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Old Saturday 5th September 2020, 11:00   #51
Calalp
Björn Bergenholtz
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
[...]
catamenia [new entry]
Gr. καταμηνια katamēnia menstrual, menstruous < κατα kata in relation to; μην mēn, μηνος mēnos month.
• "I cannot make out Calliste catamenia Bonaparte (Rev. Mag. Zool., (2), 3, p. 139, 1851), described as "Viridis, vertice crissoque rufescentibus." No locality is indicated. Although the type is credited to the Leiden Museum, the name has never been quoted again in literature. According to G. C. W. Junge (in litt.), the specimen cannot be found in the collections at Leiden." (Hellmayr, 1936, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IX, 81) (unident.; ?syn. Tangara sp.).
[...]
Regardless of what Hellmayr wrote in 1936 (here, in foot-note), in the reference itself "(Rev. Mag. Zool., (2), 3, p.139, 1851)" [Revue et magasin de zoologie (pure et appliquée)] it's: "CALLISTE CATAMENA, Bp, ...", not catamenia (see here).

Imagine that! A typo of (the great monitor) Hellmayr himself ...


--

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 5th September 2020 at 11:10.
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Old Saturday 5th September 2020, 11:41   #52
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Björn, your word is my command. Key MS now reads,
catamena / catamene
Gr. καταμηνια katamēnia menstrual, menstruous < κατα kata in relation to; μην mēn, μηνος mēnos month.
• "I cannot make out Calliste catamenia [sic = catamena] Bonaparte (Rev. Mag. Zool., (2), 3, p. 139, 1851), described as "Viridis, vertice crissoque rufescentibus." No locality is indicated. Although the type is credited to the Leiden Museum, the name has never been quoted again in literature. According to G. C. W. Junge (in litt.), the specimen cannot be found in the collections at Leiden." (Hellmayr, 1936, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IX, 81) (unident.; ?syn. Tangara sp.) (Björn Bergenholtz in litt.).

catamenia see catamena
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Old Saturday 5th September 2020, 11:56   #53
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No need to credit me on that part, James ...

Typos are nothing but typos.

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Old Saturday 5th September 2020, 12:36   #54
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Etymology, in line with; "Loriculus catamene" SCHLEGEL, 1871 (here, in French), i.e. today's debated Sangir Hanging Parrot Loriculus (amabilis) catamene, ... and/or/alt./versus the generic Catamenia BONAPARTE 1850 (here, in Thraupidae) ... ?!?

Regarding the etymology, or etymologies, I'm all lost (as usual when it boils down to Latin and Greek). ...

/B
...

Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 5th September 2020 at 23:35. Reason: Deleted delusion. No reason to plant a false notion in anyone's head ;)
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Old Saturday 5th September 2020, 14:33   #55
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In ornithology catamena / catamene / Catamenia / catamenia all allude to the rufous or red (i.e. bloody) vent of the relevant bird.
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Old Saturday 5th September 2020, 23:38   #56
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Cyanurus [updated]
Gr. κυανος kuanos dark-blue; ουρα oura tail.
• (syn. Cyanocorax † White-throated Magpie Jay C. formosus) "817. Cyanurus, Bp. ex Sw. (Cyanocorax, p. Boie. - Calocitta hinc Psilorhinus, p. Gr.) Rostrum nigrum: cauda longissima. Am. s. As. or. 4. a. Americani. 1. PICA bullocki, Wagl. 1827. (miles, Licht. - formosa, Sw. 1827. - gubernatrix, Temm. - Psilorhinus gubernatrix, Gr.) Pl. col. 436. ex Mexico or. Vera-Cruz. ... 2. PICA colliei, Vig. (Garrulus ultramarinus, Aud. nec Bp. G. bullocki, Aud. nec Wagl. - G. burneti, errore burnetti, berneti et bennetti, J. Gr. - Psilorhinus bullocki, Gr.) Zool. Beach. Voy. t. 7. - Aud. Am. t. 96. - Quarto edit. t. 229. ex Mexico occ. California." (Bonaparte 1850); "Cyanurus (not of Swainson, 1832) Bonaparte, Consp. Gen. Av., 1, p. 380, 1850—type, by subs. desig. (Sharpe, Cat. Bds. Brit. Mus., 3, p. 88, 1877), Pica formosa Swainson." (Hellmayr, 1934, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. VII, 11).
• (syn. Cyanocorax † Plush-crested Jay C. chrysops) "Genus, CYANURUS. ... Examples. - 1. C. cristatus. 2. Stelleri. 3. sordidus, Sw. 4. Floridanus, BON. 5. coronatus, Sw. Syn. 6. cyanopogon (Pl. col. 169). 7. pileatus (Ill. 58). 8. azureus (Ill. 168) 9. formosus (Pica formosa, Sw. Syn.) 10. cristatellus (Pl. col. 193), &c. OBS. - This group is distinguished from the European and North Asiatic Jays by the upper mandible not being abruptly bent at the tip, or very distinctly notched, by the under being weaker, and by the powerful structure of the feet. The two outer toes also are almost equal. The first three species are aberrant, connecting this and the last group [Dysornithia]. The typical species are found only in the tropics of America and India" (Swainson 1832); "The genera Psilorhinus and Cissa, with Cyanocorax of South America, form a little group by themselves; and I consider that Mr. Strickland was quite justified in separating from the last the blue Jays of North America, which constitute his Cyanocitta, An. and Mag. Nat. Hist. 1845, p. 260; but as Corvus cristatus, Lin. is the type of Mr. Swainson's Cyanurus, I conceive that this must take precedence of Cyanocitta, Strickland" (Blyth 1846); "The type of the genus Cyanocitta of Strickland is Garrulus cristatus, Linn. as stated in precise terms by the founder of the genus ... Again, the type of Cyanurus, Sw., is not Garrulus cristatus ... This error was caused by Mr. G. R. Gray's [1855] unauthorized assumption that the first species in any author's list must necessarily be his type. But Swainson himself tells us that the first three species which he mentions (i.e. C. cristatus, C. stelleri, and C. sordidus) are "aberrant," and that the "typical" species are only found in the "tropics of America and India." It is obvious therefore that Cyanurus, Sw. (1831) = Cyanocorax, Boie (1826) as stated by Strickland l.s.c., and that Cyanocitta is the proper generic name for the "Blue Jays" of America" (P. Sclater & Salvin 1876); "Cyanurus Swainson, in Richardson, Faun. Bor.-Amer., 2, p. 495, Feb., 1832— no type designated. 2 ... 2 No valid type appears to have been designated for this genus. ... Though, by common consent, Cyanurus has been regarded as synonymous with Cyanocorax, it seems advisable to formally propose a genotype to set this name at rest, and we suggest as such Corvus pileatus "Ill." = Pica chrysops Vieillot." (Hellmayr, 1934, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. VII, 17).
• (syn. Calocitta † White-throated Magpie Jay C. formosa) "Genus, CYANURUS. ... Examples. - 1. C. cristatus. 2. Stelleri. 3. sordidus, Sw. 4. Floridanus, BON. 5. coronatus, Sw. Syn. 6. cyanopogon (Pl. col. 169). 7. pileatus (Ill. 58). 8. azureus (Ill. 168) 9. formosus (Pica formosa, Sw. Syn.) 10. cristatellus (Pl. col. 193), &c. " (Swainson 1832); "A list of the genera of birds, with their synonyma an indication of the typical species of each genus. [...] CYANURUS, Swains. Corvus, Licht. Pica, Wagl. Garrulus, Gray. | C. Bullockii, (Wagl.) Bonap. P. gubernatrix, Temm., PI. col. 436. P. formosa. Swains. G. Burnettii, Gray. P. Collieii, Vigors. G. ultramarinus, (Bonap.) Audub." (Gray 1840).

