Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

The Hoverfly Thread

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 10 votes, 4.90 average.
Old Saturday 9th September 2006, 20:05   #76
steve covey
Jack of all Orders - Master of None
 
steve covey's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Swindon, Wilts.England
Posts: 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreybirder
This one is definitely a hoverfly.
I thought it might be Syrphus ribesii but am far from sure.
Ken
Hi Ken, #70 and#72 are the 'domestic' honey bee [you can see the 4 wings in one of the shots].
As Brian said, #73 is nigh impossible from the pic but I'd have a stab at S. vitripennis.
Cheers,
Steve.
__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/od0man/
This mail is a natural product. The slight variation in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws
or defects.
steve covey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 20th September 2006, 22:16   #77
steve covey
Jack of all Orders - Master of None
 
steve covey's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Swindon, Wilts.England
Posts: 319
Hi all,
chuffed to bits that I found a 'new' species for me the other day - and a scarce species to boot; Epistrophe diaphana!
Cheers,
Steve.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Epistrophe diaphana[poss]m.SpyePark.15-09-06.jpg
Views:	225
Size:	59.9 KB
ID:	59151  
__________________
http://www.flickr.com/photos/od0man/
This mail is a natural product. The slight variation in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way are to be considered flaws
or defects.
steve covey is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 30th September 2006, 09:51   #78
Roger Morris
Registered User

 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Stamford
Posts: 28
This looks to me to be Eristalis tenax - the hind femur and tibia are diagnostic (also front tarsi are dark)

Roger


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tockman
Not many birds around yesterday, so turned my camera on anything that moved in the garden! is this one a Hoverfly?
Roger Morris is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 30th September 2006, 09:54   #79
Roger Morris
Registered User

 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Stamford
Posts: 28
This is the hive bee Apis mellifera - you can tell it is a bee because it has two sets of wings (flies have one set and a pair of halteres)

In terms of determining whether a fly is a hoverfly - the one diagnostic character that is critical is the presence of a vena spuria - a kind of false vein that allows the wing to flex up and down (and creates the hovering motion).

Regards

Roger


Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreybirder
Yes, it would be quite helpful for me to know how you tell if a fly is a hoverfly or not. I photoed something in the garden the other day (4/9) and then thought that it looked more bee-like.
Ken
Roger Morris is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 30th September 2006, 09:56   #80
Roger Morris
Registered User

 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Stamford
Posts: 28
This I think is Eupeodes latifasciatus but I cannot be entirely certain (vague possibility of E. bucculatus).

Roger

Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreybirder
This one is definitely a hoverfly.
I thought it might be Syrphus ribesii but am far from sure.
Ken
Roger Morris is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 30th September 2006, 20:29   #81
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Morris
This I think is Eupeodes latifasciatus but I cannot be entirely certain (vague possibility of E. bucculatus).

Roger
Thanks, Roger,
I'll have to try and get better photos! (Not easy with an autofocus camera)
Ken
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 31st May 2007, 12:32   #82
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
31 May 2007

I finally managed to get a reasonable photo of a hoverfly in my garden.
Does anyone know what it is - at least to genus level?
Ken
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	hoverfly (650).jpg
Views:	168
Size:	154.3 KB
ID:	87156  Click image for larger version

Name:	hoverfly (front) (650).jpg
Views:	156
Size:	75.6 KB
ID:	87159  

Last edited by Surreybirder : Thursday 31st May 2007 at 12:35.
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 31st May 2007, 13:53   #83
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
I'm glad to see the return of the 'hoverfly thread' - was beginning to think they had become extinct. I've seen very few hoverflies this year other than a *few* Eristalis last month. Is this a general thing in UK or just my neck of the woods?

Couldn't the thread be made a sticky?
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 31st May 2007, 14:05   #84
Mis
Registered User
 
Mis's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Chislehurst, Kent
Posts: 159
I've seen several species recently but I'm still trying to get to grips with hoverflies so I'm not too sure what they were. I saw Rhingia campestris several days ago but most are unidentifieds for now!

It would be useful if this was a sticky. I hadn't realised there was a hoverfly thread and would have posted some of my photos here.
Mis is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 31st May 2007, 14:40   #85
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
I've not seen many hoverflies, Paul, although the marmalade fly has been around for a while. Also some really small ones that I think are virtually impossible to ID from photos (because the hide under their wings when they are stationary).
How does one go about making a thread into a sticky?
Ken
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 31st May 2007, 15:10   #86
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
We could ask that nice Andy Bright who provided the ladybird thread .. but I've forgotten how to do it .... does everyone shout, "Andy ...."?
It will all come back ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreybirder View Post
How does one go about making a thread into a sticky?
Ken
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 31st May 2007, 18:22   #87
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
Coming back to my hoverfly I think it might be a male Syrphus ribesii which is said to be 'among the most familiar of hoverflies throughout Britain... often being found in gardens'.
Ken

Last edited by Surreybirder : Thursday 31st May 2007 at 18:44.
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 1st June 2007, 13:42   #88
Imaginos
Registered User
 
Imaginos's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreybirder View Post
Coming back to my hoverfly I think it might be a male Syrphus ribesii which is said to be 'among the most familiar of hoverflies throughout Britain... often being found in gardens'.
Ken
...or S. vitripennis the difference between the males is that vitripennis has black hairs on the hind femora and microtrichia (tiny hairs) on the basal cells of the wing. Can't see enough to be sure that either character is absent I'm afraid. Both species are rather common.
Imaginos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 1st June 2007, 14:47   #89
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imaginos View Post
...or S. vitripennis the difference between the males is that vitripennis has black hairs on the hind femora and microtrichia (tiny hairs) on the basal cells of the wing. Can't see enough to be sure that either character is absent I'm afraid. Both species are rather common.
That neatly sums up why I don't do many hoverfly IDs!
But thanks for your input Imaginos. At least I know what genus it belongs to.
Ken
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 1st June 2007, 17:32   #90
Imaginos
Registered User
 
