity to look for species like Mountain Blackeye and Pale-faced Bulbul. However, I did spot a juvenile / female Taiga Flycatcher on the power station fence and some Mountain Imperial Pigeons flying over.

The Bukit Ular trail was closed so I wandered down the Power Station Road, encountering numerous bird waves but no new species until a stop at the Kliau Gap View produced a superb Kinabalu Serpent Eagle drifting overhead. Calling Red-breasted Partridges were annoyingly unresponsive.

I then headed down the Mempening Trail, which was exceptionally good. The first bird wave was quite small and uninspiring until I noticed a fairly large, bright green bird - a male Whitehead's Broadbill! The rest of the trail was equally productive with numerous bird waves including a further Whitehead's Broadbill, Checker-throated Woodpecker, Golden-naped Barbet, Mountain Barbet, Black-and-crimson Oriole and Bald-headed Laughingthrush.

I then stopped briefly to watch some researchers ringing Black-capped White-eyes and Mountain Tailorbirds before having a quick lunch. I then walked up and down the river to look for Bornean Forktail but drew a complete blank.

A walk up the Silau-Silau trail also drew a blank for new birds so I hitched a lift back up to the Timpohon Gate to look for a Siberian Rubythroat that had been present behind the power station the day before. Unfortunately, I could not find the Rubythroat but I was delighted to find 5 Wreathed Hornbills flying overhead as well as Blue-and-White Flycatcher and Eyebrowed Thrush. I also saw several Swiftlets that appeared to have a greenish gloss so I would appreciate confirmation if anyone knows whether the swiftlets at the gate are Borneans?

I then headed back down the road but unfortunately the fog rolled in mid afternoon so there were not many birds. I headed up the Kliau View Trail in a desperate last attempt to find Whitehead's Spiderhunter. Unfortunately, this one of the Whitehead's trio would go unseen but some speculative taping at a Babbler flock did produce a pair of Mountain Wren Babblers.

As it was getting late, I decided that I would have one last attempt to find Bornean Forktail but there was no sign. These birds are not usually this difficult according to trip reports! I did however find a superb pair of Bornean Stubtail, which was a nice way to end another spectacular day.
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Old Saturday 2nd April 2016, 21:11   #13
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Saturday 19th March

After the exhausting schedule of the last two days, I had a little lie in this morning until around 7.30. This still gave me a couple of hours before my taxi to the airport so I had one final attempt to find Forktail, deciding this was more likely than the two other likely endemics I was missing (Whitehead's Spiderhunter and Red-breasted Partridge).

Remarkably, this proved successful as I enjoyed brief but decent views of a pair along the Silau-Silau trail. There also appeared to be an increase in the number of migrants as I saw Taiga Flycatcher, 2 Blue-and-white Flycatcher and an Eyebrowed Thrush around the HQ.

At around 10 am, the taxi came to pick me up to go to the airport in Kota Kinabalu, from where I caught a flight back to Singapore before my flight back to the UK. I would obviously loved more time but I cannot believe I was almost able to clean up at Mount Kinabalu in only two days.
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Old Saturday 2nd April 2016, 21:13   #14
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Full bird list

I positively identified a further 6 species that were heard only (Hooded Pitta, Brown Wood Owl, Plaintive Cuckoo, Indian Cuckoo, Red-breasted Partridge and Collared Owlet) but here is a full list of birds seen. I have not done a mammal list as I have no idea of the identity of the numerous squirrels and treeshrews I saw.

Singapore

1. Red Junglefowl
2. Black Swan
3. Mute Swan
4. Black-crowned Night Heron
5. Grey Heron
6. Brahminy Kite
7. White-bellied Sea Eagle
8. Grey-headed Fish Eagle
9. White-breasted Waterhen
10. Feral Pigeon
11. Spotted Dove
12. Pink-necked Green Pigeon
13. Long-tailed Parakeet
14. Buffy Fish Owl
15. Germain’s Swiftlet
16. Dollarbird
17. Stork-billed Kingfisher
18. White-throated Kingfisher
19. Collared Kingfisher
20. Blue-tailed Bee-eater
21. Oriental Pied Hornbill
22. Coppersmith Barbet
23. Black-naped Oriole
24. House Crow
25. Yellow-vented Bulbul
26. Barn Swallow
27. Pacific Swallow
28. Pin-striped Tit-babbler
29. Javan Myna
30. Asian Glossy Starling
31. Oriental Magpie Robin
32. Brown Flycatcher
33. Brown-throated Sunbird
34. Olive-backed Sunbird
35. Crimson Sunbird
36. Tree Sparrow
37. Scaly-breasted Munia

Kuala Lumpur

1. Great Egret
2. Red-wattled Lapwing
3. Germain’s Swiftlet
4. House Crow
5. Large-billed Crow
6. Asian Glossy Starling
7. Common Myna
8. Javan Myna
9. Barn Swallow
10. Paddyfield Pipit

