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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 18:56   #76
Fred Ruhe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
IOC 7.2 Species Updates

Alopecoenas norfolkensis

Restore. Originally listed as Gallicolumba norfolciensis (Latham, 1801) but that name permanently surpressed by the ICZN. Redescribed by Forshaw, 2015 based on a contemporary illustration by John Hunter.
I have some quetions: why was the Latham name surpressed ?
Should the species now be known as Alopecoenas norfolkensis Forshaw, 2015.?
Why did he change the epithet from norfolciensis to norfolkensis ?

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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 19:29   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Ruhe View Post
I have some quetions: why was the Latham name surpressed ?
Should the species now be known as Alopecoenas norfolkensis Forshaw, 2015.?
Why did he change the epithet from norfolciensis to norfolkensis ?

Fred Ruhe
HBW/BL: Until recently the ground-dove species reported from Norfolk I was associated with the name Columba norfolciensis Latham, 1801; however, there is no type specimen for this name, and original description appears to be composite, perhaps referring to both Columba leucomela (infrequent vagrant to Norfolk I) and Chalcophaps longirostris (present on Norfolk I, possibly introduced), due to incertain identity, combined with confused usage spanning three rather different genera, this name has now been formally suppressed. Indeed, a fourth genus might now been applied, as with recent split of genus Gallicolumba (which see), present species, if valid, would most likely belong in Alopecoenas. Validity of species requires confirmation.

The Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature OPINION 2251 (Case 3442) Columba norfolciensis Latham, 1801 (Aves, COLUMBIDAE): name suppressed. The Commission has suppressed the ambiguous binomen Columba norfolciensis Latham, 1801, which has been applied to three different species in different columbid genera within the last hundred years.
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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 20:00   #78
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Dear Peter,

Thank you for this explination. It makes the answer to my first question clear!

Thanks,

Fred
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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 20:06   #79
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And I have another question:

What did Forshaw designate as the holotype ? Is it the painting or is it the subfossil material ?

Who knows ?

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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 20:16   #80
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Fred,

The holotype is the bird that Hunter painted (not 'the painting' itself): this is indicated in the plate caption on p.84 of Forshaw's work, [here].

Suppression was requested by Schodde & Bock 2008 [abstract], based on an argument that included:
Quote:
Because of such conflicting recent usages, the SCON considered Columba norfolciensis a source of confusion that would remain so into the immediate future or beyond; and it therefore resolved to apply to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature for suppression of the name. It viewed such action as helping to maintain the in-use specific name Columba leucomela Temminck, 1821 for the Australian white-headed pigeon and the subspecific name Chalcophaps indica sandwichensis Ramsay for the form of the common emerald dove in the southwest Pacific. Moreover, it would facilitate naming subfossil columbid material from Norfolk Island when the identity of that material became fully clarified.
The bird illustrated by Hunter should now be called Alopecoenas norfolkensis Forshaw, 2015 -- unless, of course, you think this bird was something else to which an earlier name applies (e.g., a Columba leucomela Temminck 1821).
As is usual in such cases, Latham's name was "suppressed for the Purposes of the Principle of Priority but not for those of the Principle of Homonymy" -- this means it cannot take priority over a junior name to become the valid name of a taxon, but it still preoccupies it own spelling and thus cannot become valid from a later publication. The same epithet cannot be proposed again.

Last edited by l_raty : Saturday 18th February 2017 at 20:48.
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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 20:23   #81
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Well Laurent,

This makes life bearable !

Thanks,

Fred
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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 20:53   #82
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There may be a problem here, though...
Quote:
Article 58. Variant spellings of species-group names deemed to be identical. Species-group names established for different nominal taxa that differ in spelling only in any of the following respects and that are of the same derivation and meaning are deemed to be homonyms when the nominal taxa they denote are included in the same genus or collective group:
[...]
58.5. use of c or k for the same letter (e.g. microdon, mikrodon);
[...]
58.15. presence or absence of -i before a suffix or termination (e.g. timorensis, timoriensis; comstockana, comstockiana).
Thus norfolkensis and norfolciensis are deemed identical, and the latter does preoccupy the former if they are congeneric...

Last edited by l_raty : Saturday 18th February 2017 at 21:02.
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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 21:52   #83
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Dear Laurent,

As I understand, the Latham name is surpressed, so the name is not valid anymore, a nomina nova was proposed, and the new name does not have to take into account the old name that has been surpressed, the name no longer excists. It cannot be that in this case norfolciensis must be taken into account. So I think the name of the taxon must be Alopecoenas norfolkensis Forshaw, 2015 and all the rules of the ICZN are met.

I might be wrong, of course, the ways of God are inscrutable, but are nothing compared to those of the government (in this case the ICZN).

