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Turdidae

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Old Thursday 23rd August 2018, 17:39   #26
Peter Kovalik
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Zoothera spp

Jason T. Weir. Description of the song of the Nilgiri Thrush (Zoothera [aurea] neilgherriensis) and song differentiation across the Zoothera dauma species complex. Avian Research, 2018 9:28.

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Old Sunday 17th February 2019, 13:36   #27
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Turdus thrushes

Jenő Nagy, Zsolt Végvári & Zoltán Varga. Phylogeny, migration and life history: flling the gaps in the origin and biogeography of the Turdus thrushes.
Journal of Ornithology (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-019-01632-3

Abstract:

Although the biogeographic history of thrushes (Turdidae) has been extensively studied, a concise discussion of this topic is still lacking. Therefore, in this study we aimed to investigate: (1) the evolutionary origin of the migratory behaviour of the Turdus thrushes in a biogeographic context including (2) trans-Atlantic dispersal events, (3) possible colonization routes into the Nearctic, and (4) relationships among life history traits, ecological factors, and migratory strategies within the most comprehensive taxon set of 72 Turdus thrushes to date. We estimated the ancestral ranges of the studied species, primarily by comparing main biogeographic models (dispersal-vicariance, dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis, BayArea models), and performed phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses to identify relationships among distribution patterns, diet, body measurements, clutch size, and migratory behaviour. We found that the most probable ancestral regions for all Turdus species were located in the East Palearctic realm, followed by early colonization of the western Palearctic and Africa, and that several trans-Atlantic movements occurred between 11 and 4 million years ago, which is earlier than previously thought. Migration emerged as an ancestral behaviour of the genus Turdus, and differences in clutch size and main food types were significant between migratory and non-migratory species. Correlated evolution was found between migration and along-latitudinal mobility, main food type, and the shift in main food type between the seasons. We conclude that along-latitudinal movements may have evolved earlier, simultaneously with the radiation of the Turdus thrushes, followed by the appearance of meridional migration, associated with orographic and climatic changes. The increased clutch sizes observed in migratory species and documented here for thrushes could serve as an important mechanism to compensate for losses due to mortality during migration.

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Old Sunday 17th February 2019, 16:01   #28
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Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Jenő Nagy, Zsolt Végvári & Zoltán Varga. Phylogeny, migration and life history: flling the gaps in the origin and biogeography of the Turdus thrushes.
Journal of Ornithology (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-019-01632-3

Abstract:

Although the biogeographic history of thrushes (Turdidae) has been extensively studied, a concise discussion of this topic is still lacking. Therefore, in this study we aimed to investigate: (1) the evolutionary origin of the migratory behaviour of the Turdus thrushes in a biogeographic context including (2) trans-Atlantic dispersal events, (3) possible colonization routes into the Nearctic, and (4) relationships among life history traits, ecological factors, and migratory strategies within the most comprehensive taxon set of 72 Turdus thrushes to date. We estimated the ancestral ranges of the studied species, primarily by comparing main biogeographic models (dispersal-vicariance, dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis, BayArea models), and performed phylogenetic generalized least squares analyses to identify relationships among distribution patterns, diet, body measurements, clutch size, and migratory behaviour. We found that the most probable ancestral regions for all Turdus species were located in the East Palearctic realm, followed by early colonization of the western Palearctic and Africa, and that several trans-Atlantic movements occurred between 11 and 4 million years ago, which is earlier than previously thought. Migration emerged as an ancestral behaviour of the genus Turdus, and differences in clutch size and main food types were significant between migratory and non-migratory species. Correlated evolution was found between migration and along-latitudinal mobility, main food type, and the shift in main food type between the seasons. We conclude that along-latitudinal movements may have evolved earlier, simultaneously with the radiation of the Turdus thrushes, followed by the appearance of meridional migration, associated with orographic and climatic changes. The increased clutch sizes observed in migratory species and documented here for thrushes could serve as an important mechanism to compensate for losses due to mortality during migration.

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I'm so crazy that I could recognize five genera, only based on divergence time between each clade.
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Old Sunday 17th February 2019, 17:05   #29
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I'm so crazy that I could recognize five genera, only based on divergence time between each clade.
Crazy good mon ami
Merula? What others?
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Old Sunday 17th February 2019, 17:18   #30
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Crazy good mon ami
Merula? What others?

