Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
Zeiss - Always on the lookout for something special – Shop now

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

True francolins & spurfowls

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 4 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Friday 19th August 2011, 09:36   #1
Daniel Philippe
Registered User
 
Daniel Philippe's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: France
Posts: 1,018
True francolins & spurfowls

Mandiwana-Neudani, T. G. et al., 2011. A study of gross morphological and histological syringeal features of true francolins (Galliformes: Francolinus, Scleroptila, Peliperdix and Dendroperdix spp.) and spurfowls (Pternistis spp.) in a phylogenetic context. Ostrich 82 (2): 115-127.

Abstract:
Modern taxonomies of francolins recognise 41 congeneric species, forming the largest genus of terrestrial gamebirds (Galliformes). Recent molecular, ecological and behavioural studies challenge this view, suggesting that they comprise two unrelated, monophyletic groups. There are 'true' francolins (Francolinus, Dendroperdix, Peliperdix and Scleroptila spp.) that are relatively small, ground-roosting birds, and spurfowls (Pternistis spp.) that are large birds that can roost in trees. This study explores gross morphological and histological syringeal anatomy of francolins, spurfowls and sister taxa to test whether differences are concordant with a molecular-based hypothesis. Differences found were the presence of a shieldversus diamond-shaped tympanum among francolins and spurfowls respectively. The first bronchial half rings are mineralised among francolins except in Dendroperdix sephaena, whereas almost no mineral deposition was observed among spurfowls. Histologically, francolins have a small, rounded pessulus (except in D. sephaena, which has a rounded, larger pessulus) contrary to the larger pessulus observed among spurfowls, which is rounded and triangular in Pternistis capensis and P. natalensis. Both gross and histological similarities within, and differences between, francolin and spurfowl syringes support this division. However, D. sephaena shows intermediate features between francolins and spurfowls.
Daniel Philippe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 22nd July 2012, 07:26   #2
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Francolinus

Forcina, Panayides, Guerrini, Nardi, Gupta, Mori, Al-Sheikhly, Mansoori, Khaliq, Rank, Parasharya, Khan, Hadjigerou & Barbanera (in press). Molecular evolution of the Asian francolins (Francolinus, Galliformes): a modern reappraisal of a classic study in speciation. Mol Phylogenet Evol. [abstract]

Last edited by Richard Klim : Sunday 22nd July 2012 at 07:55. Reason: typo.
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 15th September 2012, 21:39   #3
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
TiF

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Forcina, Panayides, Guerrini, Nardi, Gupta, Mori, Al-Sheikhly, Mansoori, Khaliq, Rank, Parasharya, Khan, Hadjigerou & Barbanera (in press). Molecular evolution of the Asian francolins (Francolinus, Galliformes): a modern reappraisal of a classic study in speciation. Mol Phylogenet Evol. [abstract]
John Boyd (TiF):
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/changes.html [15 Sep 2012]
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/List2.html#phasianidae
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 15th October 2013, 06:38   #4
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Pternistis

van Niekerk 2013. Vocal structure, behavior and partitioning of all 23 Pternistis spp. into homologous sound (and monophyletic) groups. Chinese Birds 4(3): 210–231. [abstract] [pdf]

Last edited by Richard Klim : Tuesday 15th October 2013 at 06:49.
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 23rd February 2014, 07:43   #5
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,879
Giovanni Forcina, Panicos Panayides, Nikolaos Kassinis, Monica Guerrini & Filippo Barbanera. Genetic characterization of game bird island populations: The conservation of the black francolin (Francolinus francolinus) of Cyprus. Journal for Nature Conservation. Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2014, Pages 15–22.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2013.07.004
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 2nd May 2014, 09:25   #6
Daniel Philippe
Registered User
 
Daniel Philippe's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: France
Posts: 1,018
Mandiwana-Neudani T.G., Bowie R.C.K., Hausberger M., Henry L. & Crowe T.M., 2014. Taxonomic and phylogenetic utility of variation in advertising calls of francolins and spurfowls (Galliformes: Phasianidae). Afr. Zool.: 49 (1): 54-82.

