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Shieldbugs.

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Old Tuesday 13th July 2004, 19:26   #76
alanhill
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I took this photo yeserday on the river Weaver, near Northwich in Cheshire. It doe look very similar to the one Jane Turner posted.

Alan Hill
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Old Tuesday 13th July 2004, 19:51   #77
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianhstone
I suspect this isn't a shieldbug at all. Over to you Harry.
Hi Brian,
You suspect correctly, it isn't a shieldbug nymph but one of the common green plantbug nymphs. I don't have any keys for the nymphs of these, so unfortunately can't help further, other than to suggest it is probably one of the Miriads.

I don't have the time to take on the whole 'bug' group which comprises of over 520 species and involves both terrestrial and aquatic species.

Harry
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Old Tuesday 13th July 2004, 20:03   #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alanhill
I took this photo yeserday on the river Weaver, near Northwich in Cheshire. It doe look very similar to the one Jane Turner posted.

Alan Hill
Hi Alan,
Your Shieldbug is the Forest Shieldbug, Pentatoma rufipes. Despite it's name it's also common in gardens. The nymphs and adults are both sap suckers and carnivors, small lepidopterous larva are a favourite food. They don't actually eat the larva, they just suck all the juices out of them.

Harry
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Old Monday 19th July 2004, 22:15   #79
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What are these bugs?

I would be most grateful for any help in identifying these little fellas. They are about ladybird size. They don't seem to have any wing-case so not beetles? They seem to have 6 legs so not ticks? Are they possibly at an earlier stage in their development?

The photo was taken at Strumpshaw Fen, Norfolk, UK on 20 June 2004.
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Old Tuesday 20th July 2004, 04:04   #80
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Can't find anything resembling them in my books but looks like some form of shield bug, one of the real entymoligists out there will come up with the answer. Sorry, but they are cute looking things.
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Old Wednesday 21st July 2004, 07:38   #81
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Originally Posted by jayhunter
Can't find anything resembling them in my books but looks like some form of shield bug, one of the real entymoligists out there will come up with the answer. Sorry, but they are cute looking things.
Thanks Bob. I did consider shield bugs, but they don't seem to have the right shape. However, I'm certainly no expert. I await an opinion from one of the real entymologist.

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Old Wednesday 21st July 2004, 11:58   #82
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Immatures, that's why no wings. Hemipterans or Homopterans of some kind (never could get those two orders straight in my mind...)

No real endymionologist here. More of an etymologist if anything.
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Old Wednesday 21st July 2004, 12:06   #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles Harper
Immatures, that's why no wings. Hemipterans or Homopterans of some kind (never could get those two orders straight in my mind...)

No real endymionologist here. More of an etymologist if anything.
Thanks Charles. I've just received an email from a friend who knows an expert who says "your bugs seem to be the nymphs of a predatory shieldbug 'Picromerus bidens'"

Having looked them up in my book (Chinery - Insects of Britain & N Europe) I would just love to see the adults.

So Bob (Jayhunter) was right as well.

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Old Wednesday 21st July 2004, 13:02   #84
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They aremymphs of true bugs of the family Pentatomidae; they may be of the species Picromerus bidens, but I am no expert in bugs

O , sorry ...has been answered already
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Old Wednesday 21st July 2004, 13:14   #85
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Originally Posted by Joern Lehmhus
They aremymphs of true bugs of the family Pentatomidae; they may be of the species Picromerus bidens, but I am no expert in bugs

O , sorry ...has been answered already
No problem. It is great to get further confirmation.

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Old Wednesday 21st July 2004, 14:04   #86
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Smith
I would be most grateful for any help in identifying these little fellas. They are about ladybird size. They don't seem to have any wing-case so not beetles? They seem to have 6 legs so not ticks? Are they possibly at an earlier stage in their development?

The photo was taken at Strumpshaw Fen, Norfolk, UK on 20 June 2004.
Hello Dave,
I can confirm that these are the nymphs of P.bidens the Two Spined Shieldbug, sometimes known as The Spikey Shieldbug.

Harry
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Old Wednesday 21st July 2004, 14:33   #87
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Originally Posted by harry eales
Hello Dave,
I can confirm that these are the nymphs of P.bidens the Two Spined Shieldbug, sometimes known as The Spikey Shieldbug.

Harry
Thanks Harry, and also for their common names.

Dave
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Old Wednesday 28th July 2004, 14:23   #88
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Another one for Harry. Found just now on my office window near centre of Peterborough, UK.
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Old Wednesday 28th July 2004, 18:03   #89
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianhstone
Another one for Harry. Found just now on my office window near centre of Peterborough, UK.
Hello Brian,
It's a Gorse Shieldbug. The greenish/yellow colouring and the heavy punctation of the upper surfaces give it away immediately. There must be some Gorse or Broom in the vicinity, or, it's been accidently brought into the area. It is common just about everywhere these two plants occur.

