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Shieldbugs.

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Old Saturday 5th June 2004, 00:19   #26
Michael Frankis
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Hi Harry,

Not knowingly, but looking at the pic on the website above, I suspect I'd have confused it with the Hawthorn SB, as the pattern of brown & green is similar. If the names mean anything, though, there's a lot of Hawthorn around here, but not much Birch - so perhaps unlikely?

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Old Saturday 5th June 2004, 09:38   #27
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael Frankis
Hi Harry,

Not knowingly, but looking at the pic on the website above, I suspect I'd have confused it with the Hawthorn SB, as the pattern of brown & green is similar. If the names mean anything, though, there's a lot of Hawthorn around here, but not much Birch - so perhaps unlikely?

Michael
Hello Michael,
I had suspected your Green shieldbug would be one or other of the species you mention. Both are in fact common throughout Northumberland and Durham. They are easily separated on size and shape alone. The Hawthorn shieldbug being much larger than the Birch.

The Birch Shieldbug sticks very much to it's own foodplant whereas the Hawthorn shieldbug can be found on numerous berry bearing trees in gardens, hedgerows and woodlands.

A species very similar to the Birch Shieldbug is the Juniper Shieldbug which I have found on wild Juniper in the uplands of both counties. Until fairly recently this was in severe national decline due to the loss of it's foodplant, however, down south it had adapted to feed on Lawsons Cypress a fairly common garden tree in southern England. It hasn't been recorded on this tree locally. It is suspected that this bug has been imported accidently, along with the trees from abroad. I suppose that DNA testing could determine that, but it's beyond my technical ability, and also my wallets ability to pay to have it done. lol.

An excellent book if your interested is: Shieldbugs of Surrey by Roger D. Hawkins. 2003. At 15.00 for a hardback book it's very good value. 192 pages and colour photographs of all the British Shieldbugs. You could ask your local library to get a copy for you to read.

Harry
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 03:15   #28
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Hello Harry, here's one for you.
I've had this photo on my website for quite a while with 'colourful beetle/bug' as a rather poor description. An ID so I can put a proper description would be appreciated.
Probably too long ago to be useful for your records - It landed on my spotting scope case whilst out birding on Headley Heath Surrey 11th Sept 2002!

Dylan.
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 07:35   #29
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Hi Harry

This little beastie came into our house on 11/08/2003 and the photos were taken just after 11pm. I live in South Warwickshire and this bug's photo was taken on one of our lamp shades.
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 08:53   #30
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reader
Hi Harry

This little beastie came into our house on 11/08/2003 and the photos were taken just after 11pm. I live in South Warwickshire and this bug's photo was taken on one of our lamp shades.
Hello Reader,
Your specimen is the Forest Shieldbug Pentatoma rufipes (Linnaeus 1758). The clues are the very distinctive shape of the 'shoulders', the red tip to the scutellum*, the red legs and red basal segments to the antennae.

It is one of the widely distributed Shieldbugs and also one of the commonest.
It's specific name 'rufipes' means red-legged. The nymphs are carnivors and suck the juices out of lepidopterous larvae.

* The great majority of specimens have a red tip on the scutellum. However, I have occasionally encountered specimens where this red tip has been replaced by orange, yellow or white.

Like many other species of Hemiptera, occasional specimens are attracted to light. It is mainly to be found wherever Oak occurs, but can be beaten from many other trees which support large numbers of lepidopterous larvae.

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 10:37   #31
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Thanks Harry

The only question now (in my naivety) is the fact that we are miles from any woods and the only nearby trees are willows and nothing else for at least 3 to 400 yards away and even those are very sparse.
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 10:41   #32
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Shield Bug

Hi Harry ! I have spotted several shield bugs on my rhubarb,on my allotment.Quite big and green,with a small shield shape within the shield shape itself.They seem to like walking around on the leaves !These are in Headington,Oxford.What might they be ? Also a brown one.
Mervyn.
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 10:49   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reader
Thanks Harry

The only question now (in my naivety) is the fact that we are miles from any woods and the only nearby trees are willows and nothing else for at least 3 to 400 yards away and even those are very sparse.
Hi again Reader,
Insects, like many other creatures do turn up in the strangest of places. Willow does support a good number of lepidopterous larvae so it's quite possible it came from one of these trees. Being winged, they can and do disperse over a wide area, so they can turn up anywhere. As I said they are not confined to a specific tree, they can be found in hawthorn hedges, on fruit trees and bushes indeed anywhere they can find food. Oak is popular with Forest Shieldbugs sinply because more insect larvae can be found on this tree than any other.

