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Anatidae

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Old Wednesday 19th July 2017, 05:34   #151
mb1848
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A draft proposal to AOU NACC:
Change of genus Sibirionetta to Eunetta because of priority:
Sibirionetta is dated from 1929 with Baikal teal as type. (Nettion formosum) but Bonaparte made Baikal Teal the type species of Eunetta in 1856.
Neither Falcated Teal nor Baikal Teal were listed in the first three Check-list of North American Birds. In the Fourth Edition of the Check-list (1931) “Eunatta Bonaparte, Comptes Rendus Acad. Sci. (Paris) XIII, No. 13 (for Sept. 29), 1856, p. 650. Type, by monotypy, Anas falcate Georgi.” Baikal Teal is listed as Nettion formosum on the next page. In the Nineteenth Supplement from a 1944 Auk page 443 Eunetta was merged into Anas. It cited Birds of the World vol. 1 1931 James Peters who says of Anas “The only other alternative is to break it up into a large number of genera and subgenera each one monotypic”. In this month’s Auk Genus SIBIRIONETTA Boetticher
Sibirionetta Boetticher, 1929, Anz. Orn. Ges. Bayern 2: 11. Type, by original designation, Anas formosa, Georgi.
Also in this month’s Auk the committee put Eunetta as a synonym of Mareca:
Genus MARECA Stephens
Mareca Stephens, 1824, in Shaw, Gen. Zool. 12(2): 130.
Type, by subsequent designation (Eyton, 1838),
Mareca fistularis Stephens Anas penelope Lin-
naeus.
Chaulelasmus ‘‘G. R. Gray’’ Bonaparte, 1838, Geogr.
Comp. List, p. 56. Type, by monotypy, Anas strepera
Linnaeus.
Eunetta Bonaparte, 1856, Compte Rendus Acad. Sci.
Paris 43: 650. Type, by monotypy, Anas falcata
Georgi

The committee also informed: Take Eunetta out of the synonymy from Anas.
Eunetta Bonaparte 1856.
Bonaparte CL. 1856. Excursion dans les divers musées d'Allemagne, de Hollande et de Belgique (suite et fin), et Tableaux paralléliques de l'ordre des Palmipèdes. C.-R. Séan. Hebd. Acad. Sci. Paris 43:643-652.; p. 650; [OD]
Originally included nominal species: Anas falcata "Pallas" = Georgi 1775, Anas formosa Georgi 1775, Anas bimaculata "Penn." = Keyserling & Blasius 1840.
Type fixation: subsequent designation...

