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Zeiss SF 10x42 - Are they really that steady?

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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 15:50   #1
Jack Speer
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Zeiss SF 10x42 - Are they really that steady?

Hi all,

The main reason I've gone my Swarovski 8.5x42 is because I found the shakes a bit unmanageable in other 10x binoculars I've used. I saw this advertisement with Simon King (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGINwVavN_w) who basically says he usually uses 7x or 8x, but went with the 10x SF because of how much easier they are to hold.

I'd like to get experiences from other 10x SF users. Do you find them as steady as your 8x binoculars? Or is this just marketing?


Jack
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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 16:21   #2
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Jack,

I can hold the SF 10x42 steady, and I heard several other users saying the same. I also own several other 10x alphas (FLs and SVs) and dare to say that the SF 10x are the easiest to hold steady.

Peter

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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 16:32   #3
arran
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Jack,

I can hold the SF 10x42 steady, and I heard several other users saying the same. I also own several other 10x alphas (FLs and SVs) and dare to say that the SF 10x are the easiest to hold steady.

Peter
Fully agree!
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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 16:44   #4
james holdsworth
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Wider FOV will make it, seemingly, easier to hold steady.
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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 17:15   #5
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I absolutley agree with Peter. For me the SF 10x is the steadiest I have tried.

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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 18:06   #6
Steve O4B
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The SF 10x42 is the easiest 10x42 to hold steady, but the real trick is how you hold the binoculars in the first place. With proper technique, anyone without a tremor or extremely little strength should be able to hold a 10x42 steady.


Most people tend to hold binoculars with only their thumbs underneath the barrels. If you let go with your fingers on top of the barrels, the binocular will start to fall. Instead, cock your wrists and rest the barrels on the heel of your thumb and the heel of your palm. This creates a platform instead of a seesaw. You can let go with your fingers and the binocular will not go anywhere. This also has the effect of bringing your elbows in against your sides, creating additional points of support. It may feel strange when you first try this, but I guarantee it will improve your steadiness.
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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 18:44   #7
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Wider FOV will make it, seemingly, easier to hold steady.
James:

I know what you mean and you are partly right. However imo the excellent ergonomics of the SF 42mm is the main contributing factor to a steadier hold.

Peter
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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 19:15   #8
james holdsworth
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James:

I know what you mean and you are partly right. However imo the excellent ergonomics of the SF 42mm is the main contributing factor to a steadier hold.

Peter
Oh, I agree, but having a big field reduces the shake effect, compared to looking down a tube where every breath makes things jump....
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Old Thursday 16th August 2018, 23:12   #9
Jack Speer
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Thank you all for the input. I may pick one up in the future if a good deal comes up.


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Old Friday 17th August 2018, 15:24   #10
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I can't say if this 10X will be as steady as a 8X bino but for sure the 8X42 sf for me is steadier than any other 8X42 i have tried !
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Old Friday 17th August 2018, 19:34   #11
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Sf

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Speer View Post
Thank you all for the input. I may pick one up in the future if a good deal comes up.


Jack
Jack,

Get one used, one sold recently, an 8X42 for just under $1700, that is about what they (both 8and 10X )are really worth, if mint IMO. Do not pay retail.

Andy W.
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Old Saturday 18th August 2018, 15:40   #12
Jack Speer
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Jack,

Get one used, one sold recently, an 8X42 for just under $1700, that is about what they (both 8and 10X )are really worth, if mint IMO. Do not pay retail.

Andy W.

Thanks Andy. The retail price on these really is high, even for binoculars.


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Old Saturday 18th August 2018, 16:35   #13
Chosun Juan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Speer View Post
Hi all,

The main reason I've gone my Swarovski 8.5x42 is because I found the shakes a bit unmanageable in other 10x binoculars I've used. I saw this advertisement with Simon King (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGINwVavN_w) who basically says he usually uses 7x or 8x, but went with the 10x SF because of how much easier they are to hold.

I'd like to get experiences from other 10x SF users. Do you find them as steady as your 8x binoculars? Or is this just marketing?


Jack
For sure you should compare them in the hand for you with the similar Fov, 100grms lighter, new Nikon Monarch 10x42 HG (known as the MHG) , and see how the views stack up for you. Beautiful ergonomics on the Nikon's and feel well put together too.



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Old Monday 20th August 2018, 17:10   #14
Jack Speer
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Thanks for the tip Chosun :)


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Old Thursday 6th September 2018, 07:05   #15
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Originally Posted by Steve O4B View Post
The SF 10x42 is the easiest 10x42 to hold steady, but the real trick is how you hold the binoculars in the first place. With proper technique, anyone without a tremor or extremely little strength should be able to hold a 10x42 steady.


Most people tend to hold binoculars with only their thumbs underneath the barrels. If you let go with your fingers on top of the barrels, the binocular will start to fall. Instead, cock your wrists and rest the barrels on the heel of your thumb and the heel of your palm. This creates a platform instead of a seesaw. You can let go with your fingers and the binocular will not go anywhere. This also has the effect of bringing your elbows in against your sides, creating additional points of support. It may feel strange when you first try this, but I guarantee it will improve your steadiness.
I agree. Most casual users of bins have their hands opposite each other on the barrels which is the pivot point for a pair to pitch up or down. Offset the hands along the barrels and that is reduced. There are lots of subtle ways of holding the bins. One way I use for reducing shake or vibration is on the non focussing hand to use just the outstretched fingers underneath the barrel whose 'springiness' dampens out some of the shake. Different methods work for different people.
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Old Thursday 6th September 2018, 07:25   #16
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I agree. Most casual users of bins have their hands opposite each other on the barrels which is the pivot point for a pair to pitch up or down. Offset the hands along the barrels and that is reduced. There are lots of subtle ways of holding the bins. One way I use for reducing shake or vibration is on the non focussing hand to use just the outstretched fingers underneath the barrel whose 'springiness' dampens out some of the shake. Different methods work for different people.
Colin

I use this techniques quite a lot. With the left-hand optical tube resting on my fingertips it allows my left arm to be held considerably lower than my right arm and reduces fatigue in that arm as well as the fingers acting as a kind of 'suspension'. If my right arm begins to be tired I can grip the left tube in a conventional way and so bring support from my left arm into play to help my right arm. If required I can get a little more steadiness from the fingertip method by extending my left thumb back to my face and resting it there like a supporting bracket. However this technique isn't so successful in gusting wind so a full grip with both hands is required then.

I use the above technique a lot when observing behaviour for extended periods, but for all short and medium periods of viewing the SF's balance and grip does the job for me.

Lee
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