Psophocichla, Otocichla (mupinensis), Melizocincla (philomelos), Turdus (viscivorus, type species of Turdus) and Merula (if not available, Planesticus)
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Old Sunday 17th February 2019, 17:22   #31
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Nice! And makes sense to me at least.
Good luck getting general acceptance for them though
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Old Sunday 24th February 2019, 13:53   #32
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Melizocincla (philomelos

On another side, I wonder if the following names , Turdela and Lamprophonus shouldn't be applied instead of Melizocincla
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Old Sunday 24th February 2019, 21:11   #33
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Turdela. The HBW Key refers to Baker-Webb & Bertholet 1836. Here:
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/33/mode/1up .
I think this is not Latin or not a genus name. Grive (Turdela)
I did see Turdelam used by Brisson. Here:
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/248/mode/1up .
Not sure if this is Latin or if it is a genus name?
Melizocincla Wolters v. VI s. 405 1980.
Orig. Descr.
"Melizocincla subg. nov. - Gekennzeichnet durch die Kombination von spitzem Wandervogelflügel (ausserste Schwinge 10-15mm lang, 9. [von innen gezahlt] zwischen 7, und 6.), pfeilspitzenartige Flecken auf der Unterseite und ockergelbe Unterflügelfedern; Ohrgegend ohne dunkle Zeichnung (Unterscheid zu Otocichla), Schnabel weniger breit als bei der auch ähnlichen Hylocichla (die zudem weisse Unterflügeldecken hat); nicht geschlechtsdimorph (im Gegensatz zu Cichloselys s. str.). Eifärbung charakteristisch (grünblau mit kleinen schwarzen oder dunkelbraunen Flecken). T y p u s : Turdus philomelos Brehm, Handbuch d. Naturgesch. d. Vögel Deutschlands, p. 382 (1831)."
Quoting from the HBW Key:
Lamprophonus
(syn. Turdus Ϯ Song Thrush T. philomelos) Gr. λαμπροφωνος lamprophōnos clear-voiced < λαμπρος lampros clear; φωνη phōnē voice, cry < φωνεω phōneō to speak (cf. φωνος phōnos loud-voiced); "Lamprophonus musicus, Throstle. Lamprophonus variegatus, White's Thrush. Lamprophonus viscivorus, Shrite. Lamprophonus pilaris, Fieldfare. Lamprophonus turdus, Redwing." (Morris 1837) (OD per Björn Bergenholtz). Rev. Francis Orpen Morris was anti-Darwin but also anti- foxhunting? Charles Thorold Wood and Neville Wood seem to a modern person very bad about Latin and animal names.
https://www.euppublishing.com/doi/10.3366/anh.2016.0380 .
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Old Wednesday 27th February 2019, 20:05   #34
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Turdela seems to be a legit nomen to me
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Old Wednesday 13th March 2019, 23:09   #35
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The first new subspecies in 2019

Distribution and status of Turdus thrushes in white-sand areas of eastern Colombia, with a new subspecies of T. leucomelas
F. GARY STILES, JORGE ENRIQUE AVENDAÑO

Abstract

White-sand areas in the Colombian Amazon harbor many endemic and specialist species that are relatively little studied with respect to their ecology, distribution and zoogeographic affinities, for example Turdus thrushes. A recent expedition to the Serranía de Chiribiquete, a mountain range of Guianan origin in the Colombian Amazon, resulted in the discovery of an enigmatic Turdus thrush restricted to white-sand vegetation. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the ND2 gene revealed that this population is genetically similar to T. leucomelas albiventer, from which it differs in its smaller size and darker, duller plumage. Therefore, we here describe this population as a new subspecies of T. leucomelas. Furthermore, our inspection of specimens of Turdus taxa from eastern Colombia revealed the existence of sympatry between T. ignobilis debilis and T. i. arthuri at two sites. Based on this evidence and previously documented genetic and phenotypic differences, we recognize T. arthuri as a distinct biological species. We analyze distributions and measurements of functional traits among four thrush taxa of eastern Colombia.