Under Art. 69.2.2 of ICZN, Gray's 1840 designation (of Pica bullockii Wagler 1827, not an originally included nominal species and thus not eligible to become the type, with 5 cited synonyms, one of which was the originally included nominal species Pica formosa Swainson 1827), fixed Pica formosa Swainson 1827 as the type of Cyanurus Swainson 1832 (the genuine thing, not a redefined later concept by Bonaparte "ex Swainson"). No later action (Blyth 1846, Gray 1855, Hellmayr 1934, or whatever) can be valid.
(Clements, thus presumably BOW, use Calocitta Gray 1841 for this species. Note that Cyanurus is senior to this name (which Gray introduced a year after the above designation, having by then changed his mind about the type of Cyanurus); and that it cannot be made a nomen oblitum, because it has been used after 1899 (under the assumption that cristatus was the type, but that doesn't matter -- it has been used).)

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Old Sunday 6th September 2020, 09:50   #57
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Cyanurus.
Food for thought here, Laurent, for which many thanks. Presently I am following the nomenclature in the HBW-BLI Illustrated Checklist, which subsumes Calocitta in Cyanocorax.. When, eventually, my Key is fully incorporated into Cornell's BOW, and I have been able to absorb their nomenclature, I envisage a busy time editing my 3,800 pages and, currently, 1,433,000 words.
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Old Sunday 6th September 2020, 11:08   #58
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I envisage a busy time editing my 3,800 pages and, currently, 1,433,000 words.
https://thumbs.gfycat.com/IdenticalE...restricted.gif
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Old Sunday 13th September 2020, 08:56   #59
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"Streptopelia dussumieri gutierrezi" HACHISUKA 1930

gutierrezi continuation ... (on post #20 and #26-28)

Amendment/clarification, and thereby some (minor) steps back ...

"Our guy" Colonel Dionisio Gutierrez, is not to confuse with the Tobacco researcher Mariano E. Gutierrez (as of here), a guy with the following career, picked up in the Proceedings of the fifth Annual Conference of Tobacco (experiment station personnel for 1956), Vol. 5, published by Bureau of Plant Industry, Tobacco Division, 1956 (here, my blue):
Quote:
... much to the chagrin of his Dean and Professors, rather than stay in the College of Agriculture and prepare himself for the dignified professorial position. Thus, his first job was as a Deputy Provincial Governor of Cotabato (1917-1922). Then he became Superintendent of the defunct Pikit later Sarunayan Tobacco Experiment Station in Cotabato (1922–1928). It is here where young Gutierrez started to etch his name into the history of scientific agriculture. He became interested in tobacco research particularly the, the wrapper tobacco. The Sumatra wrapper leaf that he produced in the former Pikit Tobacco Experiment Station in 1922 was of superior quality as proven by the Alhambra and Tabacalera which won for him an unsolicited commendation from former Governor-General Leonard Wood [*]. In 1931–1932, he was assigned to premier tobacco provinces as a District Agronomist of Nueva Vizcaya and Isabela, In-charge of the Cagayan Valley Tobacco Project and at the same time Superintendent of the Ilagan Tobacco Experiment Station. Subsequent positions he held were as Acting Chief, Agronomy Section (1933–1935); ...

... and onwards.
Though (as I hadn't heard of this guy earlier), the latter three links in my post #20 might be all useless, there's nothing obvious indicating that those certain three links/texts are dealing with the passing of "our guy" (Lieutenant, later Colonel) Dionisio Gutierrez. Thereby his Death remain (all) unknown ... but he seems to have been retired in 1961.

However, if they both were Governors of Cotabato, in just about the same years (one after the other), wouldn't it be somewhat unlikely that they are unrelated ...? Or is Gutierrez an extremely common name in the Philippines?

Either way, the following "Administrative Order" indicates that "our guy" Dionisio Gutierrez was still alive in 1938 (at least in February), here. He's also mentioned here, (as Lieutenant Colonel) in the same year.

Also see the Joseph Ralston Hayden Papers: 1854-1975, kept in the Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, (here), Box 42: "Reports from Dionisio Gutierrez, including material on guerrilla activities in Mindanao 1944-1945". All in line with what's written here.

Take it all for whatever it's worth. Hopefully some of it can be of use/help, in finding him (in full).

Well, I'm done on this guy.

Mr Gutierrez ... over and out! (at least on my part)

Björn

PS. In this fairly recent book from 2017 there is a Photo of what can be "our guy" (unfortunately without any date or year).

________________________________________________________________
*Not to confuse with his Son and namesake [Leonard Wood, Jr. (1892–1931)] who's commemorated in:
• the Olive-backed Sunbird subspecies (Nectarinia) Cinnyris jugularis woodi MEARNS 1909 (here),
as "Cyrtostomus jugularis woodi", a k a "Wood Yellow-breasted Warbler": "Shot by Leonard Wood, jr., for whom the species is named."
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Old Sunday 13th September 2020, 14:41   #60
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Bulletin 14: There be of them, that have left a name behind them

Anabasitta [updated]
(syn. Margarornis † Pearled Treerunner M. squamiger) Portmanteau of genera Anabates Temminck, 1820, spinetail, and Sitta Linnaeus, 1758, nuthatch; "ANABASITTA (d'Anabates et de Sitta). OIS. — G. formé par M. d'Orbigny et nous (Voy. en Am.), pour 2 esp. d'oiseaux de ce pays, et que nous avons changé en Anabazenops, comme exprimant mieux sa double affinité." (de La Fresnaye & Orbigny 1841); "Anabates squamiger ... Mais, comme d'après ses formes de pattes, de bec, de queue et d'ailes, il ne peut être placé ni dans le genre Sitta, ni dans le genre Xenops; nous avons pensé qu'il devait former le type d'un nouveau genre intermédiaire aux Xenops, aux Sitta et aux Anabates, que nous nommerons, à cause de cela, ANABASITTA ... Anabasitta squamigera, Lafr." (de La Fresnaye & d'Orbigny 1853); "Anabasitta LAFRESNAYE a , Rev. Mag. Zool., (2) 5, p. 492, Nov. 1853— type [by original designation and monotypy] Anabates squamiger LAFRESNAYE and D'ORBIGNY. ... a In Dict. Univ. Hist. Nat., I, p. 411, 1841, where it first appeared in print, Anabasitta is a nomen nudum." (Hellmayr, 1925, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IV, 170).

boersii [updated]
Eponym; said to be an officer in the service of the Dutch East India Co.; "Galbola di Boërs ... Boërs la scopri nell' anzidetta isola di Banda" (Ranzani 1821) (OD per Björn Bergenholtz) (syn. Jacamerops aurea) (see Galbuloides).

Brachyurus [correction]
(syn. Conopophaga † Black-cheeked Gnateater C. melanops) Gr. βραχυς brakhus short; ουρα ourα tail; "Denne fogel finnes tecknad uti Museo Carlsoniano, Tom. 4 och Tab. 84 under namn af Turdus triostegus. ... Jag har ansett det kunna få namn af BRACHYURUS och sin plats ibland Passeres, näst efter Turdus. Character Generis blifver då Rostrum capite brevius, rectum. Mandibula superior conico-trigona apice incurvo, longior, intra apicem utrinque excisa; inferior brevior, recta. Cauda alis (non longior) æqualis, rotundata. ... Förutan BRACHYURUS triostegus ifrån Ön Ceilon, har Brasilien i sednare tider skänkt osstvenne andra arter ... BRACHYURUS gularis. B. supra olivaceus pileo rubro; temporibus atris; subtus fuscus gula crissoque albis. ... BRACHYURUS ruber. B. supra fuscus maculis dorsalibus testaceis; subtus ferrugineis." (Thunberg 1821); "Brachyurus THUNBERG, Kongl. Vetenskaps Akad. Handl., 1821, Part 2, p. 371 (types Brachyurus gularis and B. ruber = Conopophaga m. melanops [VIEILLOT])." (Hellmayr, 1924, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. III, 25). According to the Richmond Card Index, Turdus triostegus = Pitta brachyura. Var. Brachiurus.

