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Oceanic Birds of the World

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Old Wednesday 18th March 2020, 12:51   #1
Swissboy
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Oceanic Birds of the World

This is a new photo guide by Steve Howell and Kirk Zufelt: https://www.nhbs.com/oceanic-birds-of-the-world-book

It is working with photos and assemblages of single bird pictures. Thanks to peterginsburg for pointing out this fine book to me!

It is an intriguing volume with some shortcomings due to the intended compact size. Yet, there is so much stimulating stuff whether one plans for pelagic trips or not. I very much love the wealth of fine photos, but at times printing quality does not show particular features very well. A case in point is the waving pattern on the Waved(Galapagos) Albatross, but also the blue color of the feet of the Blue-footed Booby. Most species, it seems have only a range description, no map. But then, there are many comparative range maps, and with this we come to the most fascinating part of this new book. Its strength is the way several species (groups) are compared, but also combining various views of the same species. And there are many instances where one realizes that these marine species are still a group full of unknowns and riddles. Be that their life histories or their systematics. Of course, the wide variety can be more than just a bit bewildering. But many things that had puzzled me in other books neatly fall into place in this one, such as how various related species fit together geographically. I have only just leafed through with a few more intensive quick glances. But it is obvious that this will become one of my most intensively studied books whether my planned Antarctic tour will be cancelled for "Corona" reasons or not.
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Old Wednesday 18th March 2020, 20:39   #2
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Quick-Find Index to this book

The book actually has a very good index, but I prefer a more concise one for certain occasions. It brings you directly to the beginning of a chapter. Again, it is here for everybody to use if you so desire. No claim of copyright on my part. You need to trim it after printing. It then fits on the inside covers.

One correction to the index in the book: The term Gannet (from the second Fulmar line) should go in front of the next line that starts now with Australasian.
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File Type: doc OCEANIC BIRDS of the WORLD QUICK-FIND INDEX.doc (30.5 KB, 15 views)
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Old Wednesday 25th March 2020, 04:18   #3
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Recently had the pleasure of putting this book to use - it is, in my view, by far the best overall guide to Tubenoses and other oceanic species. Add in Robert Flood’s Atlantic guides and the “Petrels Night and Day” guide and you a set of the best modern guides. Just a shame the southern Oceans, Pacific and Indian don’t have regional guides of the quality the N Atlantic does!
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Old Thursday 26th March 2020, 05:58   #4
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Recently had the pleasure of putting this book to use - it is, in my view, by far the best overall guide to Tubenoses and other oceanic species. Add in Robert Flood’s Atlantic guides and the “Petrels Night and Day” guide and you a set of the best modern guides. Just a shame the southern Oceans, Pacific and Indian don’t have regional guides of the quality the N Atlantic does!
Just managed to pick this up on your recommendation, hadn't bothered before. I suspect the reason I hadn't bothered, was the format, it's one of those annoyingly shaped books that makes my OCD itch, why do they do this?

They're going for a minimum of £50 online, many are asking a great deal more but I got one from Wildsounds for the original price of £35, not sure if he has any left but worth a try for any that want it.
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Old Thursday 26th March 2020, 07:40   #5
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"Petrels Night and Day" is available for free here, as are the rest of the Sound Approach books: https://soundapproach.co.uk/petrels-night-day/

But I would still buy it if you get the chance, it really is one of the very best bird books of the last 10-15 years, and an exceptionally fascinating read!
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Old Thursday 26th March 2020, 10:02   #6
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"Petrels Night and Day" is available for free here, as are the rest of the Sound Approach books: https://soundapproach.co.uk/petrels-night-day/

But I would still buy it if you get the chance, it really is one of the very best bird books of the last 10-15 years, and an exceptionally fascinating read!
I can't download it, link only goes to a summary page, there is no active download link that I can see?

It's a subscription service but I've ordered the book anyway.
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Old Thursday 26th March 2020, 15:26   #7
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I had also not bought the Petrels Night and Day in the past for a few reasons - hard to come by, expensive, and didn't think I'd be back in the N Atlantic soon. With an upcoming move back to Europe, I have been pondering picking up a copy. Great to know that the material is online, but I'll still go for a paper copy when/if I can get my hands on one.