Abstract: Systematists have not often made use of avian vocalizations to assess the taxonomic rank of birds, or to infer their phylogenetic relationships. The likely reasons for this stem from the perceived inability to distinguish genetic and ecological components of variation in vocalizations, the difficulty in detecting homology across taxa, as well as the diverse selection pressures acting on vocal characters which may make such characters particularly prone to convergent evolution. In this study, we scored and analysed DNA and vocal characters of two delineated assemblages of gamebirds, francolins and spurfowls. Our phylogenetic results suggest that short strophes evolved from longer strophes among taxa within the genera Scleroptila and Peliperdix. More generally, our results corroborate the francolin–spurfowl dichotomy, with francolin calls generally being long and tonal, containing a series of discrete elements that have detectable harmonics. In contrast, most spurfowls render short, atonal calls with elements that generally have no harmonics, although they may contain discrete elements. Phylogenetically, Ortygornis sephaena is placed with ‘true’ francolins and its closest relatives are the two phylogenetically enigmatic Asian francolins, the grey francolin, Ortygornis pondicerianus, and swamp francolin, O. gularis.
Daniel Philippe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 17th May 2014, 11:31   #7
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Philippe View Post
Mandiwana-Neudani T.G., Bowie R.C.K., Hausberger M., Henry L. & Crowe T.M., 2014. Taxonomic and phylogenetic utility of variation in advertising calls of francolins and spurfowls (Galliformes: Phasianidae). Afr. Zool.: 49 (1): 54-82.
[pdf]
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 17th May 2014, 22:53   #8
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Mandiwana-Neudani et al 2014

Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Philippe View Post
Mandiwana-Neudani T.G., Bowie R.C.K., Hausberger M., Henry L. & Crowe T.M., 2014. Taxonomic and phylogenetic utility of variation in advertising calls of francolins and spurfowls (Galliformes: Phasianidae). Afr. Zool.: 49 (1): 54-82.
John Boyd (TiF):
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/changes.html (17 May 2014)
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/List2.html#phasianidae
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 14th July 2014, 18:21   #9
Papuan birder
- Lost in the Pacific -

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Cairns, Australia/Fiji
Posts: 616
Töpfer, T., Podsiadlowski, L. & Gedeon, K., 2014. Rediscovery of the Black-fronted Francolin Pternistis (castaneicollis) atrifrons (Conover, 1930) (Aves: Galliformes: Phasianidae) with notes on biology, taxonomy and conservation. Vertebrate Zoology 64 (2): 261-271.

Abstract: In May 2012 and in May 2013 we searched for the Black-fronted Francolin Pternistis (castaneicollis) atrifrons in the Mega area in Southern Ethiopia. Since most of the scarcely published records date back about seven decades, our objectives were (1) to confirm its presence at the type locality, (2) to explore other potentially suitable areas, (3) to collect information on morphology and field characteristics, behaviour and habitat, (4) to conclude on its taxonomic position, and (5) to make a preliminary assessment of threats to the birds and their habitat. We recorded at least 12 different Black-fronted Francolin individuals on five sites around the town of Mega (04°03′28″ N 38°19′16″ E). The birds inhabited semi-open woodland between 1,480 and 2,223 m asl, where the original juniper forest has almost vanished because of heavy utilisation pressure, primarily by the expansion of agriculture, grazing and harvesting of firewood and timber. A typical external feature of the males is a clearly visible bald yellow patch behind the eye. While no other P. castaneicollis subspecies seems to have this spot, other francolin species have. Additionally, our molecular and bioacoustic data support the separate taxonomic status of atrifrons. Taking together all characters, assigning species status for the Black-fronted Francolin is justified. Based on our survey, we estimate the current population to be very small, rendering the Black-fronted Francolin the most endangered galliform bird of Africa. Also, we assume its range to be much smaller and more fragmented than previously thought, making the local populations crucially endangered.