DENDROCOLAPTES [updated]
(Furnariidae; † Amazonian Barred Woodcreeper D. certhia) Gr. δενδροκολαπτης dendrokolaptēs woodpecker < δενδρον dendron tree; κολαπτω kolaptō to peck; "DENDROCOLAPTES. Nobis. Rostrum vel incurvum vel rectum, basi nudum. Lingua . . . Pedes ambulatorii, digito posteriore modico. Rectricum rhachis in setam producta. Pic-Grimperau, Buffon T. VII. Victus moresque prorsus pici. Major species rostro valido, mandibula superiore fornicata, subcurvata. Color fuscus. Le Picucule de Cayenne. Pl. enlum. 621. Minor species, rostro mediocri, rectissimo, acuto, dorso caudaque castaneis, capite, collo, ventreque nigris, albo-maculatis, more corvi caryocatactis. Le Talapiot de Cayenne. Pl. enlum. t. 605. Genus difficulter determinatur. Inter picum, sittam, certhiam intermedium. Apud Gmelinum in Syst. Nat. hucusque non reperi." (Hermann 1804); "GENUS 24. DENDROCOLAPTES Herrmann. (Holzhauer Germ. Pic-grimpereau Gall.) ... Species: Gracula Cayennensis, Oriolus Picus LinGmel." (Illiger 1811); "The Genus Dendrocolaptes of Illiger [1811, Prodromus Syst. Mamm. Av., p. 212] (the Picacule of the French) have, in all the species I found in South America, precisely the same manners and habits as the Pici, climbing the trees with even greater facility, although their feet are those termed ambulatorii. The type of this excellent genus is Gracula cayennensis of Linnæus. M. Viellot [sic], some years after, without taking any notice of the previous distinction given these birds by Illiger, calls their genus Dendrocopus, a name evidently borrowed from Illiger; nor is this the only plagiarism committed by an ornithologist whose intrinsic merit requires no such dubious aid to increase his fame." (Swainson 1821); "Dendrocolaptes HERMANN, Observ. Zool, p. 135, 1804— type by subs. desig. (SWAINSON, Mem. Wern. Nat. Hist. Soc., 3, p. 292, 1821) "Gracula cayennensis, of LINNAEUS" [= GMELIN] = Picus certhia BODDAERT." (Hellmayr, 1925, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IV, 259); "Dendrocolaptes Hermann, Observ. Zool., 1804, p. 135. Type, by subsequent designation, "D. Cayanensis (Gm.), Pl. enl. 621" = Picus certhia Boddaert (G. R. Gray, List Gen. Bds., 1840, p. 18).1 ... 1 Swainson's earlier designation of the same species as the type is invalid, since he credits the genus to Illiger, 1811." (Peters, 1951, VII, 31).

Dendroma [updated]
(syn. Philydor † Buff-fronted Foliage-gleaner P. rufum) Gr. δενδρον dendron tree; -δρομος -dromos -runner < τρεχω trekhō to run; "We can, from personal observation, vouch for the fact that the creepers composing the genera, Zenops, Anabates, and Dendroma, are habitual climbers .... we have seen these birds running both up and down the trunks of trees" (Swainson 1836); "DENDROMA, Sw. (fig. 282.c) Bill straight, entire, much compressed; the culmen straight, but the tip suddenly bent down and inflexed over that of the lower mandible. Wings moderate, rounded. Tail somewhat stiff, lengthened, graduated, and very obliquely pointed. Tarsus longer than the middle and the hind toes. Lateral toes unequal, the inner shortest; hind and middle toes of equal length. All the claws moderate and broad, and fully curved. The toes more or less free. D. caniceps. Braz. Birds, pl. 80." (Swainson 1837); "Dendroma SWAINSON, Classif. Birds, 2, p. 316, 1837—generic characterse, type by subs. desig., (GRAY, 1855, p. 28) Sphenura poliocephala LICHTENSTEIN = Dendrocopus rufus VIEILLOT. ... e The only species quoted, Dendroma caniceps SWAINSON (based on the unpublished plate 80 of the author's "Ornithological Drawings") is a nomen nudum." (Hellmayr, 1925, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IV, 199).

Galbuloides [updated]
(syn. Jacamerops † Great Jacamar J. aureus) Genus Galbula Brisson 1760, jacamar; Gr. -οιδης -oidēs resembling; "1er GENRE. — GALBULOIDE. GALBULOIDES. (O. Des Murs.) ... Une seule espèce, le Galbuloïde de Boërs (Galbuloides [Jacamerops] Boërsii), G. R. Gray, O. Des Murs, espèce qui ne repose que sur la seule figure d'un individu vu par Le Vaillant, et qu'il croyait provenir de l'Indostan, mais que tout indique appartenir à l'Amérique tropicale. ... Nous avons donc cru, par ces motifs, devoir donner un nom générique distinct au Jacamérops de Boërs, et c'est celui de Galbuloïde (Galbuloides)." (des Murs 1851); "Ferner ist hier noch zu erwähnen die auf einem Artefact beruhende angeblich moluccensische (!) Gattung: Gen. GALBULOIDES (!) Desmurs 1851. G. Boërsi Desmurs. Grand Jacamar Levaill. Hist. Nat. Ois. Parad. &c. II. p. 123. t. 53. — Galbula Boersii Ranzani Elem. di Zool. III. p. 197. — Jacamerops Boërsii Gray Gen. B. I. p. 84. 2. — Rchb. Handb. spec. Orn. p. 89. 183. t. 459. 3284. — Galbuloides Boersi Desmurs Enc. Hist. Nat. p. 36. — Scl. Syn. Galbul. p. 10. gen. 4. 1. —Lamproptila Boërsii Cab. Ersch & Grub. Enc. Wissensch. & Künst. LII. I. p. 310. gen. 4. 2. — Galbula Jacamerops magna "Cuv." Rchb. Handb. spec. Orn. p. 89." (Cabanis & Heine 1863); "Jacamerops aurea aurea (P. L. S. Müller) Alcedo aurea P. L. S. Müller, Natursyst., Suppl., 1776, p. 94. (Berbice, British Guiana.) Galbula Boersii Ranzani, Elem. di. Zool., 3, 1821, pt. 2, p. 197. (Banda Island; error, I designate British Guiana.)" (Peters, 1948, VI, 9); "Galbuloides des Murs, 1851, in Chenu, Encyclopédie d'Histoire Naturelle, Oiseaux, II, p. 35. Type by monotypy, Jacamerops boersii Gray = Galbula boersii Ranzani = Alcedo aurea Statius Müller." (mihi 2020).

licua [updated]
Original orthography (i.e. initial capital letter) would indicate that this is an autochthonym in South Africa for the Pearl-spotted Owlet; "31. -[Strix]- Licua Licht. Habitu (i.e. partium inter se ratione, praecipue remigum rectricumque longitudine mutua) et pictura, simillima Str. passerinae Lin. (pygmaeae Bechst.), sed major, 8-pollicaris, differt quoque rectricum fasciis 6 albis latioribus vix linearibus, sed interruptis, e macula utrinque orbiculari conflatis, terminali nulla." (Lichtenstein 1842, Verz. Samml. Säugeth. Vögel. Kaffernlande, p. 12). However, Björn Bergenholtz in litt. refers to Cole 1990, S. Afr. Journ. Afr. Lang., 10 (4), p. 349, where Lekwa is given as the Tswana name for the Vaal River (the original habitat of this owl) (subsp. Glaucidium perlatum).

selbyii [updated]
(syn. Accipiter tachiro)