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 10:52   #34
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Thanks for the info Harry.
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:11   #35
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dylan
Hello Harry, here's one for you.
I've had this photo on my website for quite a while with 'colourful beetle/bug' as a rather poor description. An ID so I can put a proper description would be appreciated.
Probably too long ago to be useful for your records - It landed on my spotting scope case whilst out birding on Headley Heath Surrey 11th Sept 2002!

Dylan.
Hello Dylan,
The angle of your picture doesn't give a good view of the 'shoulders' or the shape of the 'shield'. However based on the fact that we only have three green and red shieldbugs and only one of these has red tips to it's legs I'm sure it is Hawthorn Shieldbug Acanthosoma haemorroidale (Linnaeus 1758)

If you type the name into Google you should find several pictures of it which you may recognise. It is a common species over most of Britain.

Harry
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:21   #36
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Is this a Hawthorne then.. it landed on me while I was constucting a table!
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:22   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by headington7
Hi Harry ! I have spotted several shield bugs on my rhubarb,on my allotment.Quite big and green,with a small shield shape within the shield shape itself.They seem to like walking around on the leaves !These are in Headington,Oxford.What might they be ? Also a brown one.
Mervyn.
Hello Mervyn,

All Shieldbugs have that small shield shape within the overall shield shape, the inner shield is the scutellum. There are several species of shieldbug which are varying shades of green and also several which are brown. To add to the complication of colour, many species change colour in the autumn or do not attain their full colouring until after hibernation. Without a picture I'm afraid it's impossible to identify them from your description, sorry. None of the Shieldbugs are attached to Rhubarb the leaves of which are poisonous to most creatures. It's more likely they were basking in the sunshine.

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:27   #38
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Ah no... its shorter than Hawthorn - actually it looks most like the Sloe one CJW posted, but without the hairs... I'm sure you will ID it Harry!
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:31   #39
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane Turner
Is this a Hawthorne then.. it landed on me while I was constucting a table!
Hi Jane,
No it's not a Hawthorne Shieldbug, it's A Sloe Shieldbug Dolycoris baccarum (Linnaeus 1758) A nice fresh specimen by the look of it. I wish I saw more of them up north.

regards,

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:35   #40
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I'm pretty far north! Map ref = SJ214893, taken today!
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:37   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane Turner
Ah no... its shorter than Hawthorn - actually it looks most like the Sloe one CJW posted, but without the hairs... I'm sure you will ID it Harry!
Well spotted Jane, your learning quickly, the hairs on the pronotum are very fine and don't always show up in photographs. It looks like your becoming a budding Hemipterist.

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:38   #42
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Will get the green ones in the front later... I'm guessing gorse since I have gorse plants!
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:42   #43
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I'm pretty far north! Map ref = SJ214893, taken today!
You may think your in the north Jane, but not as far north as me. lol. As far I am concerned Merseyside is in the Midlands. I'ts just a matter of viewpoint dependant on where you live. lol. Thanks for the record data, can you give me the location on Merseyside I don't have a map of that area. Thanks

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:46   #44
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Originally Posted by Jane Turner
Will get the green ones in the front later... I'm guessing gorse since I have gorse plants!
It's quite possible that your right Jane, but there are several other green Shieldbugs that are a possibility as well. Post a picture if you can get one.
Gorse shieldbugs have been out of hibernation for some time so you should be seeing them now.

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:52   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry eales
You may think your in the north Jane, but not as far north as me. lol. As far I am concerned Merseyside is in the Midlands. I'ts just a matter of viewpoint dependant on where you live. lol. Thanks for the record data, can you give me the location on Merseyside I don't have a map of that area. Thanks

Harry
Hi Harry,

Agreed, Merseycide is in the Midlands

Here's the position (at the arrow):
http://www.streetmap.co.uk/newmap.sr...rch.srf&dn=719

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:55   #46
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http://www.streetmap.co.uk/newmap.sr...rch.srf&dn=719
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 11:55   #47
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Snap! Though your arrow is in the front garden and mine is in the back garden!
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 12:42   #48
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Thanks for the references Michael and Jane, much appreciated.

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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 15:07   #49
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harry, this one was in an MV moth trap this morning. I'd guess about middling in size (ie, I've seen larger)
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Old Sunday 6th June 2004, 15:17   #50
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harry, this one was in an MV moth trap this morning. I'd guess about middling in size (ie, I've seen larger)

Hi Angus,

Your photograph is a specimen of The Hawthorn Shieldbug Acanthosoma haemorrhoidale a post hibernation specimen. Not at all uncommon in Ireland including the northern counties. As it's name implies, to be found on Hawthorn, but also can be beaten from almost any berry-bearing tree. It's one of the largest of all the british species so you may have one that suffered undernourishment as a nymph.

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