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HBWAlive Key; mission accomplished or mission impossible?

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Old Wednesday 20th May 2020, 06:19   #476
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
sapiti.
Caprimulgus sapiti Temminck for Pr. Neuweid is mentioned in a 1823 book:
https://www.google.com/books/edition...sec=frontcover .
There is a word Sapitiba mentioned many times here:
file:///C:/Users/Owner/Downloads/Straubeetal2007.pdf .
See also https://books.google.com/books?id=KCwBAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA129: Must be somewhere here https://www.flickr.com/photos/quasebart/23540602699 . Maybe this map https://de.todocoleccion.net/kunst-k...#sobre_el_lote ma help,

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Old Wednesday 20th May 2020, 07:12   #477
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Mark (and Martin), before you dig any further (and repeat what's been done/found earlier, way back), in this loooooooong thread ...

See the attached PDF in post 461, with quotes from the dear old HBW (no longer) Alive Key (per 9th of May), and the earlier post dealing with the same topic/s:

Quote:
sapiti as in "Caprimulgus sapiti" BONAPARTE 1850 (also see #265-267, 272-273 in this thread)
Quote:
sapiti
Most probably a toponym (i.e. Sapitiba, a locality near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where Natterer collected this bird (Björn Bergenholtz in litt.)); "142. Chordeiles, Sw. ... 1. CAPRIMULGUS virginianus, Br. nec Vieill. ... *2. CAPRIMULGUS sapiti, Natter. Mus. Vindobonens. ex Amer. m. Satis similispraecedenti, at minor, dilutior, cinerascens nec nigricans."(Bonaparte 1850, Conspectus Gen. Avium, I (i), 63) (syn. Chordeiles acutipennis).
Quote:
tigus as in "Ixos tigus" "BONAPARTE 1850" (also see #344-349 in this thread)
Quote:
tigus
Perhaps from a local name for some sort of bird on Sumatra (see tiga), or a deliberate curtailment of tympanistrigus to reflect this bulbul's smaller size; "564. Brachypus, Sw. 1824. nec Wolf. ... *11. IXOS tigus, Müll. Mus. Lugd. ex Sumatra. Similis praeced. [Ixos leucogrammicus] viridis et subtus squamatus; sed minor, et macula auriculari flava." (Bonaparte 1850, Conspectus Gen. Avium, I, 264) (syn. Pycnonotus tympanistrigus).
Simply/only to save you (and/or anyone else) some unwarranted work ...

Cheers!

Björn
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Old Thursday 21st May 2020, 19:34   #478
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Björn thanks for this reminder that there is the results of a lot of work by BF members in its archives. In the beauharnaisii/beauharnaesii thread I found brand new info in 2020 that actually I had posted in 2015. But in five years there has been many primary sources digitalized and placed online and we need to check frequently. I believe the Natterer/ Temmimck name sapiti was published in some ephemera like a guide to the Imperial museum or other and I am going to keep looking for it.
MR. SCLATER ON THE AMERICAN CAPRIMULGIDAE 1866 says sapiti was bird No, 94. Of what I am not sure? Pelzeln 1865 talks about Natterer collecting in Sapitiva with a ‘v’ in February 1818,
https://www.zobodat.at/pdf/Reise-Nov..._0001-0176.pdf .
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Old Saturday 23rd May 2020, 09:55   #479
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Caprimulgus sapiti BONAPARTE 1850

Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
...
I believe the Natterer/ Temmimck name sapiti was published in some ephemera like a guide to the Imperial museum or other and I am going to keep looking for it.
MR. SCLATER ON THE AMERICAN CAPRIMULGIDAE 1866 says sapiti was bird No, 94. Of what I am not sure? Pelzeln 1865 talks about Natterer collecting in Sapitiva with a ‘v’ in February 1818, ...
Mark, regarding your thoughts on "No, 94"; and Bonaparte's "Caprimulgus sapiti Natt. Mus. Vindob. (No.94)", see my post #265 (and all its links), incl. Diesing's foot-note [even if the latter slightly digress from the subject (it doesn't add much, and absolutely nothing on the Etymology, of sapiti), as it only, as far as I can tell, takes us further back, to Rudolphi's "Synopsis entozoorum" (i.e Entozoorum synopsis ...), from 1819 (a work about parasites, which incl. a list of on birds, on where those were found), a text/list that, in its turn, only lists an unidentified: "294. Caprimulgi sp. brasil" (here)].

