Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

The Easy View

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 21:32   #1
Lightbender
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019
 
Lightbender's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Hamburg
Posts: 41
The Easy View

What binoculars (8x or 10x) have the most EASY and stress free view? Any opinions?
Lightbender is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 22:13   #2
Samolot
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Boston
Posts: 120
In my opinion, the larger the exit pupil, the easier the view. However, the larger the binocular, the heavier it is and thus prone to more shaking which defeats any easier-view. Having said that, there have been some binoculars I have had that have had surprisingly easy views despite smaller exit pupils.

1) Nikon EII 8x30 - easy eye placement and wiiiide field of view.
2) Swaro EL 8x32 - large eye cups relative to the size of the objectives offers a surprisingly "walk-in" view. Surprising low amount of black-outs and kidney beans as my eye roams around the image.

The EII's have a wide porro shape offering more stable hand-holding and thus easier view. The Swaro EL 8x32 also offers steady views with its lightweight and relative wide field of view.

Honorable Mention:

Leica UVHD+ 7x42. I don't think there will be much debate here. Huge exit pupil, pristine ergonomics.

Excited to hear others' opinions!
Samolot is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 22:24   #3
jring
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,975
Hi,

for me that would be a good pair of 7x42 due to the large exit pupil and depth of field. If that's not an option, a nice 8x42 will do too. 10x is for special cases in my opinion - you need to refocus quite a lot.

Joacim
jring is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 22:58   #4
etudiant
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019

 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 4,290
Quote:
Originally Posted by jring View Post
Hi,

for me that would be a good pair of 7x42 due to the large exit pupil and depth of field. If that's not an option, a nice 8x42 will do too. 10x is for special cases in my opinion - you need to refocus quite a lot.

Joacim
Small DoF is actually advantageous when trying to focus on a bird deep in the vegetation. It is wonderful to have the nearer foliage melt away as the bird comes into focus. Frequent refocusing seems a reasonable tradeoff.
etudiant is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 23:06   #5
jgraider
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: West Texas
Posts: 1,298
A Swaro 10x50 SV with winged eyecups......phenomenal views without peer, IMHO.
jgraider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 23:12   #6
mwhogue
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019

 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Friendswood
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by jring View Post
Hi,

for me that would be a good pair of 7x42 due to the large exit pupil and depth of field. If that's not an option, a nice 8x42 will do too. 10x is for special cases in my opinion - you need to refocus quite a lot.

Joacim
Joacim,

I agree, since Lightbender is asking about which "has the most easy and stress free view" that's a good 7x42 IMO.

I have bins in 5, 6, 7, 8, 8.5, 9, 10, 10.5, 12, 14 and 15. All are good for different uses but 7x42 is easiest, least stressful view.
Mike
mwhogue is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Saturday 18th May 2019, 23:34   #7
[email protected]
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,857
I think the Swarovski SV's offer an easy and stress free view for a roof because of the high quality optics and the easy walk-in view. I would also have to say porro's like the Nikon EII and Swarovski Habicht also do because of the simplicity of the optical design. When I look through a good porro I can just tell that it is a simpler optical train than a roof without all the field flatteners and phase coatings. Big exit pupil binoculars with lower or moderate magnification like a 7x42 or 8x56 do too because of the easy eye placement and the simple fact that is easier to hold them steady and they have greater DOF so you are not focusing all the time. The better the quality of the optics the easier and more stress free the view is.

Last edited by [email protected] : Saturday 18th May 2019 at 23:44.
denco@comcast.n is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 01:01   #8
Chosun Juan
Given to Fly
 
Chosun Juan's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Central West NSW, Australia
Posts: 5,744
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightbender View Post
What binoculars (8x or 10x) has the most EASY and stress free view? Any opinions?
The one that suits YOU best !

You might want to investigate Swarovski's SV product range for their excellent randpupille design to see if one really grabs you.




Chosun
Chosun Juan is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2016 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 02:02   #9
eronald
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Paris
Posts: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightbender View Post
What binoculars (8x or 10x) has the most EASY and stress free view? Any opinions?
I have a Leica 7x42 UV HD. i think the Zeiss SF 8x42 is even more pleasant. Although it shouldn't be.

Edmund
eronald is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 07:32   #10
Troubador
Moderator
 
Troubador's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 9,084
7x42 format. In my case that means a Meopta MeoStar B1 7x42, but I have tried Leica Uvid and Zeiss FL and they both had the same ease of view.

Lee
Troubador is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 08:19   #11
fazalmajid
Registered User
 
fazalmajid's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samolot View Post
1) Nikon EII 8x30 - easy eye placement and wiiiide field of view.
On the contrary, I find the exaggerated parallax of the EII very unsettling.
fazalmajid is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 09:18   #12
Kevin Conville
yardbirder
BF Supporter 2019
 
Kevin Conville's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: State of Chaos
Posts: 2,112
Quote:
Originally Posted by fazalmajid View Post
On the contrary, I find the exaggerated parallax of the EII very unsettling.
I don't know about unsettling but the parallax issue becomes real for me at close distance for sure.