Tmetotrogon [upgraded]
(syn. Temnotrogon † Hispaniolan Trogon T. roseigaster) Gr. τμητος tmētos cut, shaped by cutting < τεμνω temnō to cut; genus Trogon Brisson, 1760, trogon; "Gen. TMETOTROGON* [sic] ) Bp. 1854. — Perl-Curucu. Temnotrogon (!) Bp. 1854. 132. — T. rhodogaster Bp. ... **) Ganz wie oben Apalharpactes (!) aus Apaloderma (!) und Harpactes bildete Bonaparte sicherlich auch die Benennung Temnotrogon (!) aus Temnurus und Trogon, um die zwischen diesen beiden Gattungen gleichsam vermittelnde Uebergangs-Stellung des Perl-Curucu's anzudenten; doch glückte es ihm hier nicht ganz so wie dort, sogleich einen neuen brauchbaren Namen aus zwei alten zu fabriciren, diesen "schneidenden Trogon" in einen "geschnittenen", in Tmetotrogon von τμητος (geschnitten, gestutzt) τρωγων (Nager) verwandelt, obwohl derselbe eigentlich keinen eben viel auffallender abgestutzten Schwanz zeigt, als manche andere Formen der Familie. Auch sahen wir uns genöthigt, mit Temminck an Stelle des barbarischen vorn lateinischen und hinten griechischen roseigaster (!) Vieill. das rein griechische gleich-bedeutende rhodogaster treten zu lassen." (Cabanis & Heine 1863); "Tmetotrogon Cabanis & Heine, 1863, Museum Heineanum, IV (1), p. 166. New name for Temnotrogon Bonaparte, 1854, considered barbarous. Type by monotypy, Tmetotrogon rhodogaster Cabanis & Heine, 1863 = Trogon roseigaster Vieillot, 1817." (mihi 2020).

Urotomus [updated]
(syn. Myrmornis † Southern Wing-banded Antbird M. torquata) Gr. ουρα oura tail; τομη tomē stump < τομευω tomeuō to cut; "a third type of form, wherein the tail is nearly obsolete, and the legs (from their great length), evidently show we have reached a group of cursorial or ambulatory birds, who rarely, if ever, frequent trees. These I shall call Urotomus." (Swainson 1824); "Sub-family Myiotherina. UROTOMUS. Rostrum ut in genere Drymophila. Alæ brevissimæ. Cauda brevissima, fere inconspicua. Pedes graciles, longi; tarsorum squamis lateralibus plerumque integris." (Swainson 1827); "Urotomus SWAINSON, Zool. Journ., I, No. 3, Oct. 1824, p. 302 [nom. nud.]; idem, l. c., 3, No. 10, 1827, p. 160 [= 166] (type by subs. desig., STRICKLAND, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist., 13, 1844, p. 416, Urotomus formicivorus GMELIN = Formicarius torquatus BODDAERT)." (Hellmayr, 1924, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. III, 322).

Xenicopsoides [updated]
(syn. Anabacerthia † Scaly-throated Foliage-gleaner A. variegaticeps) Genus Xenicopsis Cabanis & Heine, 1860, foliage-gleaner; Gr. -οιδης -oidēs resembling; "Xenicopsoides subgenus nov. Characters. - Similar to Xenicopsis Cabanis, but with much less graduated and relatively shorter tail (tail less than 5/6 of wing), relatively shorter tarsus and plain under parts. (Type Anabazenops variegaticeps Sclater)" (Cory 1919); "Xenicopsoides Cory, Auk, 36, 1919, p. 273. Type, by original designation, Anabazenops variegaticeps Sclater." (Peters, 1951, VII, 127) (Hellmayr, 1925, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IV, 195, erroneously gives Anabates striaticollis Sclater as type).

XENOGLAUX [updated]
(Strigidae; † Long-whiskered Owlet X. loweryi) Gr. ξενος xenos stranger; γλαυξ glaux, γλαυκος glaukos owl; “The bird in the bag was indeed an owl but totally unlike anything any of us had ever seen. It was a tiny, bare-legged owl without ear tufts. O'Neill's immediate impression was that it was "shaped like an Otus, the size of a Glaucidium, and colored like a Lophostrix." To this day the little owl has remained as exciting to us as it was on that rainy day in northern Peru. The three known specimens, two females and a male, possess a combination of characters that prevents their placement in any currently recognized genus. For this strange little owl we propose the generic name Xenoglaux gen. nov. TYPE-SPECIES: Xenoglaux loweryi O'Neill and Graves. ... Xenoglaux loweryi sp. nov. LONG-WHISKERED OWLET ... ETYMOLOGY: The name Xenoglaux comes from the Greek words Xenos, strange or foreign, and glaux, an owl, and alludes to the peculiar expression of this tiny bird with its greatly exagerrated facial whiskers, and intense, staring, amber-orange eyes that make it a true stranger among owls. The name is masculine in gender. We take pleasure in applying the specific epithet loweryi in honor of our mentor and friend George H. Lowery, Jr., in recognition of his influence upon us and upon neotropical ornithology.” (O'Neill & Graves 1977); "Xenoglaux O'Neill & Graves, 1977, Auk, 94 (3), p. 410. Type by original designation and monotypy, Xenoglaux loweryi O'Neill & Graves." (mihi 2020).

XIPHORHYNCHUS [new sub-entry]
• (syn. Campylorhamphus † Black-billed Scythebill C. falcularius) "XIPHORHYNCHUS. Rostrum gracile, elongatum, compressissimum, falcatum, immarginatum. Bill slender, long, much compressed, falcated and entire. Type. Dend. procurvus. Temm., Pl. col.. 28. By this form, the passage is marked from Dendrocolaptes to Certhia. The species appear numerous. I possess four from Brazil, and three from Mexico." (Swainson 1827); "Xiphorhynchus (not of SWAINSON, June 1827) SWAINSON, Zool. Journ., 3, No. 11, p. 334, Sept.-Dec. 1827—type by orig. desig. Dendrocolaptes procurvus TEMMINCK [= Dendrocopus falcularius Vieillot]." (Hellmayr, 1925, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IV, 339).
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Old Sunday 13th September 2020, 16:48   #61
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That was quick James! Maybe too quick?

You might consider a tiny amendment, on (the blue part):

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
Bulletin 14: ...
[...]
licua [updated]
Original orthography (i.e. initial capital letter) would indicate that this is an autochthonym in South Africa for the Pearl-spotted Owlet; "31. -[Strix]- Licua Licht. Habitu (i.e. partium inter se ratione, praecipue remigum rectricumque longitudine mutua) et pictura, simillima Str. passerinae Lin. (pygmaeae Bechst.), sed major, 8-pollicaris, differt quoque rectricum fasciis 6 albis latioribus vix linearibus, sed interruptis, e macula utrinque orbiculari conflatis, terminali nulla." (Lichtenstein 1842, Verz. Samml. Säugeth. Vögel. Kaffernlande, p. 12). However, Björn Bergenholtz in litt. refers to Cole 1990, S. Afr. Journ. Afr. Lang., 10 (4), p. 349, where Lekwa is given as the Tswana name for the Vaal River (the original habitat of this owl) (subsp. Glaucidium perlatum).
[...]
Simply as I did not refer " ... to Cole 1990, S. Afr. Journ. Afr. Lang., 10 (4) p. 349", but to "Cole, D. T. (1991) Old Tswana and New Latin. Botswana Notes and Records, Volume 23: pp. 175–191.". Rookmaaker (2017) on the other hand, who didn't list licua, was the one who had read Cole's paper (from 1990).

The former paper I haven't seen, and I have no clue what it tells us (even if it, most likely, could be, or was, telling us exactly the same)

Fair is fair (or should be).

Björn
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Old Sunday 13th September 2020, 18:41   #62
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Bjorn,
Sorry, but I saw "Old Tswana and new Latin" and assumed it referred to the 1990 paper, of which I have a copy. In fact, the Botswana Notes paper 1991 is a shortened version of the original, and does not contain some of the finer linguistic details of the 1990 paper. I would rather refer to the original, larger, more detailed paper (the reference to licua is much the same, and doesn't alter our etymology). If it please you,I can alter "refers" to "alludes."
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Old Sunday 13th September 2020, 23:49   #63
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James, I assume "alludes" would be a more appropriate choice of words, but ... if you have (and had) the longer, more detailed paper (from 1990), I don't really understand why you have to refer to me at all. Refer to Cole himself. He was the one who came up with the (alleged) explanation. If you find it reliable, of course. Only pointing out a possible (highly likely) explanation, isn't such a big deal. We've all missed things, now and then.