Would anybody know on which account this name is used for the Falcated Duck? The AOU check-list, as far back as I can trace ([1931]), always made this a type fixation by monotypy, but this is obviously not correct. The Richmond index has three cards for this name:
• The [first one] indicates (correctly) that Bonaparte originally included falcata Pall., formosaGeorgi, and bimaculata "Penn.", noting about falcata:
Quote:
On p. 1025, he says this "n'est pas le type de mon Eunetta."
• The [second one] corrects the authorship of falcata to Georgi and that of bimaculata to Keyserling & Blasius, which are the accepted sources for these names, and notes:
Quote:
subsequently restricted to A. formosa Georgi, by Bonaparte, op. cit., p. 1025.
• The [third one] intimates that the genotype is Eunetta falcata (Georgi) without explanation.
True, writing that something is not the type of a genus, or subsequently restricting a genus to a single species, doesn't amount to a type designation. But what Bonaparte wrote on [p. 1025] is actually only partly quoted in the Richmond index; the full text reads:
Quote:
Anas falcata n'est pas le type de mon genre Eunetta : il est bon de le dire pour ceux qui prétendent que la première espèce énumérée doit être considérée comme telle. Sauf les filets de la queue, ce beau Canard se rapproche bien plus d'Anas acuta que de A. formosa, véritable type du genre tenant de plus prés aux Sarcelles.
= "Anas falcata is not the type of my genus Eunetta : it is good to say it for those who pretend that the first species listed must be considered as such. Except the tail streamers, this nice Duck approaches Anas acuta much more than A. formosa, true type of the genus which is closer to the Teals." (My translation.)
If there is a way to disregard the last sentence, as if it did not constitute a valid type designation, it currently escapes me. Sibirionetta is a junior synonym of Eunetta unless there is another acceptable type fixation than Bonaparte's designation, it could be, yes.
(One possibility to consider, perhaps: given how it is worded, it's not completely unthinkable that Bonaparte's text might be a reaction to someone else having treated falcata as the type; and of course if this hypothetical 'someone else' published it, this might constitute a valid type designation. Caveats: it's a lot of 'if's, I have not seen any such designation, only a couple of months would have been available between the OD and Bonaparte's designation to publish it, and I find no indication that the usual treatment is based on this type of thing.) Degland in 1867 says that formosa is "Type du genre Eunetta" .
Page 523 of https://books.google.com/books?id=Yg...gbs_navlinks_s . Bonaparte named the White-winged Scoter for Degland.
Instead of Sibirionetta the AOU should use Eunetta for Baikal Teal : Eunatta Bonaparte, Comptes Rendus Acad. Sci. (Paris) XXXXIII, (for Sept. 29), 1856, p. 650, (for 24 Nov.) 1856 p. 1025. Type, by subsequent designation, Anas formosa Georgi.
Literature cited:
AOU Fourth Ed. Check-list of North American Birds
AOU 19th and 58th Supplement to Check-list
Comptes Rendus Acad. Sci. (Paris) XXXXIII, 1856 .
Anz. Orn. Ges. Bayern 2: 11 1929.
July 18, 2017
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Laurent Raty

Laurent I do not know your affiliation.
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Last edited by mb1848 : Wednesday 19th July 2017 at 05:39.
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Old Sunday 30th July 2017, 09:17   #152
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The draft version of IOC 7.3 can be found here

The new sequence of ducks is indeed Sibirionetta, Spatula, Mareca, Anas, with some rearrangements made within those families
Sibirionetta
formosa
Spatula
querquedula
hottentota
puna
versicolor
platalea
cyanoptera
discors
smithii
rhynchotis
clypeata
Mareca
strepera
falcata
penelope
sibilatrix
americana
marecula ††
Anas
sparsa
undulata
melleri
superciliosa
laysanensis
wyvilliana
luzonica
poecilorhyncha
zonorhyncha
platyrhynchos
fulvigula
rubripes
diazi
capensis
bahamensis
erythrorhyncha
georgica
eatoni
acuta
crecca
carolinensis
flavirostris
andium
gibberifrons
albogularis
theodori ††
gracilis
castanea
bernieri
chlorotis
aucklandica
nesiotis
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Old Wednesday 23rd August 2017, 14:08   #153
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Anserini - True geese

Ottenburghs, Megens, Kraus, van Hooft, van Wieren, Crooijmans, Ydenberg, Groenen, Prins. 2017. A history of hybrids? Genomic patterns of introgression in the True Geese. BMC Evol Biol, 17:201.
[whole paper]
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Old Wednesday 8th November 2017, 17:42   #154
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Warzecha J., Fornal A., Oczkowicz M., Bugno-Poniewierska M. A molecular characteristic of the Anatidae mitochondrial control region – a review. Annals of Animal Science, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/aoas-2017-0016.
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Old Saturday 11th November 2017, 10:42   #155
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
Ottenburghs, Megens, Kraus, van Hooft, van Wieren, Crooijmans, Ydenberg, Groenen, Prins. 2017. A history of hybrids? Genomic patterns of introgression in the True Geese. BMC Evol Biol, 17:201.
[whole paper]
This paper is the third one of my work on hybridization in geese. Here is an overview that a posted on my blog some weeks ago.
https://avianhybrids.wordpress.com/2...ogy-of-papers/
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Old Saturday 11th November 2017, 15:39   #156
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Jente thank you for posting I love figure 2 of your blog. I once diagnosed a bird at a local city park pond as a hybrid of Ross's Goose and Swan Goose. Your figure 2 helps explain how that might have happened. The Ross's had a damaged wing. I empathise with the true geese because I have my own history of "wrong mate choice".
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Old Wednesday 13th December 2017, 11:02   #157
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Chendytes and Camptorhynchus