Imaginos's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 429
Alan Stubb's 'British Hoverflies' makes the identification as painless as possible-look out for it, the keys & plates are good & the descriptions take into account similar species so you needn't key them out if you don't want to & can go by the traditional method of looking at the pictures.
Imaginos is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 1st June 2007, 17:55   #91
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Imaginos View Post
Alan Stubb's 'British Hoverflies' makes the identification as painless as possible-look out for it, the keys & plates are good & the descriptions take into account similar species so you needn't key them out if you don't want to & can go by the traditional method of looking at the pictures.
Believe it or not, I already have it... that's how I worked out that it was a Syrphus. (I looked at the pix )
Ken
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 3rd June 2007, 14:23   #92
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
There seem to be lots of hoverflies in our garden now, mainly quite small ones. I don't seem to have much success at photographing them. The two I got are, I think, another Syrphus (probably not determinable) and one which I don't think is a hoverfly at all - I seem to remember that it's some sort of parasitic fly. Any ID help would be appreciated.
Ken
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	hoverfly 1a (650).jpg
Views:	148
Size:	54.7 KB
ID:	87632  Click image for larger version

Name:	hoverfly 1b (650).jpg
Views:	146
Size:	54.0 KB
ID:	87633  Click image for larger version

Name:	fly 1c (650).jpg
Views:	157
Size:	92.9 KB
ID:	87634  
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 4th June 2007, 10:10   #93
Brian Stone
A Stone chatting
 
Brian Stone's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 6,046
Some good pics Ken. Most hovers are hard from photos and I think recent splits in the Syrphus genus makes them virtually impossible to assign to anything other than an agg.

Try to get lateral as well as dorsal shots and ensure the legs are clearly shown. Also get a shot head on as the face pattern can be important.

Mark van Veen has published several keys on the web and his book is worth a look too:
http://home.hccnet.nl/mp.van.veen/fe_ento.html

Look at the species lisings on the Hoverfly Recording Scheme's website to get a score to indicate how difficult each species is to ID:
http://www.hoverfly.org.uk/

I've seen plenty of hovers in favoured areas so far this year including R. campestris, L. lucorum, H. pendulus and trittivatus, E. luniger, Syrphus and Eristalis spp. as well as the difficult smaller species.
Brian Stone is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Tuesday 5th June 2007, 15:01   #94
Brian Stone
A Stone chatting
 
Brian Stone's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 6,046
Found a rich seam this lunchtime with many species flying around some flowering privet including these two beauties:
Xanthogramma pedisequum
Volucella bombylans (white-tailed form)
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	xanthogramma_pedisequum_5jun07_1024l_20.jpg
Views:	168
Size:	57.0 KB
ID:	88072  Click image for larger version

Name:	volucella_bombylans_5jun07_800l_20.jpg
Views:	185
Size:	91.0 KB
ID:	88073  
Brian Stone is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Wednesday 6th June 2007, 11:12   #95
paul mabbott
Urban space man
 
paul mabbott's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Sheffield, UK
Posts: 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surreybirder View Post
.... although the marmalade fly has been around for a while.
Saw my first local E. balteatus yesterday - which is seriously late, still very few other species despite the spell of warm weather.
paul mabbott is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 6th June 2007, 11:22   #96
Brian Stone
A Stone chatting
 
Brian Stone's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 6,046
I think my first this year were on 15 Apr but they have been generally rather thin on the ground so far. Good numbers of species were out on 30 Apr but on the whole it's been quite poor.
Brian Stone is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Friday 8th June 2007, 11:38   #97
Brian Stone
A Stone chatting
 
Brian Stone's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 6,046
A couple more recent shots. H. pendulus is very common and C. illustrata apparently common on umbels like Angelica but this was my first.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	cheilosia_illustrata_7jun07_800l_20.jpg
Views:	171
Size:	82.0 KB
ID:	88508  Click image for larger version

Name:	helophilus_pendulus_5jun07_800p_20.jpg
Views:	160
Size:	62.8 KB
ID:	88509  

Last edited by Brian Stone : Friday 8th June 2007 at 16:17.
Brian Stone is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 10th June 2007, 18:29   #98
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
any thoughts on this smallish one?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	hoverfly 1b (800)(low res).jpg
Views:	147
Size:	107.1 KB
ID:	88798  
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 10th June 2007, 20:26   #99
Brian Stone
A Stone chatting
 
Brian Stone's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Peterborough, UK
Posts: 6,046
It's a Sphaerophoria sp. and these are supposed to be really hard, especially as that's a female. Would be surprised if it wasn't scripta though.
Brian Stone is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2005 2006 2007 2008 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 10th June 2007, 20:38   #100
Surreybirder
Ken Noble
 
Surreybirder's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Lingfield Surrey
Posts: 8,278
Blog Entries: 1
thanks, Brian. I hope to ID one to species level (apart from marmalade fly) one of these days!
Ken
Surreybirder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Amusing stories thread anyone? (recovered) Andrew Rowlands Birds & Birding 3 Saturday 30th September 2006 21:00
Pager slaves - doncha hate 'em? peter hayes Birds & Birding 92 Monday 5th May 2003 19:07

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.17803407 seconds with 38 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 04:46.