Clearly EIIs have their following. I had a pair for a year.

I didn't like the way they hung from a neck strap. The objectives want to tilt in toward the chest.

I found the focus slow, and for birding this wasn't my favorite.

I use a thumbs up grip and short, wide porros don't hold particularly well this way.

The lack of water/dust proofing never was a problem but I found I didn't take/use them where I would any of my roofs. I tended to baby them. No armor didn't help here either.

Good optics are the only thing I can get excited about.
As far as ease of view, I didn't find them especially forgiving though I had no problems either.

One (of several) reasons I use a thumbs up grip is the shielding from light at the eyepieces this grip affords. This is made more difficult by the EIIs ergos. From that point of view, they are less user friendly than almost any roof prism bin, IMO.
__________________
my bird pics

Scott's Miracle Grow KILLING Birds, for Years!
read this: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=226714

Last edited by Kevin Conville : Sunday 19th May 2019 at 09:30.
Kevin Conville is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 09:39   #13
wllmspd
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Hampton
Posts: 227
For light shielding I use a set of bino bandits, been a permanent part of my 8x30E2 since I bought them, eliminates the world around so you can get on with studying the scene. They could fog up in extreme conditions, but you can easily fold them up if that happens. A wide field helps maintain awareness of what’s going on.

Peter
wllmspd is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 10:31   #14
Tringa45
Registered User

 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Cologne, Germany
Posts: 260
Quote:
Originally Posted by etudiant View Post
Small DoF is actually advantageous when trying to focus on a bird deep in the vegetation. It is wonderful to have the nearer foliage melt away as the bird comes into focus. Frequent refocusing seems a reasonable tradeoff.
That and the larger image size may be more satisfying IF you get on the bird, but searching for it in the third dimension with a reduced field of view (low DOF = higher magnification = lower FOV) is not going to help. Don't think I'm going to be taking my scope into the woods!

As already mentioned, large exit pupil and adequate eye relief are positive factors but spherical aberration of the exit pupil (Nikon SE?) can be a killer.
I second Chosun's mention of "Randpupille" as a positive factor in ease of view.
If you hold a binocular at arm's length and turn it, the exit pupil on many is lentil shaped before it occludes. Much better is a gibbous moon shape as seen with my 10x42 EL SV and old 7x42 SLC. This however entails larger (and heavier) prisms.

John
Tringa45 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 13:06   #15
ceasar
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: NE Pennsylvania
Posts: 11,784
My little Swarovski CL Companion 8x30 B with the "optical box" designed into its oculars has the easiest view of any binocular that I have ever used.

Bob
ceasar is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2010 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 16:03   #16
14Goudvink
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: The Hague
Posts: 448
+1 for the Nikon 8x30 E2.

For me an easier view than the Leica Ultravid 7x42 I and the Swaro 8x32 SV. I owned both for about two years. Ergonomics play an important part in getting an easy view.

George
14Goudvink is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 21:03   #17
jring
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,975
Quote:
Originally Posted by etudiant View Post
Small DoF is actually advantageous when trying to focus on a bird deep in the vegetation. It is wonderful to have the nearer foliage melt away as the bird comes into focus. Frequent refocusing seems a reasonable tradeoff.
Arguably yes, if you're searching in foilage, but I very often use bins to look over the river from my balcony and there a large DOF is much preferred...

Joachim
jring is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 21:32   #18
WJC
Registered User
 
WJC's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Twin Falls, Idaho
Posts: 2,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by fazalmajid View Post
On the contrary, I find the exaggerated parallax of the EII very unsettling.
I'm not familiar with "exaggerated parallax." Could you please break that down for me?

Bill
__________________
“Socialism only works in two places ... Heaven, where they don't need it and Hell, where they already have it.” — Ronald Reagan
WJC is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 21:44   #19
iveljay
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wiltshire, England
Posts: 901
Of the EIIs I find the 10x35 more pleasant than the 8x, it feels more balanced with longer objective tubes, so comes into second place.

The FL 8x32 is probably the most relaxing overall as I can operate them on 'autopilot' no though required, so is no. 1.

The FL 7x42 is relaxing until the external ribbing starts to annoy me - for some reason the 8x32's ribbing doeasn't register.

Big eyecups are a definite no no, my bone structure means they are a long way from my eyes so unless I use eye shields I am looking round the side of the binocular when centred on the eyepieces. Pity as it cuts down on my choices. The protection was probably useful when my ancesters were lurking in caves!
iveljay is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 19th May 2019, 22:33   #20
[email protected]
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,857
Quote:
Originally Posted by iveljay View Post
Of the EIIs I find the 10x35 more pleasant than the 8x, it feels more balanced with longer objective tubes, so comes into second place.