Janet C. Buckner, Ryan Ellingson, David A. Gold, Terry L. Jones, David K. Jacobs. Mitogenomics supports an unexpected taxonomic relationship for the extinct diving duck Chendytes lawi and definitively places the extinct Labrador Duck. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 13 December 2017.

Abstract:

Chendytes lawi, an extinct flightless diving anseriform from coastal California, was traditionally classified as a sea duck, tribe Mergini, based on similarities in osteological characters. We recover and analyze mitochondrial genomes of C. lawi and five additional Mergini species, including the extinct Labrador Duck, Camptorhyncus labradorius. Despite its diving morphology, C. lawi is reconstructed as an ancient relictual lineage basal to the dabbling ducks (tribe Anatini), revealing an additional example of convergent evolution of characters related to feeding behavior among ducks. The Labrador Duck is sister to Steller’s Eider which may provide insights into the evolution and ecology of this poorly known extinct species. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of full length mitogenomes, from taxonomically distributed ancient and modern sources can improve phylogeny reconstruction of groups previously assessed with shorter single-gene mitochondrial sequences.
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Old Wednesday 13th December 2017, 16:42   #158
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Note that Lophodytes cucullatus is clearly embedded within Mergus. In fact , there are very few difference between these two genera , we can suggest their synonymization

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Old Wednesday 13th December 2017, 20:59   #159
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The Labrador Duck genus is Camptorhynchus not Camptorhyncus. 14th AOU Check-list:
“The name Camptorhynchus was first published by Bonaparte, whose work has priority over Eyton's 'Monograph of the Anatidse' (where the name appears as Kamptorhynchus)”
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/70/mode/1up .
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/97/mode/1up .
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Old Wednesday 13th December 2017, 21:51   #160
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The Labrador Duck genus is Camptorhynchus not Camptorhyncus.
Both spellings are used in the article.
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Old Thursday 14th December 2017, 05:54   #161
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Maybe it's just a typo
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Old Thursday 14th December 2017, 08:42   #162
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Maybe it's just a typo
I’m guessing so, since there are multiple misspellings of Steller’s Eider (”Stellar’s”).
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Old Tuesday 13th February 2018, 18:08   #163
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Anas flavirostris

Graham, Lavretsky, Muñoz-Fuentes, Green, Wilson, McCracken. 2018. Migration-selection balance drives genetic differentiation in genes associated with high-altitude function in the Speckled Teal (Anas flavirostris) in the Andes. Genome Biol. Evol. 10:14–32.
[whole paper]
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Old Sunday 18th February 2018, 06:42   #164
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Eurasian wigeon deviation in wing pattern

This may not fit in perfectly here, but I don't know where else to put it, and given the fact that the contributors in this thread are highly interested in ducks and geese I might have a chance to get a qualified input to the issue here.
I shot the male wigeon in Denmark in December 2017 with the extra black bar on the wing (the right hand wing).
Wonder if anybody has seen this before? I never have, but got the idea that it could be a special feature in a part population somewhere. Any comment will be welcome.

By the way, I can't open the link that opens the thread here as it needs a pass word !
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Old Sunday 18th February 2018, 07:05   #165
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Originally Posted by njh55 View Post
This may not fit in perfectly here, but I don't know where else to put it, and given the fact that the contributors in this thread are highly interested in ducks and geese I might have a chance to get a qualified input to the issue here.
I shot the male wigeon in Denmark in December 2017 with the extra black bar on the wing (the right hand wing).
Wonder if anybody has seen this before? I never have, but got the idea that it could be a special feature in a part population somewhere. Any comment will be welcome.