Borneo

1. Crimson-headed Partridge
2. Storm’s Stork
3. Lesser Adjutant
4. Black-crowned Night Heron
5. Yellow Bittern
6. Striated Heron
7. Purple Heron
8. Little Egret
9. Intermediate Egret
10. Great Egret
11. Cattle Egret
12. Oriental Darter
13. Rufous-bellied Hawk-Eagle
14. Wallace’s Hawk-Eagle
15. Jerdon’s Baza
16. Oriental Honey Buzzard
17. White-bellied Sea-Eagle
18. Brahminy Kite
19. Grey-headed Fish Eagle
20. Crested Serpent Eagle
21. Kinabalu Serpent Eagle
22. Bat Hawk
23. Bornean Falconet
24. Common Sandpiper
25. Ruddy Cuckoo Dove
26. Little Cuckoo Dove
27. Zebra Dove
28. Spotted Dove
29. Emerald Dove
30. Little Green Pigeon
31. Pink-necked Green Pigeon
32. Green Imperial Pigeon
33. Mountain Imperial Pigeon
34. Long-tailed Parakeet
35. Blue-crowned Hanging-Parrot
36. Sunda Cuckoo
37. Violet Cuckoo
38. Square-tailed Drongo-Cuckoo
39. Greater Coucal
40. Bornean Ground Cuckoo
41. Raffles’ Malkoha
42. Buffy Fish Owl
43. Large Frogmouth
44. Asian Palm Swift
45. Grey-rumped Treeswift
46. Waterfall Swift
47. Glossy Swiftlet
48. Bornean Swiftlet
49. Edible-nest Swiftlet
50. Black-nest Swiftlet
51. Mossy-nest Swiftlet
52. Brown-backed Needletail
53. Silver-rumped Spinetail
54. Whitehead’s Trogon
55. Scarlet-rumped Trogon
56. Collared Kingfisher
57. Blue-eared Kingfisher
58. Stork-billed Kingfisher
59. Bornean Banded Kingfisher
60. Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher
61. Blue-throated Bee-eater
62. Dollarbird
63. Bushy-crested Hornbill
64. Oriental Pied Hornbill
65. Asian Black Hornbill
66. Wreathed Hornbill
67. Rhinoceros Hornbill
68. Golden-naped Barbet
69. Mountain Barbet
70. Blue-eared Barbet
71. Brown Barbet
72. Rufous Woodpecker
73. Banded Woodpecker
74. Crimson-winged Woodpecker
75. Checker-throated Woodpecker
76. Orange-backed Woodpecker
77. Rufous Piculet
78. Buff-rumped Wooodpecker
79. Grey-capped Woodpecker
80. Grey-and-buff Woodpecker
81. Black-and-red Broadbill
82. Black-and-yellow Broadbill
83. Green Broadbill
84. Whitehead’s Broadbill
85. Black-crowned Pitta
86. Green Iora
87. Common Iora
88. Lesser Green Leafbird
89. Grey-chinned Minivet
90. Fiery Minivet
91. Black-winged Flycatcher-shrike
92. Sunda Cuckooshrike
93. Bornean Whistler
94. Long-tailed Shrike
95. Black-and-crimson Oriole
96. Ashy Drongo
97. Greater Raquet-tailed Drongo
98. Bronzed Drongo
99. Hair-crested Drongo
100. Slender-billed Crow
101. Bornean Green Magpie
102. Common Green Magpie
103. Bornean Treepie
104. Barn Swallow
105. Pacific Swallow
106. White-breasted Woodswallow
107. Rufous-tailed Tailorbird
108. Ashy Tailorbird
109. Mountain Tailorbird
110. Yellow-bellied Prinia
111. Black-headed Bulbul
112. Olive-winged Bulbul
113. Yellow-vented Bulbul
114. Cream-vented Bulbul
115. Red-eyed Bulbul
116. Spectacled Bulbul
117. Hairy-backed Bulbul
118. Yellow-bellied Bulbul
119. Streaked Bulbul
120. Buff-vented Bulbul
121. Ochraceous Bulbul
122. Arctic Warbler
123. Mountain Leaf Warbler
124. Yellow-breasted Warbler
125. Sunda Bush Warbler
126. Bornean Stubtail
127. Black-capped Babbler
128. Short-tailed Babbler
129. White-chested Babbler
130. Sooty-capped Babbler
131. Rufous-crowned Babbler
132. Mountain Wren-babbler
133. Grey-throated Babbler
134. Chestnut-rumped Babbler
135. Chestnut-winged Babbler
136. Bold-striped Tit-babbler
137. Erponis
138. Chestnut-crested Yuhina
139. Sunda Laughingthrush
140. Chestnut-hooded Laughingthrush
141. Bornean Bald-headed Laughingthrush
142. Black-capped White-eye
143. Everett’s White-eye
144. Javan Myna
145. Crested Myna
146. Hill Myna
147. Asian Glossy Starling
148. Eyebrowed Thrush
149. Fruithunter
150. Bornean Whistling Thrush
151. Oriental Magpie Robin
152. White-crowned Shama
153. Orange-headed Thrush
154. Bornean Forktail
155. Eyebrowed Jungle Flycatcher
156. Ferruginous Flycatcher
157. Grey-streaked Flycatcher
158. Brown Flycatcher
159. Mugimaki Flycatcher
160. Snowy-browed Flycatcher
161. Taiga Flycatcher
162. Rufous-chested Flycatcher
163. Little Pied Flycatcher
164. Blue-and-white Flycatcher
165. Malaysian Blue Flycatcher
166. Indigo Flycatcher
167. White-browed Shortwing
168. White-throated Fantail
169. Spotted Fantail
170. Pied Fantail
171. Black-naped Monarch
172. Scarlet-backed Flowerpecker
173. Orange-bellied Flowerpecker
174. Bornean Flowerpecker
175. Yellow-rumped Flowerpecker
176. Purple-throated Sunbird
177. Olive-backed Sunbird
178. Crimsom Sunbird
179. Temminck’s Sunbird
180. Red-throated Sunbird
181. Brown-throated Sunbird
182. Ruby-cheeked Sunbird
183. Thick-billed Spiderhunter
184. Yellow-eared Spiderhunter
185. Long-billed Spiderhunter
186. Chestnut Munia
187. Dusky Munia
188. Grey Wagtail
189. Baya Weaver
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Old Saturday 2nd April 2016, 21:42   #15
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Thank you for reading, I am happy to answer any questions if someone is planning something similar.