Which at that point (in 1819), would refer to a/one, or two, yet unidentified specimen/s of the "Caprimulgi" Nightjars, kept in the Vienna Museum collection, most likely delivered, in one of the earliest shipments from Natterer, collected during his travels in Brazil, that started in 1817 (and went on all the way until 1835).

To me it (still) looks like sapiti was/is a name originally coined by Temminck (even if later attributed to Natterer), possibly in an unpublished list of the specimens recently received, or maybe by Natterer himself (on the specimen labels?), both seemingly "in MS".

If Temminck ever published it (either in a short list, alt. with a description, however brief), and if so where, I simply do not know, but he seems to have used the name sapiti, as early as in the 1820's and 1830's. This far we've found at least two; "sapiti Tem." (in 1823) and "C. Sapiti Tem." (in 1836), strongly indicating that Temminck did use it (somewhere) prior to that, far earlier than Bonaparte 1850. It could be a case of an original intention of; Temminck ex Natterrer?), who knows?

Take it all for what it's worth. There's a lot of probably/possibly (read; guesses and speculations) in the line of arguments (reasonings) above, but that's as far as I can reach. Sorry. As you (all) would know by now, German isn't my strong side. Nor is Latin.

However, as always; don't hesitate to remark on any part, whatever minor or major, if you (or anyone else) think otherwise.

And: Good luck finding the unknown "ephemera" by "Natterer/Temmimck". I have no clue if such a print ever existed. But I would think it (maybe) might could have been, as I noted that the numbers of the birds in Diesing's foot-note doesn't match (the other parasite hosts/birds, in) Rudolphi's work. On the other hand, it could, just as well, have been nothing but a handwritten list, in the Vienna Museum (for their Staff, and visiting guests?), again; who knows?

Either way, I feel pretty convinced that we've got the proper Etymology for sapiti.

Cheers!

Björn

PS. It's clearly written "Sapitiba" (here). Also see; "Handschriftlische Notizen von J. Natterer", also by von Pelzeln, (here).
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Last edited by Calalp : Saturday 23rd May 2020 at 10:02. Reason: my usua typo
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Old Monday 25th May 2020, 08:35   #480
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Caprimulgus sapiti BONAPARTE 1850

One last, additional, short question regarding sapiti (for our Latin scholars):

What does "(ut sup.)" stands for/mean, in/at the end of John Cassin's reference, from 1st of November 1851 (here, see No. 5) ... ?

Just curious (even if it, of course, doesn't concern the Etymology itself )

/B
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Old Monday 25th May 2020, 09:17   #481
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Latin ut supra as above (i.e. referring to Bonaparte's Conspectus previously mentioned).
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Old Monday 25th May 2020, 10:00   #482
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Thanks James!

Now I've (finally) said all I can in this certain topic.

sapiti .... over and out! (a least on my part)

/B
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Old Tuesday 26th May 2020, 05:56   #483
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Fantastic work Björn!
In a 1819 publication Natterer sends various missives to be published in this Journal. He mentions Sapitiva and the Hyacinth Macaw.
https://books.google.com/books?id=E4...tterer&f=false .
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Old Sunday 31st May 2020, 11:06   #484
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Updated Summary, ver. 3.2

Guys, some ten days ago (sorry for the delay) I asked a Moderator to delete one of my earlier post (at that point #462; headed "Updated Summary, ver. 3.1"), as it was causing nothing but confusion (and some unwarranted work/posts). And the very same day, after only a few minutes (!), it was gone. [Thank you dear Moderator!]

Thereby, here's a new version, a new attempt, in my original intent with that certain (now deleted) misfit of a post, which simply was to gather together some of the most unknown names, as I had the idea that they possibly might, could be easier to solve, or find, if kept in clusters (as in, maybe one could find more than one of them, when digging into a/any certain Author, and his Life, work/s and context).

Thus, here we go again ... (this time with the single ones/names excluded. I cannot understand why I had them in the former List at all. Pretty hard to gather any single name!? Just trying to be clever, I assume. Or simply over-ambitious ).