By the way, I can't open the link that opens the thread here as it needs a pass word !
Here, you are in the "taxonomy" section , not sure there is a "Hunting" section on this website.
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Old Sunday 18th February 2018, 10:54   #166
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I am not looking for a "hunting forum" - I am just trying to find out, whether this unusual wing is a random mutation or is typical of some part population somewhere. Please tell me if there should be a better forum in here to get an answer. I just thought taxonomy would be the closest I could get to get an answer as it has a lot to do with plumage.
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Old Sunday 18th February 2018, 11:05   #167
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Okidoki. I'll try to find the answer
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Old Sunday 18th February 2018, 16:00   #168
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njh55 View Post
I am not looking for a "hunting forum" - I am just trying to find out, whether this unusual wing is a random mutation or is typical of some part population somewhere. Please tell me if there should be a better forum in here to get an answer. I just thought taxonomy would be the closest I could get to get an answer as it has a lot to do with plumage.
According to some friends "immature first year" (immature de première année, in French in the text) but I don't know the equivalent English term.
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Old Thursday 19th April 2018, 19:24   #169
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Proposal (787) to SACC

Revise the generic classification and linear sequence of Anas
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Old Thursday 7th June 2018, 08:23   #170
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Ruddy Duck

Lozano-Jaramillo M., McCracken K.G. & Cadena C.D., in press. Neutral and functionally important genes shed light on phylogeography and the history of high-altitude colonization in a widespread New World duck. Ecol. Evol.

Here
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Old Thursday 21st June 2018, 19:07   #171
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Proposal (787) to SACC

Revise the generic classification and linear sequence of Anas
PASSED (21 June 2018)
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Old Thursday 9th May 2019, 05:14   #172
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Sarkidiornis sylvicola

Proposal (825) to SACC

Treat Sarkidiornis sylvicola as a separate species from Sarkidiornis melanotos
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Old Wednesday 10th July 2019, 20:35   #173
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Lavretsky P, DaCosta JM, Sorenson MD, McCracken KG, Peters JL. ddRAD‐seq data reveal significant genome‐wide population structure and divergent genomic regions that distinguish the mallard and close relatives in North America. Mol Ecol. 2019;28:2594–2609. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.15091

Abstract:

Recently evolved species typically share genetic variation across their genomes due to incomplete lineage sorting and/or ongoing gene flow. Given only subtle allele frequency differences at most loci and the expectation that divergent selection may affect only a tiny fraction of the genome, distinguishing closely related species based on multi‐locus data requires substantial genomic coverage. In this study, we used ddRAD‐seq to sample the genomes of five recently diverged, New World “mallards” (Anas spp.), a group of dabbling duck species characterized by diagnosable phenotypic differences but minimal genetic differentiation. With increased genomic sampling, we aimed to characterize population structure within this group and identify genomic regions that may have experienced divergent selection during speciation. We analyzed 3,017 autosomal ddRAD‐seq loci and 177 loci from the Z‐chromosome. In contrast to previous studies, the ddRAD‐seq data were sufficient to assign individuals to their respective species or subspecies and to generate estimates of gene flow in a phylogenetic framework. We find limited evidence of contemporary gene flow between the dichromatic mallard and several monochromatic taxa, but find evidence for historical gene flow between some monochromatic species pairs. We conclude that the overall genetic similarity of these taxa likely reflects retained ancestral polymorphism rather than recent and extensive gene flow. Thus, despite recurring cases of hybridization in this group, our results challenge the current dogma predicting the genetic extinction of the New World monochromatic dabbling ducks via introgressive hybridization with mallards. Moreover, ddRAD‐seq data were sufficient to identify previously unknown outlier regions across the Z‐chromosome and several autosomal chromosomes that may have been involved in the diversification of species in this recent radiation.
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