Thanks also in particular to Julian Teh, Max Breckenridge, Simon Mitchell, Daniel Watson, James Eaton and "Halftwo" (sorry, don't know your real name!) for all the helpful information that helped me organise such a successful trip.
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Old Monday 4th April 2016, 12:30   #16
dandsblair
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These are possible before the gate or in trees above

Quote:
Originally Posted by simmojunior View Post
Friday 18th March


I tried to go through the Timpohon Gate once it opened but I was not able to as I was unaware I had to arrange a permit at HQ. This meant I never got the opportunity to look for species like Mountain Blackeye and Pale-faced Bulbul. However, I did spot a juvenile / female Taiga Flycatcher on the power station fence and some Mountain Imperial Pigeons flying over.

The Bukit Ular trail was closed so I wandered down the Power Station Road, encountering numerous bird waves but no new species until a stop at the Kliau Gap View produced a superb Kinabalu Serpent Eagle drifting overhead. Calling Red-breasted Partridges were annoyingly unresponsive.

I then headed down the Mempening Trail, which was exceptionally good. The first bird wave was quite small and uninspiring until I noticed a fairly large, bright green bird - a male Whitehead's Broadbill! The rest of the trail was equally productive with numerous bird waves including a further Whitehead's Broadbill, Checker-throated Woodpecker, Golden-naped Barbet, Mountain Barbet, Black-and-crimson Oriole and Bald-headed Laughingthrush.

I then stopped briefly to watch some researchers ringing Black-capped White-eyes and Mountain Tailorbirds before having a quick lunch. I then walked up and down the river to look for Bornean Forktail but drew a complete blank.

A walk up the Silau-Silau trail also drew a blank for new birds so I hitched a lift back up to the Timpohon Gate to look for a Siberian Rubythroat that had been present behind the power station the day before. Unfortunately, I could not find the Rubythroat but I was delighted to find 5 Wreathed Hornbills flying overhead as well as Blue-and-White Flycatcher and Eyebrowed Thrush. I also saw several Swiftlets that appeared to have a greenish gloss so I would appreciate confirmation if anyone knows whether the swiftlets at the gate are Borneans?

I then headed back down the road but unfortunately the fog rolled in mid afternoon so there were not many birds. I headed up the Kliau View Trail in a desperate last attempt to find Whitehead's Spiderhunter. Unfortunately, this one of the Whitehead's trio would go unseen but some speculative taping at a Babbler flock did produce a pair of Mountain Wren Babblers.

As it was getting late, I decided that I would have one last attempt to find Bornean Forktail but there was no sign. These birds are not usually this difficult according to trip reports! I did however find a superb pair of Bornean Stubtail, which was a nice way to end another spectacular day.
The Black-eye and Pale Faced Bulbul were seen at the trees above the Gate and also just below the Timpohon Gate as all trails beyond were still closed when we were there in september.

The Bornean Swiftlets were nesting on the left hand side about 2KM below the Timpohon Gate when we were there - the Swiftlets lower down at Park HQ were not the endemics we were told.

You got a couple of birds we missed but missed a few we saw - almost inevitable I think.
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