In the meanwhile, not many seabirds to be seen out the window!
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Old Friday 27th March 2020, 18:38   #8
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[quote=andyadcock;3975213]I can't download it, link only goes to a summary page, there is no active download link that I can see?

It says "read the full species account by taking out an annual subscription to the Sound Approach", but I can access them anyway by clicking on the individual species' names, and I'm not subscribed to the Sound Approach as far as I know.

As of a few months ago - last time I checked before today - you could access everything without any mention of a subscription
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Old Saturday 28th March 2020, 09:50   #9
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Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Just managed to pick this up on your recommendation, hadn't bothered before. I suspect the reason I hadn't bothered, was the format, it's one of those annoyingly shaped books that makes my OCD itch, why do they do this?

They're going for a minimum of £50 online, many are asking a great deal more but I got one from Wildsounds for the original price of £35, not sure if he has any left but worth a try for any that want it.
Hopefully once you have a copy Andy you will see how much better the sonograms look in that landscape format.
Still remain some of my favourite books, not just because i lived in Poole for a long time, and can't wait for the next book in a few months, that's all about birds in the Maghreb by Arnoud van den Berg et al.
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Old Saturday 28th March 2020, 13:54   #10
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Hopefully once you have a copy Andy you will see how much better the sonograms look in that landscape format.
Still remain some of my favourite books, not just because i lived in Poole for a long time, and can't wait for the next book in a few months, that's all about birds in the Maghreb by Arnoud van den Berg et al.
Cheers
James

I see what you mean but book collectors really dislike these odd shapes. They could easily have provided the sonograms in a seperat booklet or other insert?
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Old Sunday 29th March 2020, 11:32   #11
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Originally Posted by Swissboy View Post
This is a new photo guide by Steve Howell and Kirk Zufelt: https://www.nhbs.com/oceanic-birds-of-the-world-book

It is working with photos and assemblages of single bird pictures. Thanks to peterginsburg for pointing out this fine book to me!

It is an intriguing volume with some shortcomings due to the intended compact size. Yet, there is so much stimulating stuff whether one plans for pelagic trips or not. I very much love the wealth of fine photos, but at times printing quality does not show particular features very well. A case in point is the waving pattern on the Waved(Galapagos) Albatross, but also the blue color of the feet of the Blue-footed Booby. Most species, it seems have only a range description, no map. But then, there are many comparative range maps, and with this we come to the most fascinating part of this new book. Its strength is the way several species (groups) are compared, but also combining various views of the same species. And there are many instances where one realizes that these marine species are still a group full of unknowns and riddles. Be that their life histories or their systematics. Of course, the wide variety can be more than just a bit bewildering. But many things that had puzzled me in other books neatly fall into place in this one, such as how various related species fit together geographically. I have only just leafed through with a few more intensive quick glances. But it is obvious that this will become one of my most intensively studied books whether my planned Antarctic tour will be cancelled for "Corona" reasons or not.
I had the good fortune to use this book in the open seas of Eastern Polynesia, last year for five weeks and found it to be absolutely outstanding, and superseded all the other field guides we had on-board.

The taxonomy is quite 'progressive', though I'm no expert when it comes to seabirds, so no idea on the justification for many of the proposed splits, and English names. But, as far as an identification guide, thrilled to have had it on-board, we simply wouldn't have been able to put a name on some of the individuals we saw by using some field guides.

James
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Old Sunday 29th March 2020, 15:24   #12
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I had the good fortune to use this book in the open seas of Eastern Polynesia, last week for five weeks and found it to be absolutely outstanding, and superseded all the other field guides we had on-board.

The taxonomy is quite 'progressive', though I'm no expert when it comes to seabirds, so no idea on the justification for many of the proposed splits, and English names. But, as far as an identification guide, thrilled to have had it on-board, we simply wouldn't have been able to put a name on some of the individuals we saw by using some field guides.

James
How does that work then, you bought a TARDIS?
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Old Yesterday, 01:49   #13
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How does that work then, you bought a TARDIS?
Funnily enough I had to google that!
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Old Yesterday, 06:07   #14
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Funnily enough I had to google that!
Surely not too young for Dr Who or just never watched it?
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