http://www.senckenberg.de/files/cont...er_261-271.pdf

Last edited by Papuan birder : Monday 14th July 2014 at 18:31.
Papuan birder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 14th July 2014, 20:15   #10
Melanie
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Kassel, Germany
Posts: 2,716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papuan birder View Post
Töpfer, T., Podsiadlowski, L. & Gedeon, K., 2014. Rediscovery of the Black-fronted Francolin Pternistis (castaneicollis) atrifrons (Conover, 1930) (Aves: Galliformes: Phasianidae) with notes on biology, taxonomy and conservation. Vertebrate Zoology 64 (2): 261-271.
It should be mentioned that Conover already described it as full species in 1930. Would be interesting to know whether the upcoming HBW-BirdLife checklist will accept this split
Melanie is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 13th November 2014, 09:05   #11
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Francolinus

Mandiwana-Neudani 2014. Taxonomy, phylogeny and biogeography of francolins ('Francolinus' spp.) Aves: Order Galliformes, Family Phasianidae. University of Cape Town: PhD thesis. [abstract] [pdf]
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 13th November 2014, 20:16   #12
andrew147
Registered User
 
andrew147's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Mandiwana-Neudani 2014. Taxonomy, phylogeny and biogeography of francolins ('Francolinus' spp.) Aves: Order Galliformes, Family Phasianidae. University of Cape Town: PhD thesis. [abstract] [pdf]
This thesis has me confused. Peliperdix is clearly polyphyletic as shown in this study and in other recent papers. Consequently, Mandiwana-Neudani proposes a new name for P. lathami (= Afrocolinus gen. nov.) and retains all other spp in Peliperdix... new generic names for divergent taxa are of course very welcome but isn't P. lathami actually the type species of Peliperdix?
__________________
Mammals: 327 (White-tailed Gnu)
Birds: 2422 (Capped Wheatear)
Reptiles: 113 (Black Girdled Lizard)
andrew147 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 14th November 2014, 06:34   #13
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew147 View Post
but isn't P. lathami actually the type species of Peliperdix?
Peliperdix Bonaparte, 1856, type species Francolinus lathami Hartlaub, 1854, by original monotypy.
This is unquestionable...
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 14th November 2014, 18:49   #14
andrew147
Registered User
 
andrew147's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 141
Not as shocking as the HBW Hylocharis blunder but still quite poor that this kind of thing gets through peer review...
__________________
Mammals: 327 (White-tailed Gnu)
Birds: 2422 (Capped Wheatear)
Reptiles: 113 (Black Girdled Lizard)
andrew147 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 14th November 2014, 20:11   #15
Nutcracker
Stop Brexit!
 
Nutcracker's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 17,592
I've seen plenty of nomenclatural howlers get through peer review in botanical papers too. Sometimes, it's poor choice of reviewers (not having someone knowledgeable about nomenclature), sometimes, worse, it appears to be cronyism, with reviewers letting stuff go through on the nod because they are friends with (or have an unwarranted high opinion of) the authors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew147 View Post
Not as shocking as the HBW Hylocharis blunder
What was that one?
Nutcracker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 14th November 2014, 20:56   #16
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
What was that one?
Hylocharis Boie, 1831.
Originally included species: Trochilus sapphirinus Gmelin, Trochilus latirostris Wied-Neuwied, Trochilus cyanus Vieillot, Trochilus lazulus Vieillot, Trochilus cyanotropus Wied-Neuwied, Trochilus bicolor Gmelin.
No original type species fixation; type species fixed by subsequent designation by Gray, 1840: Trochilus sapphirinus Gmelin, 1788.

Currently HBW-Alive has this type species as Amazilia sapphirina, while Hylocharis is recognised for H. eliciae, H. cyanus and H. chrysura...