Though, one more remark (I'm apparently in a picky mood today); I'm not all convinced that the first part of the entry is fully correct, or duly applicable (at least not in very case, by Lichtenstein):
Quote:
licua [updated]
Original orthography (i.e. initial capital letter) would indicate that this is an autochthonym in South Africa ...
Most of the names listed by Lichtenstein (in this certain Verzeichniss), written with initial capital letters (of species), sure looks like autochthonyms (except for all those obvious Eponyms, of course), but note that he also, for example/s, lists: (no.49) "Anthus Chloris" and/or (No.238) "Crex Chloropus", both written/typed with an "initial capital letter".

I sure would love to see (or hear) a local African person yell out those names, and point at either one of those Birds!

Take all of this post for whatever it's worth. The latter was just an observation. As I see it, Lichtenstein doesn't seem to have been very consistent, in how he used those inital capital, versus lower-case, letter/s.

That's it, enough of nitpicking for today ...


Stay safe!

Björn

PS. Also compare with Lichtenstein's listed Mammals, on the preceding pages,
for example/s; "Otocyon Caffer", "Antilope Pygarga", "Mus Pumilio", etc., etc.

___________________________________________
[For all Non-James readers, who doesn't understand this discussion,
it started in thread HBWAlive Key; mission ...; here, post #562 (-564)]

--

Last edited by Calalp : Monday 14th September 2020 at 09:42. Reason: Inserted link to Verzeichniss
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Old Monday 14th September 2020, 10:09   #64
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Björn,
I agree that Lichtenstein was not wholly consistent in his treatment of specific epithets. However, both Chloris, for Greenfinch or anything greenish, and Chloropus, for Moorhen, were used as substantive or vernacular names in ornithology by Gessner 1555, and Aldrovandus 1599 (for Chloris), and Linnaeus 1758 (Chloropus), and were so treated by Lichtenstein. Doubtless the Tswana and Ndebele had their own (unrecorded) names for the pipit and the Moorhen.
All harmony.
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Old Monday 14th September 2020, 11:53   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
DENDROCOLAPTES
[...]
"Dendrocolaptes HERMANN, Observ. Zool, p. 135, 1804— type by subs. desig. (SWAINSON, Mem. Wern. Nat. Hist. Soc., 3, p. 292, 1821) "Gracula cayennensis, of LINNAEUS" [= GMELIN] = Picus certhia BODDAERT." (Hellmayr, 1925, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. IV, 259);
"Dendrocolaptes Hermann, Observ. Zool., 1804, p. 135. Type, by subsequent designation, "D. Cayanensis (Gm.), Pl. enl. 621" = Picus certhia Boddaert (G. R. Gray, List Gen. Bds., 1840, p. 18).1 ... 1 Swainson's earlier designation of the same species as the type is invalid, since he credits the genus to Illiger, 1811." (Peters, 1951, VII, 31).
Peters may have been correct in 1951, but he is wrong (and Hellmayr is right) under the current rules. The valid designation is unquestionably that of Swainson. The current Code says:
Quote:
67.7. Status of incorrect citations. If, in fixing the type species for a nominal genus or subgenus, an author wrongly attributes the name of the type species, or of the genus or subgenus, to an author or date other than that denoting its first establishment, or cites wrongly the first express inclusion of nominal species in that genus or subgenus, he or she is nevertheless to be considered, if the nominal species was otherwise eligible, to have validly fixed the type species. For previous misidentifications deliberately employed when fixing a type species, see Articles 11.10 and 67.13.

Example. Aus Dupont, 1790, established without a type species, is best known from the work of a later author, Smith (1810). If subsequently Bus xus is designated as the type species of "Aus Smith, 1810", that designation is to be accepted as a designation of the type species for Aus Dupont, 1790, providing Bus xus was eligible for designation as type species of the latter. Errors in attributing the authorship or date of Bus xus would also be immaterial.
I.e., a type designation cannot be rejected on the mere account that a name in the designation was misattributed. Illiger explicitly attributed Dendrocolaptes to Hermann, thus there is no question that the name he used was Hermann's.
(Illiger's publication actually played a critical role in the fixation of a type for Dendrocolaptes, because Illiger was the first author to include nominal species in Hermann's name, which determined which nominal species were eligible to become the type. Hermann cited his species using French vernaculars only, which are not eligible to become the type.)
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Old Monday 14th September 2020, 12:03   #66
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Brachyurus [correction]
(syn. Conopophaga † Black-cheeked Gnateater C. melanops) Gr. βραχυς brakhus short; ουρα ourα tail; "Denne fogel finnes tecknad uti Museo Carlsoniano, Tom. 4 och Tab. 84 under namn af Turdus triostegus. ... Jag har ansett det kunna få namn af BRACHYURUS och sin plats ibland Passeres, näst efter Turdus. Character Generis blifver då Rostrum capite brevius, rectum. Mandibula superior conico-trigona apice incurvo, longior, intra apicem utrinque excisa; inferior brevior, recta. Cauda alis (non longior) æqualis, rotundata. ... Förutan BRACHYURUS triostegus ifrån Ön Ceilon, har Brasilien i sednare tider skänkt osstvenne andra arter ... BRACHYURUS gularis. B. supra olivaceus pileo rubro; temporibus atris; subtus fuscus gula crissoque albis. ... BRACHYURUS ruber. B. supra fuscus maculis dorsalibus testaceis; subtus ferrugineis." (Thunberg 1821); "Brachyurus THUNBERG, Kongl. Vetenskaps Akad. Handl., 1821, Part 2, p. 371 (types Brachyurus gularis and B. ruber = Conopophaga m. melanops [VIEILLOT])." (Hellmayr, 1924, Cat. Birds Americas, Pt. III, 25). According to the Richmond Card Index, Turdus triostegus = Pitta brachyura. Var. Brachiurus.
I do not understand this.

There are several nineteenth-century designations for this name, and they all make triostegus the type (either directly, or via a designation of Pitta brachyura [not an originally included nominal species], with the originally included nominal species triostegus cited in the synonymy of brachyura, which fixes triostegus as the type under Art. 69.2.2).
Gray 1840 - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/13668920
Gray 1841 - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/14050266
Sclater 1888 - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/8327775 + https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/8327785
Elliot 1895 - https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40196103 + https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40196167
Gray mis-dated the name, thinking it was much older than it actually is, but see Art. 67.7 in my last post. The name was correctly dated by Sclater and Elliot.

Besides, Hellmayr's statement above could in fact never be a valid type designation at all, because he designated simultanously as the "types" (plural!) two originally included nominal species. Even if these are now treated as taxonomically synonymous, this treatment is subjective and, nomenclaturally, these two nominal species are and remain entirely distinct entities (independent descriptions, different type specimens -- the description of gularis Thunberg is obviously that of a male, that of ruber Thunberg on a female): there is no way that they could both be the type of a genus-group name simultaneously.
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Old Monday 14th September 2020, 13:18   #67
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Laurent, many thanks for elucidating Brachyurus. Originally I had doubts about the synonymy with Conopophaga, but followed Hellmayr blindly - so much to do, so little time. The Key MS entry has been corrected, duly acknowledged.
PS Could Corvus brachyurus be the type by Linnaean tautonymy?

Last edited by James Jobling : Monday 14th September 2020 at 13:21. Reason: PS
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Old Monday 14th September 2020, 14:50   #68
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Quote:
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PS Could Corvus brachyurus be the type by Linnaean tautonymy?
Tautonymy occurs in two flavors in the Code.
- Absolute tautonymy occurs when a newly proposed genus-group name is identical to an originally included available species-group name. The species-group name can either be a name used as valid for one of the taxonomic species included in the new genus in the OD, or cited as a synonym of one such name in the OD. When this is the case, the nominal species denoted by the name which is identical to the genus-group name is the type.
- Linnaean tautonymy occurs when a newly proposed genus-group name is identical to a one-word pre-Linnaean species name, which is cited from a pre-1758 source in the synonymy of one (and only one) originally-included available species-group name. When this is the case, the nominal species denoted by the available name which has this one-word pre-Linnaean name in its synonymy is the type.