However, below is an alternative List (of the same unexplained names, as listed/attached in post #461, though, gathered together (when applicable) by Authorship:


BOURCIER, J.
evelynae as in "Trochilus evelynæ" 1847
georginae as in "Trochilus georginæ" 1847

BOURCIER, J. & M. É. MULSANT (also compare with Mulsant, below)
alice as in "Trochilus alice" 1848
mariae as in "T. [Trochilus] Mariæ" 1846


HARTLAUB, G.
emmae as in "Pratincola emmae" 1890

HARTLAUB, G. & O. FINSCH
annae as in "Psamathia annæ" 1868 (also see the present #462)


HODGSON, B. H.
acormus as in "M. [Muscicapa] acormus" 1844
Bahila as in the generic name "Bahila" 1837
maronata as in "E. [Egretta] maronata" 1844
Merva as in the generic name "Merva" 1847


HORSFIELD, T.
Timalia as in the generic name "Timalia" 1821
urica as in "Merops Urica" 1822


KOELZ , W. N.
legerli as in "Harpactes fasciatus legerli" 1939
manis as in "Homochlamys fortipes manis" 1954
melittae as in "Aethopyga gouldiae melittae" 1954
tsipi as in "Dicrurus macrocercus tsipi" 1954


LESSON, R. P.
kuru as in "Picnonotus (Kuhl.) ..., kuru, ..." 1839
neera as in "O. [Ornysmia] neera" 1839
pseudogillia as in "Platyrhynchus pseudogillia" 1839
sungu as in "Picnonotus sungu" 1839


LICHTENSTEIN, M. H. C.
impipi as in "Heliornis impipi" 1854
licua as in "Strix Licua" 1842


LINNAEUS, C. [Carl von Linné]
cela as in "[Parus] Cela" 1758
melba as in "[Fringilla] Melba" 1758
melba as in "[Hirundo] Melba" 1758
tiphia as in "[Motacilla] Tiphia" 1758
tatao as in "[Tanagra] Tatao" 1766
velia as in "[Motacilla] Velia" 1758


MULSANT, M. É., J. VERREAUX & E. VERREAUX
elvirae as in "[Zephyritis] Elviræ" 1866
Osalia as in the "S-.g." (sub-genus?) Osalia 1866


OBERHOLSER, H. C.
almae as in "Hylocichla ustulata almæ" 1898
danisa as in "Sicalis pelzelni danisa" 1931


REICHENBACH, L.
Bathilda as in the generic name "Bathilda" 1862
Eparnetes as in the generic name "Eparnetes" 1850


SALVADORI, T, & L. M. d'ALBERTIS
margarithae as in "Chalcophaps margarithae" 1875
evangelinae as in "Neochima evangelinae" 1879


SHARPE, R. B.
luciae as in "Scops luciæ" 1888
woodi as in "Mixornis Woodi" 1877


SMITH, A.
cherina as in "Drymoica cherina" 1843
codea as in "Alauda codea" 1843


SYKES, W. H.
akool as in "Rallus Akool" 1832
taigoor as in "Hemipodius Taigoor" 1832


TEMMINCK, C. J.
Anerpous as in the generic name "Anerpous" 1821
denisea as in "Columba denisea" 1830


WOLTERS, H. E.
Dorisella as in the generic name "Dorisella" 1980
Dorisornis as in the generic name "Dorisornis" 1980
dorotheae as in "Planesticus lherminieri dorotheae" 1980
magdalenae as in "Carduelis mozambica magdalenae" 1949
Rauenia as in "Rauenia gen. nov." 1980


That's them. That's all!

And Good luck, to anyone giving it a go.

/B

PS. For details and links, on either one, and their entries in the now (sadly) defunct HBW Alive Key (per 9th of May); see the the attached PDF in post #461.
..

Last edited by Calalp : Sunday 31st May 2020 at 11:14. Reason: PS.
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Old Sunday 31st May 2020, 16:54   #485
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Osalia Mulsant and Verreaux I believe is a misprint of Rosalia. In 1846 Boucier and Mulsant named O. rosae for Claudine Rosalie (Rose) Duquaire .
The types of Osalia were O. jourdanii and O. rosae.
Claudine-Rosalie Duquaire was the sister of Mulsant
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Old Sunday 31st May 2020, 18:24   #486
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Quote:
WOLTERS, H. E.
• Dorisella as in the generic name "Dorisella" 1980
• Dorisornis as in the generic name "Dorisornis" 1980
• dorotheae as in "Planesticus lherminieri dorotheae" 1980
• magdalenae as in "Carduelis mozambica magdalenae" 1949
• Rauenia as in "Rauenia gen. nov." 1980
As the first four names are from female first names I am suggesting Rauenia might be named for a female Wolters knew or was aware of possibly Rowena Ravenscroft?
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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 02:48   #487
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Bjorn, You had suggested previously

HARTLAUB, G.
• emmae as in "Pratincola emmae" 1890

Perhaps in honour of Hartlaubs daughter:

Emma Emilie Hartlaub (1860-

However you questioned her existance - I can confirm she existed:

Ancestry.com. Germany, Select Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014. indicates that she was a legitimate daughter.

