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Language question: waterbirds or water birds

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Old Thursday 2nd April 2020, 15:22   #26
janvanderbrugge
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Hello fugl, thank you for your reaction. I should not give an extension towards off-topic matters, but I take the liberty to translate the examples you gave, somehow to reward your avatar name and interest:
Dutch: denken, ik dacht, gedacht = to think, I thought, thought. Also, noun: gedachte = (a) thought
Afrikaans: dink, ek het gedink, gedink. Noun: gedagte (I wonder how they link those words in their minds)
Dutch: doen, ik deed/wij deden, gedaan = to do, I/we did, done
Afrikaans: doen, ek het gedoen/ons het gedoen, gedoen (there is still a word "gedaan" for: ready, exhausted!)
Dutch: gaan, ik ging, gegaan = to go, I went, gone
Afrikaans: gaan, ek het/is gegaan, gegaan
Dutch: vliegen, ik vloog/wij vlogen, gevlogen = to fly, I flew/we flew / flown (also: to run at high speed)
Afrikaans: vlieë, ek/ons het gevlieg, gevlieg [vlieg in Dutch and Afrikaans = fly, the insect]
de vogel is gevlogen = the bird has flown
Afrikaans: die voël het gevlieg
In this last example there would certainly be an impression of children's talk, like you remarked.
By the way, the phrase has a double meaning in Dutch: the culprit has disappeared.
Well, so do I, drifting still farther away from the shore(birds) and waterbirds of this topic . . .
Enjoy, stay fascinated in people's talk and healthy.
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Old Thursday 2nd April 2020, 21:42   #27
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Water birds

I understand wanting to group a batch of birds....so generally I have no problem with water birds as a catch all...

also like to say birds like Kingfishers always live by the water and differentiating them from, long-legged wading birds, gulls and terms, shorebirds etc., brings more clarity to any discussion of birds by water, including the waterfowl
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Old Saturday 4th April 2020, 10:54   #28
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Just to prolong this discussion a little, here's the latest BTO Annual Report on Waterbirds in the UK:
MJB

https://www.bto.org/sites/default/fi...fnRmEJiOIUqIgI
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Old Saturday 4th April 2020, 10:56   #29
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Seabirds as opposed to Sea birds ...

(why didn't think of that earlier!)
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 13:00   #30
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I have another question of the same kind, this one is more related to the habitat:

When referring to a large area covered by reeds, should we write reed beds or reedbeds?
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 13:05   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gonçalo Elias View Post
I have another question of the same kind, this one is more related to the habitat:

When referring to a large area covered by reeds, should we write reed beds or reedbeds?
Reedbeds has become a proper word in common use in the English language so yes.
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Old Friday 10th April 2020, 13:16   #32
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Thanks dantheman
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Old Tuesday 25th August 2020, 23:55   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farnboro John View Post
Waterbirds and wildfowl. The former encompasses wildfowl, crakes, rails and I would have thought herons etc, others may have their own opinions. Wildfowl is limited to ducks, geese and swans.

John
Geeting back to this waterbird issue...

I am aware that waterfowl refers mainly to ducks... then there is also wildfowl.

My question now is: are wildfowl and waterfowl one and the same thing, or is there a difference between both words?
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 01:11   #34
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Originally Posted by Gonçalo Elias View Post
My question now is: are wildfowl and waterfowl one and the same thing, or is there a difference between both words?
I guess the tame semi-domesticated bread-eating Mallards in city parks would count as waterfowl, but not wildfowl, as they're not exactly wild

Ditto Mute Swans.
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 03:41   #35
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Wildfowl goes along with 'wildfowling' which is all about the shooting of birds for the pot or for pleasure. So an inappropriate word to use these days in birding terms??

I've never used the term at any rate.
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 18:01   #36
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Originally Posted by dantheman View Post
Wildfowl goes along with 'wildfowling' which is all about the shooting of birds for the pot or for pleasure. So an inappropriate word to use these days in birding terms??

I've never used the term at any rate.
But then . . .

https://www.dutchbirding.nl/recensie..._north_america

https://books.google.co.uk/books/abo...IC&redir_esc=y

Both essential birders' literature, bet they're on your bookshelves
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 18:18   #37
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Thanks to both.
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 18:39   #38
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by dantheman View Post
Wildfowl goes along with 'wildfowling' which is all about the shooting of birds for the pot or for pleasure. So an inappropriate word to use these days in birding terms??

I've never used the term at any rate.
"Owling" also has a very different meaning for non-birder millennials.
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 21:05   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YuShan View Post
"Owling" also has a very different meaning for non-birder millennials.
A new one for me - apparently it was also a common term for the smuggling of sheep or wool from England to France.
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 21:08   #40
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Originally Posted by foresttwitcher View Post
... apparently it was also a common term for the smuggling of sheep or wool from England to France.
Presumably because the smuggling was done at night (owl time) when less likely to be detected
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 21:10   #41
dantheman
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Never taken part myself. Have done bunny hops of course, but that was many decades ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
But then . . .

https://www.dutchbirding.nl/recensie..._north_america

https://books.google.co.uk/books/abo...IC&redir_esc=y

Both essential birders' literature, bet they're on your bookshelves
Not on mine. It's an outdated phrase, with connotations. When were those published? Not sure what the real alternative is though, other than waterfowl.
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 21:13   #42
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Not on mine. It's an outdated phrase, with connotations. When were those published?
2015, and 2010, respectively, it gived publication dates on the pages

Tho' the latter is the 2nd edition, after the 1988 1st edition
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Old Wednesday 26th August 2020, 22:53   #43
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Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
2015, and 2010, respectively, it gived publication dates on the pages

Tho' the latter is the 2nd edition, after the 1988 1st edition
When did we start using "gived" as opposed to "gave"?

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Old Thursday 27th August 2020, 02:31   #44
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Originally Posted by Farnboro John View Post
When did we start using "gived" as opposed to "gave"?

John
No idea how that happened! I can't even blame auto-correct
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Old Thursday 27th August 2020, 13:42   #45
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No idea how that happened! I can't even blame auto-correct
Could the fact that ‘d’ is next to ‘s’ on a QWERTY keyboard have something to do with it?

Finger diet in order?

Edit: or proofreading.
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Old Thursday 27th August 2020, 14:29   #46
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Gives . . .yes, of course
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Old Thursday 27th August 2020, 16:05   #47
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Gives . . .yes, of course
In theory, proofreading is a good idea. In practice, you tend to read what you thought you’d written, not what you actually wrote
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Old Thursday 3rd September 2020, 18:19   #48
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Are kingfishers and dippers "waterbirds"?
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Old Thursday 3rd September 2020, 18:25   #49
dantheman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farnboro John View Post
When did we start using "gived" as opposed to "gave"?

John
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
No idea how that happened! I can't even blame auto-correct
I thought he was just trying to prove by using 'ye olde english' that his previous posts were current enough to make them relevant ...
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Last edited by dantheman : Thursday 3rd September 2020 at 18:29.
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Old Thursday 3rd September 2020, 18:28   #50
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Are kingfishers and dippers "waterbirds"?
I think they are in this context ... ie 'birds of the water or waterside landscape' that live in or feed in water. Wouldn't be surprised to see them in a ladybird waterbirds book ... But I expect opinions may differ ...
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