Absolute tautonymy has precedence over Linnaean tautonymy. (Original designation and monotypy, the other two mechanisms of original type fixation, have precedence over both.) As currently defined, both types of tautonymy operate exclusively based on the content of the OD -- nothing not cited in the OD should enter consideration. (Not even in the case of a genus-group name was introduced without originally included species, and several nominal species included in an immediately subsequent work, one of which would have been the type by absolute/Linnaean tautonymy if an identical inclusion had been present in the OD. There is no 'subsequent tautonymy' in the Code; a subsequent designation is always needed in such cases.)

Corvus brachyurus Linnaeus 1758 is an available species-group name. It could in principle be the type by absolute tautonymy of a genus-group name 'Brachyurus' (introduced without a type designation and with more than one included taxonomic species denoted by an available name), but this would require that it be cited as being included in the genus in the OD. This name was not cited in the OD of Brachyurus Thunberg so far as I can see. (It could not possibly be the type by Linnaean tautonymy of a genus-group name 'Brachyurus', because, even if the conditions were fulfilled [a one-word name 'Brachyurus' cited in its synonymy from a pre-1758 source], it would also be the type determined by absolute tautonymy and, short of a fixation by original designation or monotypy, this is the fixation that would prevail.)

Linnaean tautonymy is quite rare outside of the very early binominal works (which cited pre-1758 works extensively.)

Last edited by l_raty : Monday 14th September 2020 at 16:42.
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Old Monday 14th September 2020, 15:28   #69
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As soon as my PS was posted I knew the answer was no to any sort of tautonymy! The heat must be getting to me - lead me to a quiet, cool room with a couple of bottles of Cloudy Bay.
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Old Saturday 26th September 2020, 23:57   #70
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Bulletin 15: The glory and the nothing of a name.
Cornell are progressing the development of the Key, working on a solution to bring the taxonomy out in front of the subscription service (i.e. so that it is accessible to all), and are hoping to start building the stand-alone service on BOW in late October.

Agyrtria [updated]
(syn. Polytmus † White-tailed Goldenthroat P. guainumbi thaumantias) Gr. αγυρτρια agurtria collector, gatherer < αγειρω ageirō to gather (cf. Gr. myth. Agyrtes, a piper or a man who killed his father); "Agyrtria brevirostris (Orn. — LESS. 1829.) RCHB. — Guiana, Jal. Orizaba. *—— versicolor (Tr. — OLFERS 1835?) RCHB. — Brasil. * —— Thaumantias (Tr. — L. GM. 1766.) RCHB. — Guiana. * —— leucogastra (Tr. — er L. GM. 1766.) RCHB. — Caj. Bras. N.-Gran. * —— Milleri (Tr. — LODD. 1847.) RCHB. — Bras. Rio Negro. * —— Thalia (Tr. — GOULD Mus. SAUCEROTTE) RCHB. — patria? — viridipallens (Tr. — BOURC. 1846.) — Guatemala, Coban." (Reichenbach 1854); "Agyrtria Reichenbach, 1854, Journ. für Ornith., I, Extraheft, Aufzählung der Colibris, p. 10. Type, by subsequent designation (G. Gray, 1855, Cat. Genera Subgenera Birds Brit. Mus., p. 139 (Appendix)), Trochilus thaumatias, Linn." (mihi 2020).
Var. Argytira, Argyrtria.

Amazilis [upgraded]
(syn. Amazilia † Amazilia Hummingbird A. amazilia) Variant of genus Amazilia Lesson, 1843, hummingbird; "364. AMAZILIS, Less. 1832. Amazilia, Reichenb. 1849. Amazilius, Pr. B. 1849. (Ornismya Amazilis, Less.)" (G. Gray 1855); "Amazilis G. Gray, 1855, Cat. Genera Subgenera Birds Brit. Mus., p. 23. Type, by original designation, Ornismya amazilis Lesson = Orthorhynchus amazilia Lesson and Garnot." (mihi 2020).

Amazilius [updated]
(syn. Amazilia † Amazilia Hummingbird A. amazilia) Variant of genus Amazilia Lesson, 1843, hummingbird; "*180. Amazilius, Bp. (Polytmus, p. Gr.) America m. 13. 1. ORNISMYA AMAZILI, Less. (latirostris, Sw.) Voy. Coq. t. 31. 1. - Ois.-Mouch. t. 12. 13. ex Peru. 2. ORNISMYA arsinoe, Less. Ois.-Mouch. Suppl. t. 28. 29. ex Mexico. 3. ORNISMYA dumerili, Less. Ois.-Mouch. Suppl. t. 36. 4. TROCHILUS viridissimus, Gm? (viridicaudus, Saucer. Ornismya viridis, Less.) Trochil. t. 33. ex Brasil? 5. TROCHILUS corallirostris, B. Ann. Sc. Lyon, 1846. ex Guatimala. *6. TROCHILUS erythrorhynchus, Bp. Mus. Bonap. *7. TROCHILUS haematorhynchus, Bp. Mus. Bonap. 8. TROCHILUS norrissii, Bourc. Pr. Zool. Soc. 1847. p. 47. ex Peru. Guayaquil. 9. TROCHILUS flavescens, Loddig. (Ornismya paradisea, Boiss. 1840.) Pr. Zool. Soc. 1832. Species abnormis! 10. TROCHILUS riefferi, Bourc. Rev. Zool. 1843. p. 103. ex N. Granada. 11. TROCHILUS aglaiae, Bourc. Ann. Sc. Lyon. 1846. Patria ignota. 12. TROCHILUS sophiae, Bourc. Ann. Sc. Lyon, 1846. ex S.ta Fe de Bogota. 13. TROCHILUS edward, Delattre, Rev. Zool. 1846. p. 308. ex Isthm. Panama." (Bonaparte 1850); "Amazilius Bonaparte, 1850, Conspectus Generum Avium, I (1), p. 77. Type, by subsequent designation (G. Gray, 1855, Cat. Genera Subgenera Birds Brit. Mus., p. 23), Ornismya amazilis Lesson = Orthorhynchus amazilia Lesson and Garnot." (mihi 2020).
Var. Amaxilius.

ASPHALTOGLAUX
(‡ Strigidae; † Cécile's Owl A. ceciliae) Gr. ασφαλτος asphaltos asphalt, pitch; γλαυξ glaux owl; "Genus Asphaltoglaux nov. Type species: Asphaltoglaux cecileae sp. nov., monotypic ... Etymology: Form [sic] Greek asphalto, asphalt; glaux, owl; in reference to deposits, in which it has been found. Diagnosis. — Asphaltoglaux resembles Aegolius, and differs from the similar-sized Glaucidium, in characters of the tarso-metatarsus listed above that distinguish Aegolius from Glaucidium. ... Type locality: Rancho La Brea asphalt deposits; upper Pleistocene." (Campbell & Bochenski 2012) (OD per Fred Ruhe); "Asphaltoglaux Campbell and Bochenski, 2012, Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58 (4), p. 717. Type, by original designation and monotypy, Asphaltoglaux cecileae K. E. Campbell, Jr. and Z. M. Bochenski, 2012." (mihi 2020).

ceciliae [addition]
• Prof. Cécile Mourer-Chauviré (b. 1939) French palaeontologist (‡ Asphaltoglaux).