I can't find a decease date but I assume once her married name is found it should be straightforward.

Also all seem to agree that

Bathilda Aloise Leonie, Comtesse de Cambaceres (1840-1861) wife of Louis Joseph Napoleon Cambacéres is the honouree in the name Bathilda so unsure why this is a query.

P

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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 04:06   #488
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Regarding Rallus akool Sykes, 1832.

Here is a suggestion from:

A Dictionary of Urdu, Classical Hindi and English (1884) by John T.Platts (here):

اکول akool or akūl (a glutton).

said here to be a word of Arabic origin no longer in use.

(the use of oo or ū seems to be a generational issue with regards to transcribing Urdu)

P
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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 06:23   #489
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PScofield View Post

Perhaps in honour of Hartlaubs daughter:

Emma Emilie Hartlaub (1860-

However you questioned her existance - I can confirm she existed:
Maybe a help to find her. Her mother was Caroline Marie Henriette née Strachow (1824-1900). They married 9. June 1844 in Bremen. A brother was Clemens Hartlaub (18. February 1858-4. February 1928). Another one was Carl.

And as you wrote similar information here on Geni. As well Gedbas is no help to solve the question.

It might make sense to look for "Bremische Biographie des 19. Jahunderts. Bremen. 1912, pp. 202-206)

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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 07:32   #490
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taphrospilus View Post
It might make sense to look for "Bremische Biographie des 19. Jahunderts. Bremen. 1912, pp. 202-206)
https://brema.suub.uni-bremen.de/con...ageview/442226
But very little / no info about children, I fear. ("Er sah allmählich eine Reihe von Kindern, dann von Enkeln und schließlich auch von Urenkeln um sich herun heranwachsen." -- not really helpful.)

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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 07:56   #491
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Wolters X 5

Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
As the first four names are from female first names I am suggesting Rauenia might be named for a female Wolters knew or was aware of ...
Mark, I wouldn't pay much attention to the fact that there are more female names left all unexplained (such is often the case), and I certainly wouldn't incl. the dedicatee behind Rauenia among the girls/ladies based only on this observation. Remember that Wolters coined loads of names (that we've managed to understand or/and explain), with a multitude of origins (not only eponyms, and certainly not only female ones). By the same logic, if we hadn't managed to find (and solve), for example/s Vauriella and Boetticherella, Mr Vaurie and Mr Boetticher would have ended up among the ladies.

This far, I'd look for a colleauge, a friend, a mentor, sponsor, artist, etc., by the name Rau, Raue, Rauen, or similar, like either one of the guys suggested in the dear old HBW (no longer) Alive Key (see the attached PDF in post 461, with the entries per 9th of May), or someone like; "... Ministerpräsident von Nordrhein-Westfalen, Johannes Rau", mentioned here ... alt. someone comletely different. Who knows?

It ought to be someone that somehow had some sort of connection to, or had some kind of influence (earlier or contemporary) on Wolters (in or pre-1980). That is, of course, if it's an Eponym at all?!

Keep digging!

/B
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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 08:01   #492
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PScofield View Post
Bjorn, You had suggested previously

HARTLAUB, G.
• emmae as in "Pratincola emmae" 1890

Perhaps in honour of Hartlaubs daughter:

Emma Emilie Hartlaub (1860-

However you questioned her existance - I can confirm she existed:

Ancestry.com. Germany, Select Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014. indicates that she was a legitimate daughter.

I can't find a decease date but I assume once her married name is found it should be straightforward.

Also all seem to agree that

Bathilda Aloise Leonie, Comtesse de Cambaceres (1840-1861) wife of Louis Joseph Napoleon Cambacéres is the honouree in the name Bathilda so unsure why this is a query.

P
Paul, re. Emma Hartlaub see post 241 (and #242). I didn't really "questioned her existance" (I'd seen her mentioned/listed earlier, like here or here), I was more puzzled of why she wasn't mentioned in Hartlaub's entry in Deutsche Biographie (as in, without a Death year, she could have died as an infant, way before 1890, when the emmae Bird was described). However, if she was still around, she could certainly be a (highly likely) candidate.

But remember that some (few) genealogist (far from all!), on either Ancestry, Geni, MyHeritage, etc., etc. [like some (ditto) 'Wikipedians' on Wiki] aren't very careful with the truth, at times adding an odd wrong person, and/or erroneous years (as we've seen countless times).