Keywords

endemism, Guiana shield, habitat specialization, species delimitation, Aves

https://mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4567.1.9
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Old Thursday 14th March 2019, 18:00   #36
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The name of the new subspecies is Turdus leucomelas upichiarum

http://tb.plazi.org/GgServer/html/BF...9CF8E369BEFA16
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Old Saturday 16th March 2019, 19:50   #37
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Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
The first new subspecies in 2019

Distribution and status of Turdus thrushes in white-sand areas of eastern Colombia, with a new subspecies of T. leucomelas
F. GARY STILES, JORGE ENRIQUE AVENDAÑO

Abstract

White-sand areas in the Colombian Amazon harbor many endemic and specialist species that are relatively little studied with respect to their ecology, distribution and zoogeographic affinities, for example Turdus thrushes. A recent expedition to the Serranía de Chiribiquete, a mountain range of Guianan origin in the Colombian Amazon, resulted in the discovery of an enigmatic Turdus thrush restricted to white-sand vegetation. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the ND2 gene revealed that this population is genetically similar to T. leucomelas albiventer, from which it differs in its smaller size and darker, duller plumage. Therefore, we here describe this population as a new subspecies of T. leucomelas. Furthermore, our inspection of specimens of Turdus taxa from eastern Colombia revealed the existence of sympatry between T. ignobilis debilis and T. i. arthuri at two sites. Based on this evidence and previously documented genetic and phenotypic differences, we recognize T. arthuri as a distinct biological species. We analyze distributions and measurements of functional traits among four thrush taxa of eastern Colombia.

Keywords

endemism, Guiana shield, habitat specialization, species delimitation, Aves

https://mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4567.1.9
Full article there
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Old Sunday 17th March 2019, 16:49   #38
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Turdus arthuri

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
The first new subspecies in 2019

Distribution and status of Turdus thrushes in white-sand areas of eastern Colombia, with a new subspecies of T. leucomelas
F. GARY STILES, JORGE ENRIQUE AVENDAÑO

Abstract

White-sand areas in the Colombian Amazon harbor many endemic and specialist species that are relatively little studied with respect to their ecology, distribution and zoogeographic affinities, for example Turdus thrushes. A recent expedition to the Serranía de Chiribiquete, a mountain range of Guianan origin in the Colombian Amazon, resulted in the discovery of an enigmatic Turdus thrush restricted to white-sand vegetation. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of the ND2 gene revealed that this population is genetically similar to T. leucomelas albiventer, from which it differs in its smaller size and darker, duller plumage. Therefore, we here describe this population as a new subspecies of T. leucomelas. Furthermore, our inspection of specimens of Turdus taxa from eastern Colombia revealed the existence of sympatry between T. ignobilis debilis and T. i. arthuri at two sites. Based on this evidence and previously documented genetic and phenotypic differences, we recognize T. arthuri as a distinct biological species. We analyze distributions and measurements of functional traits among four thrush taxa of eastern Colombia.

Keywords

endemism, Guiana shield, habitat specialization, species delimitation, Aves

https://mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4567.1.9
IOC Updates Diary

Mar 15 Post proposed split of Campina Thrush on Updates/PS
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Old Wednesday 20th March 2019, 06:26   #39
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Turdus arthuri

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
The first new subspecies in 2019

Distribution and status of Turdus thrushes in white-sand areas of eastern Colombia, with a new subspecies of T. leucomelas
F. GARY STILES, JORGE ENRIQUE AVENDAÑO
https://mapress.com/j/zt/article/view/zootaxa.4567.1.9
Proposal (814) to SACC

Recognize Turdus arthuri as a valid species
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Old Tuesday 28th May 2019, 09:24   #40
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Luis Sandoval & Gilbert Barrantes. Is black plumage an adaptation to high elevations in a cosmopolitan bird genus? Journal of Avian Biology, Accepted articles.

Abstract:

Black plumage is expected to absorb and retain more heat and provide better protection against UV radiation compared with lighter plumages. Black plumage is common in species of the genera Turdus and Platycichla that inhabit highlands across different regions of the world. Considering this geographical recurrent pattern we tested the hypothesis that black plumage in these two genera has evolved as a co-adaptive response to inhabiting highlands, reconstructing ancestral character states for plumage and altitudinal distribution using maximum-likelihood methods, and a Pagel's multistate discrete method. For these analyses, we used a phylogeny based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA regions that included 60 of the 66 recognized species in the genera Turdus and Platycichla. We found that black-plumage coloration evolved independently on eight occasions within these two genera, and species with black plumage occur more often at highlands. Our results support the hypothesis that black-plumage is adaptative in highlands; but, studies in other bird groups with black-plumage inhabiting at the same elevations will provide evidence for this adaptive hypothesis or if the evolution of black-plumage in other groups is explained by other evolutionary forces.
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Old Tuesday 4th June 2019, 15:00   #41
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Turdus arthuri, Turdus murinus

IOC Updates Diary June 1

Accept Tepui Thrush

Accept Campina Thrush
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Old Thursday 6th June 2019, 18:37   #42
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Proposal (814) to SACC

Recognize Turdus arthuri as a valid species
Proposal (814) to SACC
Recognize Turdus murinus and T. arthuri as species distinct from T. ignobilis

PASSED (6 June 2019)
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Old Thursday 13th June 2019, 01:47   #43
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Proposal (814) to SACC
Recognize Turdus murinus and T. arthuri as species distinct from T. ignobilis

PASSED (6 June 2019)
But the remarks state that they went with Pantepui over Tepui as common name ...