CYNANTHUS [work on sub-entries in progress; thoughts/guidance appreciated]
(Trochilidae; † Broad-billed Hummingbird C. latirostris) Gr. κυανος kuanos dark-blue; ανθος anthos blossom, flower (cf. "Cynanthus (!) Sws. ... Denn erstens hiesse das von κυων (Hund) und ανθος (Blume) gebildete Wort wörtlich übersetzt eine "Hundsblume" und wäre also wohl füglicher der Botanik zu überweisen" (Heine 1863));"G. CYNANTHUS. Swains. in Zool. Journ. No. 10. 96. Cynanthus latirostris. Green, beneath bluish; chin and throat sapphire blue ... 97. Cynanthus bifurcatus. ... 98. Cynanthus minimus. ... 99. Cynanthus Lucifer." (Swainson 1827 (June)); "Cynanthus Swainson, Philos. Mag. (n.s.), 1, June, 1827, p. 441. (Not Cynanthus Swainson, Zool. Journ., 3, Aug.-Nov., 1827, p. 357.) Type, by subsequent designation, Cynanthus latirostris Swainson. (Stone, Auk, 24, 1907, p. 192)." (Peters, 1945, V, 42).
Var. Cyananthus.
Synon. Circe, Cyanolampis, Iache, Phaeoptila.
• (syn. † ) "CYNANTHUS. Rostrum rectum, vel sub-arcuatum. Cauda longissima, forficata. Types. 1. T. colubris, L. 2. macrourus, L. 3. platurus, Sh. 4. bifurcatus, Sw. ined. 5. O. M. à queue singulaire. Temm., Pl. col. 18. f. 2. Bill straight or very slightly curved. Tail very long, forked." (Swainson 1827 (Nov.), Zool. Journal, III, 357). I have yet to find a type fixation for this name (but see next sub-entry).
• (syn. † ) "Cynanthus. Rostro recto vel subarquato, caude longissime forficata. Arten: T. colubris L., T. macrourus, bifurcus Swains. O. M. à queue singulière. col. 182." (Boie 1831, Isis von Oken, col. 547). Salvin 1892, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., XVI, 398, gives Trochilus colubris Linnaeus as type of this name!
• (syn. † ) "CYNANTHUS, Sw. Bill cylindrical, more or less curved. Tail forked. C. forficatus. Auct." (Swainson 1837, Classif. Birds, II, 330). Salvin 1892, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus., XVI, 136, gives Cyanolesbia gorgo = Trochilus kingi Lesson as type of this name.

Erythronota [updated]
(syn. Amazilia † Copper-rumped Hummingbird A. tobaci erythronotos) Gr. ερυθρος eruthros red; -νωτος -nōtos -backed < νωτον nōton back (cf. specific name Ornismya erythronotos Lesson, 1829); "ERYTHRONOTA ANTIQUA. Erythronote. Ornismya erythronota, Less. Hist. Nat. des Ois.-Mou., p. 181, pl. 61. ... ARE we to regard the several birds generally known under the name of Erythronotes as one or as many species? ... Forehead yellowish shining green; crown and nape, back, wing- and tail-coverts coppery red ... ERYTHRONOTA FELICIÆ. Felicia's Erythronote. Ornismya Feliciæ, Less. in Rev. Zool. 1840, p. 72. ... ERYTHRONOTA EDWARDI. Wilson's Erythronote. Trochilus Edward, De Latt. et Bourc. Rev. Zool. 1846, p. 308. ... ERYTHRONOTA NIVEIVENTRIS, Gould. White-breasted Erythronote. Trochilus (— ?) niveoventer, Gould in Proc. of Zool. Soc., part xviii. p. 164. ... ERYTHRONOTA? ELEGANS, Gould. Elegant Erythronote. Erythronota? elegans, Gould in Proc. of Zool. Soc., part xxviii. p. 307. ... ERYTHRONOTA SAUCEROTTEI. Saucerotte's Erythronote. Trochilus Saucerottei, Bourc. et Delatt. Rev. Zool., 1846, p. 311. ... ERYTHRONOTA SOPHIÆ. Sophia's Erythronote. Trochilus Sophiæ, Bourc. Ann. Soc. Sci. Phys. et Nat. Lyon, 1846, p. 318." (Gould 1861); "Erythronota Gould, 1861, Monog. Trochilidae, V, pl. 316 and text. Type, by tautonymy and subsequent designation (Elliot, 1879, Smithsonian Contrib. Knowledge, 317, Classif. Synop. Trochilidae, p. 216), Ornismya erythronotos Lesson." (mihi 2020).
Var. Eryithronota.

Hemistilbon [updated]
(syn. Amazilia † A. ocai = A. cyanocephala x A. beryllina hybrid) Gr. ἡμι- hēmi- half-, small < ἡμισυς hēmisus half; στιλβων stilbōn, στιλβοντος stilbontos the planet Mercury, the glittering one < στιλβω stilbō to glitter; "Nearly allied to Cyanomyia is the Genus HEMISTILBON, Gould. (‘Hμι-, semi, et στιλβων, micans.) ... Although I have placed this genus next to Cyanomyia, I consider that it has some relationship to the Amaziliæ. 319. HEMISTILBON OCAI, Gould. ... 320. HEMISTILBON NORRISI" (Gould 1861); "Hemistilbon Gould, 1861, Introd. Trochilidae, p. 149. Type, by subsequent designation (Elliot, 1879, Smithsonian Contrib. Knowledge, 317, Classif. Synop. Trochilidae, p. 216), Amazilia ocai Gould." (mihi 2020).

kurochkini [updated]
(‡Glaucidium).

lessoni [updated]
(syn. Amazilia amazilia)

Leucodora [updated]
(syn. Amazilia † Amazilia Hummingbird A. amazilia dumerilii) Gr. λευκος leukos white; δορα dora skin; "Genre LEUCODORA, LEUCODORE ... Les Leucodores se distinguent de tous les autres oiseaux de ce rameau par leur ventre au moins en grande partie blanc. ... 1. LEUCODORA NORRISI, BOURCIER. ... Trochilus Norrisii (LODDIGES), BOURCIER, Proc. Zool. Soc. part. XV (1847) p. 47. ... 2. LEUCODORA EDWARDI, DELATTRE ET BOURCIER. ... Trochilus Edwardi, DELATTRE et BOURCIER, Rev. Zool. (1846), p. 308. ... 3. LEUCODORA NIVEIVENTRIS, GOULD ... Trochilus — ? niveiventer, GOULD, Proc. Zool. Soc. part. XVIII (1850), p. 164." (Mulsant & E. Verreaux 1874); "LES LEUCOLIAIRES ... AMIZILIATES ... Genre Leucodora, MULSANT. ... (Sous-genre Leucodora.) Edwardi, DELATTRE et BOURCIER. - Panama, Costa-Rica, Veragua. niveiventris, GOULD. - Veragua, Panama" (Mulsant 1876); "Leucodora Mulsant and E. Verreaux, 1874, Hist. Nat. Oiseaux-Mouches, I, p. 309. Type, by subsequent designation (Elliot, 1879, Smithsonian Contrib. Knowledge, 317, Classif. Synop. Trochilidae, p. 201), Trochilus norrisii Bourcier = Ornismya dumerilii Lesson." (mihi 2020).

martae [new entry]
"The species is dedicated to Marta Arzarello, of Ferrara University, who gives me unique emotions in my life and everyday enthusiasm in my work." (Pavia 2007) (‡Aegolius).

moresbyae / moresbyensis [updated]
Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Beehler & Pratt, 2016, Birds New Guinea, pp. 515-516, chose not to recognise moresbyae, but indicated that, if the name were to be resurrected, its proper form should be moresbyensis, to reflect the toponym rather than the original eponymic termination (syn. Lonchura leucosticta).

Pinarolaema [updated]
(syn. Colibri † Sparkling Violet-ear C. coruscans) Gr. πιναρος pinaros dirty; λαιμος laimos throat; "PINAROLÆMA *, gen. nov. The general appearance of this bird reminds one of Lampornis; but it has an extremely long wing. In the latter respect it resembles Oreotrochilus; but it differs from this genus in its strongly curved and lengthened bill and in its very broad tail-feathers, while its extremely small feet seem peculiar to the genus. Pinarolæma Buckleyi, sp. n. ... Hab. Misqui, Bolivia, 10,000 feet. * πιναρος, sordidus; λαιμος, guttur" (Gould 1880); "Pinarolaema Gould, 1880, Annals Mag. Nat. Hist, ser. 5, V, no. 30, p. 489. Type, by monotypy, Pinarolaema buckleyi Gould = melanistic form of Trochilus coruscans Gould." (mihi 2020).