Last edited by l_raty : Saturday 15th November 2014 at 06:49.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 30th May 2015, 20:11   #17
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,879
TiF Update May 30:
Francolins: The Orange River Francolin, Scleroptila gutturalis, has been split into Archer's Francolin (including subspecies archeri and lorti) and Orange River Francolin, Scleroptila levaillantoides. See Mandiwana-Neudani et al. (2014) and Sinclair and Ryan (2003).
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 1st June 2015, 06:13   #18
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,879
Peliperdix

Tshifhiwa Constance Nangammbi, 2003. Taxonomy and phylogeny of red-tailed francolins (Genus Peliperdix). Thesis, University of Cape Town.

[PDF]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 1st June 2015, 07:04   #19
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,879
Scleroptila

Tshifhiwa G Mandiwana, 2003. Taxonomy, phylogenetic and biogeographical relationships of African grassland Francolins (Genus: Scleroptila). Thesis, University of Cape Town.

Abstract and PDF here
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 25th September 2016, 18:25   #20
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,879
Francolinus pintadeanus

Xue-Juan Li and Li-Liang Lin. Complete mitochondrial genome of Francolinus pintadeanus (Galliformes: Phasianidae). Mitochondrial DNA Part B Vol. 1 , Iss. 1,2016.

[pdf]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 17th March 2017, 18:02   #21
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 2,879
Pternistis atrifrons

IOC Updates Diary Mar 17

Accept Black-fronted Francolin
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 8th January 2018, 20:12   #22
Acrocephalus
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Morocco
Posts: 943
van Niekerk, J. H. & Mandiwana-Neudani, T. G. 2018. The phylogeny of francolins (Francolinus, Dendroperdix, Peliperdix and Scleroptila) and spurfowls (Pternistis) based on chick plumage (Galliformes: Phasianidae). Avian Research 9:2. doi: 10.1186/s40657-017-0093-2

(Open access)
__________________
Mohamed
MaghrebOrnitho blog
.
Acrocephalus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 24th May 2018, 07:21   #23
Daniel Philippe
Registered User
 
Daniel Philippe's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: France
Posts: 1,018
Mandiwana-Neudani T.G., Little R.M., Crowe T.M. & Bowie R.C.K., 2018. Taxonomy, phylogeny and biogeography of African spurfowls (Galliformes, Phasianidae, Coturnicinae, Pternistis spp.). bioRxiv
Daniel Philippe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 16th May 2019, 20:01   #24
CaliSteve
Registered User

 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: California
Posts: 16
Elgon Francolin Scleroptila elgonensis should be treated as a species distinct from Moorland Francolin S. psilolaema.

Quote:
Moorland Francolin Scleroptila psilolaema is generally considered to comprise four subspecies in the highlands of Ethiopia, Kenya and eastern Uganda. This treatment is based on the shared habitat preferences (Afro-al
pine moorland) and supposedly similar plumage characteristics of the four taxa, although prior to 1963 they were not treated as conspecific. To determine whether this approach is strongly supported, we examined vocal and morphological evidence, and reviewed the available genetic data. The vocal data in particular displayed qualitative differences, with vocalisations of Elgon Francolin being more similar to those of Shelley’s Francolin S. shelleyi and Archer’s (Orange River) Francolin S. gutturalis than those of Moorland Francolin. We conclude that Ethiopian birds (‘Moorland Francolin’ S. psilolaema) and Kenyan / Ugandan birds (‘Elgon Francolin’ S. elgonensis) should be treated as separate species.
https://www.africanbirdclub.org/bull...uld-be-treated
CaliSteve is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is This True? ncbirds Cameras And Photography 9 Friday 23rd February 2007 10:25
True or not? MBP Hummingbirds 17 Sunday 15th January 2006 18:04
Is it true? javva Spotting Scopes & tripod/heads 4 Tuesday 24th May 2005 20:02
Is it true.... tarves57 The Birdforum Digiscoping Forum 4 Saturday 19th April 2003 16:20

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.29218507 seconds with 38 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 04:37.