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Old Thursday 13th June 2019, 23:34   #44
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But the remarks state that they went with Pantepui over Tepui as common name ...
IOC is using Pantepui now.
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Old Friday 19th July 2019, 17:01   #45
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Kathryn M.Everson, Jessica F.McLaughlin, Iris A.Cato, Maryanne M.Evans, Angela R.Gastaldi, Kendall K.Mills, Katie G.Shink, Sara M.Wilbu, Kevin Winker (2019).Speciation, gene flow, and seasonal migration in Catharus thrushes (Aves:Turdidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Available online 19 July 2019, In Press, Accepted Manuscript.


Highlights

• Ultraconserved element (UCE) data resolve the phylogeny of migratory Catharus thrushes.

• A fully migratory clade of Catharus thrushes has undergone speciation with gene flow.

• Historic gene flow throughout Catharus has produced reticulate gene phylogenies.

• Heteropatric speciation has played an important role in the genus.


Abstract
New World thrushes in the genus Catharus are small, insectivorous or omnivorous birds that have been used to explore several important questions in avian evolution, including the evolution of seasonal migration and plumage variation. Within Catharus, members of a clade of obligate long-distance migrants (C. fuscescens, C. minimus, and C. bicknelli) have also been used in the development of heteropatric speciation theory, a divergence process in which migratory lineages (which might occur in allopatry or sympatry during portions of their annual cycle) diverge despite low levels of gene flow. However, research on Catharus relationships has thus far been restricted to the use of small genetic datasets, which provide limited resolution of both phylogenetic and demographic histories. We used a large, multi-locus dataset from loci containing ultraconserved elements (UCEs) to study the demographic histories of the migratory C. fuscescens-minimus-bicknelli clade and to resolve the phylogeny of the migratory species of Catharus. Our dataset included more than 2,000 loci and over 1,700 variable genotyped sites, and analyses supported our prediction of divergence with gene flow in the fully migratory clade, with significant gene flow among all three species. Our phylogeny of the genus differs from past work in its placement of C. ustulatus, and further analyses suggest historic gene flow throughout the genus, producing genetically reticulate (or network) phylogenies. This raises questions about trait origins and suggests that seasonal migration and the resulting migratory condition of heteropatry is likely to promote hybridization not only during pairwise divergence and speciation, but also among non-sisters.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...55790319302106

Hylocichla seems to be embedded in Catharus. To read absolutely ...... If sci-hub works in your country

Last edited by LeNomenclatoriste : Friday 19th July 2019 at 17:04.
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Old Friday 19th July 2019, 19:15   #46
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Hylocichla seems to be embedded in Catharus.
Hylocichla mustelina is sister to a monophyletic Catharus.
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Old Friday 19th July 2019, 19:45   #47
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Hylocichla seems to be embedded in Catharus.
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Hylocichla mustelina is sister to a monophyletic Catharus.
As I read the diagrams (particularly Fig. 4), Hylocichla mustelina is probably sister to a monophyletic Catharus, but with some possibility that C. aurantiirostris and C. mexicanus might be closer to Hylocichla than to the rest of Catharus.
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Old Friday 19th July 2019, 19:48   #48
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Pantepui
As an aside - sounds like what a small child would say to their mother after an accident . . . "Mummy, help, panty pooey!"
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Old Friday 19th July 2019, 20:36   #49
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As an aside - sounds like what a small child would say to their mother after an accident . . . "Mummy, help, panty pooey!"
I probably would have gone with Pan-Tepui instead of the single word version (Pantepui). I realize that sounds weird coming from someone Danish; we are known for combining words!

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Old Friday 19th July 2019, 21:03   #50
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As I read the diagrams (particularly Fig. 4), Hylocichla mustelina is probably sister to a monophyletic Catharus, but with some possibility that C. aurantiirostris and C. mexicanus might be closer to Hylocichla than to the rest of Catharus.
Do you have the paper ? ^^
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