Pyrrhophaena [updated]
(syn. Amazilia † Amazilia Hummingbird A. amazilia) Gr. πυρρος purrhos flame-coloured, red < πυρ pur, πυρος puros fire; φαινω phainō to shine forth, to be conspicuous; "Gen. PYRRHOPHAENA **) Nob. — Amazilis (!) Less. 1829. Amizilis (!) Gray 1840. Lampornis Tsch. 1844 (nec Sws. 1827). Amazilia (!) Rchb. 1849. Amazilius (!) Bp. 1849. Amazillia (!) Scl. & Salvin 1859. 72. 1. P. Amazilia Nob. ... 73. 2. P. leucophaea Nob. ... 74. 3. P. Riefferi Nob. ... 75. 4. P. Dubusi Nob. ... 76. 5. P. beryllina Nob. ... **) Von πυῥῥος (röthlich) und φαινω (leuchten, glanzen). — Wir stellen u. a. noch hierher: 6. P. corallirostris. ... 7. P. Dumerili. ... 8. P. suavis nov. sp. ... 9. P. cerviniventris. ... 10. P. Norrisi. ... 11. P. Ocai." (Cabanis & Heine 1860); "Pyrrhophaena Cabanis and Heine, 1860, Museum Heineanum, III, p. 35. New name for "Amazilis (!) Lesson" and its variant spellings, considered barbarous; type Orthorhynchus amazilia Lesson and Garnot, 1827." (mihi 2020).

Saturia [updated]
(hybrid; Eriocnemis x Helianthea † Ornysmia isaacsonii) Saturia, a plebeian family of equestrian rank in ancient Rome (cf. L. saturior more rich < comp. satur, satura abundant < satis enough); "Genre Saturia, MULSANT. Isaacsoni, PAZUDAKI [sic]. — Nouvelle-Grénade." (Mulsant 1876).; "Saturia Mulsant, 1876, Annales Soc. Linn. Lyon, nouv. sér., XXII (1875), p. 217. Type, by monotypy, Ornysmia isaacsoni Parzudaki." (mihi 2020). Var. Satruia.

selimbauensis [correction: originally listed as selimbaue]
Selimbau, Kalimantan Barut / Borneo, Indonesia.

Uranomitra [updated]
(syn. Amazilia † Violet-crowned Hummingbird A. violiceps ellioti) Gr. ουρανος ouranos heaven, sky; μιτρα mitra diadem, head-band; "*Agyrtria ... *β. Uranomitra Franciae (Tr. — BOURC. MULS. 1846.) RCHB. — St. Fé de Bog. —— quadricolor (Tr. — VIEILL. 1818) SCHB. — Mexico. —— cyanicollis (Tr. — GOULD 1853?) RCHB. ? —— cyanocephala (Tr. — us MOLINA 1786.)? — Chili." (Reichenbach 1853); "Uranomitra Reichenbach, 1854, Journ. für Ornith., I, Extraheft, Aufzählung der Colibris, p. 10. Type, by subsequent designation (G. Gray, 1855, Cat. Genera Subgenera Birds Brit. Mus., p. 139 (Appendix)), Trochilus quadricolor, Vieillot = Amazilia quadricolor auct. = Uranomitra ellioti von Berlepsch. For readers who dispute the identity of Amazilia quadricolor (named twice by Vieillot), Elliot, 1879, Smithsonian Contrib. Knowledge, 317, Classif. Synop. Trochilidae, p. 195, gives Trochilus franciae Bourcier and Mulsant, as the type of Uranomitra." (mihi 2020).
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Old Sunday 27th September 2020, 01:35   #71
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Bulletin 15: The glory and the nothing of a name.
Cornell are progressing the development of the Key, working on a solution to bring the taxonomy out in front of the subscription service (i.e. so that it is accessible to all), and are hoping to start building the stand-alone service on BOW in late October.


ASPHALTOGLAUX
(‡ Strigidae; † Cécile's Owl A. ceciliae) Gr. ασφαλτος asphaltos asphalt, pitch; γλαυξ glaux owl; "Genus Asphaltoglaux nov. Type species: Asphaltoglaux cecileae sp. nov., monotypic ... Etymology: Form [sic] Greek asphalto, asphalt; glaux, owl; in reference to deposits, in which it has been found. Diagnosis. — Asphaltoglaux resembles Aegolius, and differs from the similar-sized Glaucidium, in characters of the tarso-metatarsus listed above that distinguish Aegolius from Glaucidium. ... Type locality: Rancho La Brea asphalt deposits; upper Pleistocene." (Campbell & Bochenski 2012) (OD per Fred Ruhe); "Asphaltoglaux Campbell and Bochenski, 2012, Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58 (4), p. 717. Type, by original designation and monotypy, Asphaltoglaux cecileae K. E. Campbell, Jr. and Z. M. Bochenski, 2012." (mihi 2020).

ceciliae [addition]
• Prof. Cécile Mourer-Chauviré (b. 1939) French palaeontologist (‡ Asphaltoglaux).

Z. M. Bochenski: Bocheński is with a "ń", not a n and make it Zbigniew M. Bocheński born in Poland, I do not know when, his father was Zygmunt Bocheński (25/7/1935-28/11/2009) also a famous paleornithologist.

Cécile Mourer-Chauviré was born on the 5th of November 1939 and she still lives. She was the "founding mother" of the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution (SAPE) and was its first secretary which she did for 14 year before Gerald Mayr took it over. He was succeeded by Vanesa De Pietri. Some years ago Cécile Mourer-Chauviré retired, and she doesn't like that.
She made many contributions to paleorntithology from 1975 onwards. I had the good fortune to correspond with her a few times and can say she is a very nice lady!

Fred

Last edited by Fred Ruhe : Sunday 27th September 2020 at 02:07.
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Old Sunday 27th September 2020, 07:51   #72
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Bulletin 15: The glory and the nothing of a name.
Cornell are progressing the development of the Key, working on a solution to bring the taxonomy out in front of the subscription service (i.e. so that it is accessible to all), ...

[...]
Good news!

Well negotiated.
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Old Sunday 27th September 2020, 08:52   #73
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Cornell are progressing the development of the Key, working on a solution to bring the taxonomy out in front of the subscription service
I agree with Björn. I hope my incessant whining helped in some small way. Lovely comments Mr. Ruhe.
I have not found too many publications of OLFERS about birds from his time in Brasil?
He is the author of Lanius inquisitor in MS:
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/70/mode/1up .
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Old Sunday 27th September 2020, 17:59   #74
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[b]Bulletin 15: The glory and the nothing of a name.
martae [new entry]
"The species is dedicated to Marta Arzarello, of Ferrara University, who gives me unique emotions in my life and everyday enthusiasm in my work." (Pavia 2007) (‡Aegolius).
The paper was first on line in 2007. But the paper version was only published in 2008, so I think it must be "(Pavia, 2008)"

But let Laurent be the Judge!

Fred.
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Old Sunday 27th September 2020, 21:34   #75
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Cécile Mourer-Chauviré was born on the 5th of November 1939 and she still lives. She was the "founding mother" of the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution (SAPE) and was its first secretary which she did for 14 year before Gerald Mayr took it over. He was succeeded by Vanesa De Pietri. Some years ago Cécile Mourer-Chauviré retired, and she doesn't like that.
She made many contributions to paleorntithology from 1975 onwards. I had the good fortune to correspond with her a few times and can say she is a very nice lady!

Fred
To illustrate how important Cécile Mourer-Chauviré was and is, here is a paper by Ursula Göhlich, 2013.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf 01_Tribute.pdf (5.44 MB, 7 views)

Last edited by Fred Ruhe : Sunday 27th September 2020 at 23:31.
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