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Old Wednesday 20th July 2005, 01:44   #26
MBP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by humminbird
In other words, these birds DO have a definite potential to become dehydrated and thus must have a way of rehydrating - something that would be difficult with just sugar water - or conserving water. The difficulty of rehydrating with sugar water can be shown in drinking a coke on a hot day - about 5 minutes later you want another coke.

Mark
Bastrop, TX
Sorry, but I still disagree. My quote only states that they have a potential of water loss and that they cope this by minimizing urinal water loss - not by drinking. About the sugar water - you cannot easily compare our system with hummingbirds. They do have a much faster metabolism, so the osmotic potential of the sugar will not be as effective as for us. And the burning of sugar does produce water again - six molecules of water per molecule of glucose. Not too sure about saccharose now, but I guess it would be 10 molecules of water per saccharose molecule. Anyway, I would suggest not to continue misusing desertdharma's thread for our personal disagreements .
And really nice pics! They sure do enjoy bathing. Personally, I have not been able to watch that yet, so you leave me a bit envious
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Old Wednesday 20th July 2005, 02:14   #27
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Well, I am not sure why they would do it if they do not need it, but I have personally seen them flying through sprinklers and misters with bill open, drinking at a drip, and drinking while bathing at a bird bath.

Mark
Bastrop, TX
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Old Wednesday 20th July 2005, 04:15   #28
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At this time during the summer, the hummers at my feeders will fill up all of the spaces at once while others wait for available space. However, earlier in the season they are chasing each other around. There are apparently several factors that dictate sharing/non-sharing behavior. I don't know whether it has to do with nesting, or if the baby critters are feeding now, too. Whatever the "psychology" of their little birdie brains is, I find it fascinating!
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Old Saturday 23rd July 2005, 06:37   #29
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photo_luver,

Thanks for the comments on my picture!

I have watched Hummers stick only their bill into my water fall, while still flying and while sitting in the water. If they are not drinking, they sure are faking it quite well.

Everything I read says "some may never drink" I don't think that means "all", which means that some might take a sip or two.

Larry

Last edited by ldsmith : Sunday 24th July 2005 at 03:10. Reason: Credit to wring person
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Old Saturday 23rd July 2005, 11:32   #30
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I have seen that phrase "some may never drink" referring to feeders - that they may never "learn" to go to a feeder - but I do not recall ever seeing it about water itself. Being around people who are banding hummingbirds, I have often heard of some birds that simply will not approach a feeder.

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Old Sunday 24th July 2005, 03:23   #31
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Here are some links to hummingbirds and drinking water

http://pubs.cas.psu.edu/FreePubs/pdfs/uh123.pdf

http://www.laspilitas.com/California_birds/Hummingbirds/Anna's_Hummingbird/Anna's_Hummingbird.htm

http://elibrary.unm.edu/sora/Condor/...0606-p0612.pdf

Check page 4 near the bottom of the above article
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Old Sunday 24th July 2005, 03:58   #32
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I just saw this tonight. The more we watch them the more we learn I guess.
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Old Sunday 24th July 2005, 04:18   #33
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Thanks Ismith.
Every one of those quotes papers makes it quite clear that these birds DO drink water. I have never found a responsible hummingbird author that has minimized the necessity of water in their habitats.

Mark
Bastrop, TX
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Old Friday 5th August 2005, 21:13   #34
Rubythroat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck A. Walla
I just saw this tonight. The more we watch them the more we learn I guess.
I have seen the hummingbirds use the Oriole feeder, but not at the same time the Orioles have been there, but when the Oriole feeder became completely overrun by wasps and yellowjackets I had to decommission it but before doing so, I noticed a woodpecker perched on it! Literally did a complete double take when I saw that!

The oriole feeder has been filled with water only and the number of wasps/yellowjackets has decreased significently and although two or three fly around the hummingbird feeder, they cannot get inside as the holes are too small, and they are slowly losing interest, to my delight!
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Old Sunday 7th August 2005, 02:35   #35
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RubyThroat,

Try a Oriole feeder like this one. Bees can't get in, yet Orioles and Woodpeckers can. It's made by Opius.

Also, here is a picture of a Gila Woodpecker feeding in one of my hummer feeders.
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Old Sunday 7th August 2005, 23:40   #36
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Thanks for the tip on Opus feeder - will be getting one - I have SWARMS of honeybees on my h.b.feeder. It is funny to watch the hummer fight the bees. ? - can bees sting birds? Fall must be coming early as suddenly MANY hummers are visiting the feeder (stocking up) but also we are in a mild drought.... anyway it's too dangerous to sit out on the patio - too much activity!
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Old Thursday 11th August 2005, 04:50   #37
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I don't know if any of you have ever been to Tinkertown, which isn't far from our home (it's at the eastern foothills of the Sandias near Cedar Crest), but we were there last Sunday. They have two big feeders hanging by their entrance, and the hummers were absolutely swarming and buzzing around them like crazy -- fighting AND sharing. There were black-chinned, broad-tailed, and rufous (male and female) -- usually 6-7 at the feeders, and as many sitting up in the nearby trees waiting their turns. What a great show. Tinkertown was fun, but the hummers stole the show.

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