Harry
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Old Monday 2nd August 2004, 11:48   #90
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another shieldbug

Is this a sloe bug - Dolycoris baccarum? (grassland/scrub in Bedfordshire)
Thanks,
Hugh
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Old Monday 2nd August 2004, 11:53   #91
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 138mph
Is this a sloe bug - Dolycoris baccarum? (grassland/scrub in Bedfordshire)
Thanks,
Hugh
Hello Hugh,
Spot on with your ID, it is D.baccarum. It's common where you are, and like Hen's teeth where I am. I have only ever seen one in Northumberland which was the third record for the county in 150 years.

Harry
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Old Monday 2nd August 2004, 13:15   #92
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Some sort of squash bug?

Thanks, for instant confirmation of Sloe Bug, just remembered that I had seen this creature - spotted July 25 in scrub around a Bedfordshire gravel pit.
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Old Tuesday 3rd August 2004, 18:39   #93
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Originally Posted by 138mph
Thanks, for instant confirmation of Sloe Bug, just remembered that I had seen this creature - spotted July 25 in scrub around a Bedfordshire gravel pit.
Hrllo Hugh,
Your pic is that of a bug, but it's not a Shieldbug. Sorry, but it's not something I know by sight. There's over 500 British species of bugs. It's just the Shieldbugs I do.

Harry.
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Old Thursday 5th August 2004, 07:09   #94
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Wink

Hi Harry,

I live in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Tonight A shieldbug decided to visit me while I was at my computer. I was freaking out because I have never seen one before and didin't even know what it was called. After quite a bit of research I ended up on this site and registered for the forum Here is a picture of my friend.
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Old Thursday 5th August 2004, 07:28   #95
harry eales
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prtyblueiz
Hi Harry,

I live in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Tonight A shieldbug decided to visit me while I was at my computer. I was freaking out because I have never seen one before and didin't even know what it was called. After quite a bit of research I ended up on this site and registered for the forum Here is a picture of my friend.
Hello Prtyblueiz,

Welcome the Bird Forum (entomological section) You certainly do have a Shieldbug which I believe are better known collectively as Stinkbugs on your side of 'the pond.'

Unfortunately I can't identify it for you as I only have data on British species, and your picture is somewhat indistinct. Your local library may have a book on American species which would help you. Many can be recognised by colour or colour pattern alone. If you are wondering why they are called Stinkbugs get your nose close to one and sniff (lol).

Regards,

Harry
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Old Thursday 5th August 2004, 21:21   #96
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Harry,

Yet again I seek your assistance. Glad shieldbugs are your thing! Can you sort this little fella out that was in my garden today?
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Old Thursday 5th August 2004, 23:53   #97
harry eales
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Harry,

Yet again I seek your assistance. Glad shieldbugs are your thing! Can you sort this little fella out that was in my garden today?
Hi Drinker,
No problem at all my son, it's The Forest Shieldbug Pentatoma rufipes
Despite it's name it is generally a common species in gardens as well. It feeds as both larva and adult, on the juices of berries of various sorts and also on the body juices of lepidopterous larva, and probable those of Sawflies as well.
There is very little variation in this species except for the colour of the spot on the scutellum, where the red dot is sometimes replaced by white, yellow or pink.
Harry.
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Old Friday 6th August 2004, 07:28   #98
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Harry, I've seen Sloe bug and Forest shieldbug recently.
Do you have info on whether they're common in my area?
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Old Friday 6th August 2004, 10:20   #99
harry eales
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Harry, I've seen Sloe bug and Forest shieldbug recently.
Do you have info on whether they're common in my area?
Hello Angus,
As you are probably well aware Ireland is much under-recorded entomologically, (although recently things seem to be improving) and the Hemiptera-Homoptera have hardly any enthusiastic followers even on the British mainland. The last text book on the British Species was published back in 1959. There have been no provisional Atlas's published on any of the Plant or Water Bugs. As far as I am aware the National Recorder still uses a card index for keeping records although there may be some at BRC that are computerised.

I do know that both Sloe and Forest Shieldbugs are recorded from Ireland but I cannot give you their current Status. Perhaps the Irish equivilent of BRC will have more data.

If you have Juniper in your area it would be worth beating the female berry bearing forms to see if you can find the Juniper Shieldbug. There is only one very old, unverified record for the whole of Ireland. Pictures of this insect can be seen at the following site:-

http://www.bioimages.org.uk/HTML/P58933.HTM

In 2000 I found this species on several sites in Northumberland and Durham on Juniper, although the textbooks said that it didn't occur north of Lancashire. The adults are out now till mid Sept.

Harry
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Old Friday 6th August 2004, 23:59   #100
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Any ideas please

This is very similar to a Nezara viridula but it's not green and I found it on a thistle head in a wood in North Notts.
Any ideas !
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