For the entry/entries of emmae and Bathilda in the (now defunct) HBW Alive Key (per 9th of May) see the attached PDF in #461. This far, without any dedications, or any other dead-certain links/connections to the bird/s in question, I think James is doing the right thing in being a bit vague, using phrases like "perphaps after ..." alt. "probably after ... ", and as such, they are each still "a query".

Keep up the Good work!

/B
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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 08:24   #493
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Here p. 497

Do we know which daughter accompanied him to Italy in 1878?

Quote:
Eine zweite Reise nach Italien unternahm er 1878 in Begleitung einer Tochter.
Maybe Emma shared his passion for birds? Or here as:

Quote:
Ein zweites Mal besuchte er 1878 mit seiner Tochter Italien, von Ravenna, Pisa, Perugia wieder bis nach Neapel.
Here p. 176 as well small pieces of his family (but no Emma).

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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 10:12   #494
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Rauenia.
Bjorn, your casual mention of President Johannes Rau, with the attachment from the Bonner Zool. Beitr., has hit the nail on the head. In my Key MS I have, after due consideration, scrapped all the other possibles and replaced them with, "Johannes Rau (1931-2006) German politician, Minister-President of North Rhine-Westphalia 1978-1998, President of Germany 1999-2004."
I also note from my records that not only did you provide a copy of the OD, but you have now provided the etymology. Many thanks.

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Old Monday 1st June 2020, 17:30   #495
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Hurray Björn and James. This seems right. And it seems more important since it will not be some dusty name on the nomenclature shelves of a closet but may be used by everyone.
From NACC 2020 B-3 a rewrite of SACC Proposal 825
Transfer White-shouldered Tanager Tachyphonus luctuosus to the genus Loriotus. [ Piacentini, Vítor Q., Unitt, Philip & Burns, Kevin J., 2019]
Comments from Areta: “YES, based on the principle of priority. It remains to be seen what SACC will do with Rauenia (for “Pipraeidea” bonariensis). I would certainly endorse Rauenia for it.”
Edward Dickinson states “[Wolters, 1980 #4263] placed this species in a new genus Rauenia; which be appropriate.” True dat it be!
H&M4 Checklist Family by Family 2020.
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Old Tuesday 2nd June 2020, 19:53   #496
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SHARPE, R. B.
• luciae as in "Scops luciæ" 1888
OD: https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/506/mode/1up .
Further written about by collector John Whitehead here on 203 and 248.
https://seasiavisions.library.cornel...ea;idno=sea280 .
John Whitehead had a sister Lucy Ashton Boosey nee Whitehead
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Old Wednesday 3rd June 2020, 08:25   #497
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Salvidori evangelinae as in "Neochima evangelinae" 1879. Salvadori's mother was Ethelyn Welby, who was English. I am sure he was aware of the poem by Longfellow Evangeline about the Acadian beauty (1847) . At the beginning of the poen the women of the town are described: Matrons and maidens sat in snow-white caps and in kirtles Scarlet and blue . The brd is beautiful and has scarlet but no snow cap. Just a guess.
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Old Wednesday 3rd June 2020, 08:39   #498
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Sharpe woodi as in "Mixornis Woodi" 1877.
This is from a bird collected by Prof. J. B. Steere in the Philipines from 1874-75. A Norman Wood was hired by Michigan University as a taxidermist in 1895. Steere worked at Michigan and I thought perhaps Wood had worked with him in the Philipines ??
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Old Wednesday 3rd June 2020, 09:35   #499
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REICHENBACH, L.
• Bathilda as in the generic name "Bathilda" 1862
No idea but as to importance this genus was taken off the shelf and reactivated by an article published this year:A comprehensive phylogeny and taxonomic evaluation of the waxbills. " Neochmia ruficauda to the genus Bathilda Reichenbach, 1862–63.
That article describes Wolters 1949 as Beiträge zur Gattungssystematik der Finkenvögel. Beitr. z. Gattungs- systematik d. Vögel, 1 (1949), pp. 3-17.
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Old Wednesday 3rd June 2020, 12:09   #500
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luciae.
Well done, Mark. I amended the Key MS entry yesterday, and it now reads, " • Lucy Ashton Boosey née Whitehead (1866-1941) sister of explorer John Whitehead and wife of music publisher Arthur Boosey (Mark Brown in litt.) (subsp. Otus spilocephalus)." I also took the opportunity to amend the jefferyi entry (John's father).
I am not sure about evangelinae and woodi however. Salvadori was not subject to the flights of fancy mooted in your evangelinae, and your Wood date seems rather late.

Last edited by James Jobling : Wednesday 3rd June 2020 at 12:22. Reason: afterthoughts
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