The FL 8x32 is probably the most relaxing overall as I can operate them on 'autopilot' no though required, so is no. 1.

The FL 7x42 is relaxing until the external ribbing starts to annoy me - for some reason the 8x32's ribbing doeasn't register.

Big eyecups are a definite no no, my bone structure means they are a long way from my eyes so unless I use eye shields I am looking round the side of the binocular when centred on the eyepieces. Pity as it cuts down on my choices. The protection was probably useful when my ancesters were lurking in caves!
I was thinking more in terms of optics when the question was put forth. But ergonomics like balance and how the eye cups fit are also important factors in how easy and stress free the binocular is to use also.

Last edited by [email protected] : Monday 20th May 2019 at 13:16.
denco@comcast.n is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 20th May 2019, 01:03   #21
dries1
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019
 
dries1's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Delaware
Posts: 1,545
If one does not wear glasses, I would agree with Samolot about the EII, and I am sure the EL SV 8X32 is great also, just have not spent much time behind one. If the conditions are right, the light-weight 10X35 EII can provide that easy view also.

Andy W.
dries1 is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 20th May 2019, 20:43   #22
bonesmalones
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 84
I have the Nikon EII 8x30 and it is an easy view. I also have Kowa 8.5x44 Genesis XD and those are an easy view as well just not as wide as the Nikon.
bonesmalones is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 20th May 2019, 23:17   #23
chill6x6
Registered User
BF Supporter 2019
 
chill6x6's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Alabama
Posts: 1,397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightbender View Post
What binoculars (8x or 10x) has the most EASY and stress free view? Any opinions?
That's kind of a vague question... I don't use a binocular that's NOT an easy, stress-free view. I can tell you a few binoculars that I believe that the vast majority of users will find easy to use and are easy to get used to. Personally, I'll pick 7X42s as mentioned above. A large FOV and exit pupil covers up a lot of user sins.

7X42 Leica Ultravid- I have the HD+ model. VERY easy to use and when I lend it out it's hard to get back. Smooth/easy adjustments.

7X42 B.1 Meopta Meostar- again VERY easy to use and a repeat of the above.

7X42 Opticron Discovery WP PC- much less expensive than the above view but very easy to use.
__________________
Chuck
chill6x6 is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2017 2018 2019 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 03:55   #24
WJC
Registered User
 
WJC's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Twin Falls, Idaho
Posts: 2,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightbender View Post
What binoculars (8x or 10x) has the most EASY and stress free view? Any opinions?
The keys to “easy / stress-free” viewing, at ANY magnification, do not relate to ANY brand or model:

1. Be sure the bino is collimated—NOT conditionally aligned.
2. Focus by STARING and let the bino’s focus mechanism do its job. People who refuse to know any better continually dance around this one. Thus, they continually have something to chat about on bino forums. Many incredibly important things seem too simple to be bothered with. One could just LOOK upon the brass serpent and live. Fiery serpents ... scads; know-it-alls ... 0.
3. Be sure the eye relief is adequate and appropriate for your facial characteristics.
4. Do not try to use a bino without a tripod that’s to heavy for you or has poor ergonomics.
5. Don’t waste time worry about those bloody numerals. Just focus the binocular and enjoy. When distance to your target changes ... refocus. And if you have bought into all that fraudulent “auto-focus” crap. Please let me know. I have some lovely ocean-front property just northwest of Wichita on which I could make you such a deal!

Bill
__________________
“Socialism only works in two places ... Heaven, where they don't need it and Hell, where they already have it.” — Ronald Reagan
WJC is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 21st May 2019, 06:28   #25
PeterPS
Registered User

 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Stanford and Uppsala
Posts: 700
Quote:
Originally Posted by WJC View Post
I'm not familiar with "exaggerated parallax." Could you please break that down for me?

Bill
Bill,

Porros have a significantly larger distance between the objective lenses than your IPD. Consequently, a nearby object has a larger parallax when viewed thru a porro than when viewed thru a roof of the same magnification (for distant objects the difference in parallax is insignificant). This larger parallax makes nearby objects seem visibly smaller when viewed thru a porro (such as your SE 8x32). Btw, while I love the SEs I don't use mine much because of this parallax effect.

Peter
PeterPS is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for something with a wide view and easy to hold coopershawk Binoculars 13 Sunday 11th December 2016 12:15
Best eyecups and Easy View? hawken 12 Binoculars 11 Tuesday 11th September 2012 08:45
Easy Woodchat Shrike - but is easy fun? ChinaBirds Your Birding Day 16 Monday 8th May 2006 15:03
easy one? Surreybirder Bird Forum Fun Quizzes 10 Monday 2nd May 2005 12:41

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.22532797 seconds with 40 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 23:23.