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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 22:32   #84
l_raty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Ruhe View Post
As I understand, the Latham name is surpressed, so the name is not valid anymore, a nomina nova was proposed, and the new name does not have to take into account the old name that has been surpressed, the name no longer excists. It cannot be that in this case norfolciensis must be taken into account. So I think the name of the taxon must be Alopecoenas norfolkensis Forshaw, 2015 and all the rules of the ICZN are met.

I might be wrong, of course, the ways of God are inscrutable, but are nothing compared to those of the government (in this case the ICZN).
But what applies here is:
Quote:
80.7.1. A work, name or nomenclatural act entered in an Official Index has the status attributed to it in the relevant ruling(s).
...and the relevant ruling(s) don't say that the name no longer exists; they say (Opinion 2251 [abstract]):
Quote:
Ruling
(1) Under the plenary power the name norfolciensis Latham, 1801, as published in the binomen Columba norfolciensis, is hereby suppressed for the Purposes of the Principle of Priority but not for those of the Principle of Homonymy.
(2) The name norfolciensis Latham, 1801, as published in the binomen Columba norfolciensis and as suppressed in (1) above, is hereby placed on the Official Index of Rejected and Invalid Specific Names in Zoology.
Ergo, the name is suppressed only for the purposes of the Principle of Priority; it still exists as far as homonymy is concerned.

This is crucial, actually. In works dating from Latham's times, the simple use in a publication of a then-unavailable name, together with a description, results in the name being made available. Should the effect of the suppression be that the proposal of the name by Latham 1801 simply 'ceased to exist', this name would automatically be available from the next subsequent publication where it was used and the bird was described. The fact that Latham's name still enters into homonymy, thus preoccupies all those potential subsequent names, is the only thing that prevents this.
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Old Saturday 18th February 2017, 23:03   #85
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I think you are right Laurent.

So the name Alopecoenas norfolkensis Forshaw, 1915 should stand.

One of the best examples of what I stated: the ways of God are inscrutable, but are nothing compared to those of the government (in this case the ICZN, but at least, they wrote them down).

Please, correct me if I am wrong, I better stick to fossil birds, not hypothetical ones.

Fred Ruhe
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Old Tuesday 21st February 2017, 05:40   #86
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Tif Update February 20, 2017

Norfolk Ground-Dove :

The Norfolk Ground-Dove, formerly Alopecoenas norfolciensis, becomes Alopecoenas norfolkensis . The old name had been supressed by the ICZN. The new name is due to Forshaw (2015).
[Columbidae, Columbea, 3.05]

Last edited by LeNomenclatoriste : Tuesday 21st February 2017 at 05:51.
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Old Monday 27th February 2017, 15:36   #87
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On the functional extinction of the Passenger Pigeon
Authors

David L. Roberts, Ivan Jarić and Andrew R. Solow

Accepted manuscript online: 24 February 2017Full publication history
DOI: 10.1111/cobi.12914View/save citation
Cited by: 0 articles

Article has an altmetric score of 16

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1111/cobi.12914

Abstract

The Passenger Pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) was a social breeder and it has been suggested that the species experienced functional extinction, defined as a total reproductive failure, prior to its actual extinction in the early years of the 20th century. Here, we apply a novel statistical method to a record of egg specimens and so-called skin specimens to test for functional extinction. The results indicate that the species did not become functionally extinct, suggesting that proposals to reverse its rapid decline in the late 19th century could have been successful.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...cceptedarticle

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Old Tuesday 28th February 2017, 09:24   #88
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Ducula

Alice Cibois, Jean-Claude Thibault, Céline Bonillo, Christopher E. Filardi, Eric Pasquet. Phylogeny and biogeography of the imperial pigeons (Aves: Columbidae) in the Pacific Ocean. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 27 February 2017.

Abstract:

We reconstruct the phylogeny of imperial pigeons (genus Ducula) using mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data. We evaluate the most likely biogeographic scenario for the evolution of this group that colonized many islands of the Pacific Ocean. The divergence time analysis suggests that the basal divergences within Ducula occurred more recently than in the fruit doves (genus Ptilinopus), a group that is also well diversified in Oceania. The imperial pigeons colonized the Melanesian region several times independently, and the diversification within this region led to several species in sympatry, in particular in the Bismarck archipelago. Central Polynesia was also colonized several times, first by a lineage during the Miocene that led to the large D. latrans, sister to the New Caledonian endemic D. goliath, then more recently by the widespread D. pacifica, during the Pleistocene. The phylogenetic pattern obtained with the extant Ducula species showed that the Eastern Polynesian endemics do not form a monophyletic group, with the Pacific Imperial Pigeon D. pacifica sister species with good support to the Polynesian Imperial Pigeon D. aurorae. However, the impact of recent anthropic extinctions has been important for the imperial pigeons, more than for the smaller fruit doves, suggesting that several Ducula lineages might be missing today.
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Old Monday 6th March 2017, 09:40   #89
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There is a beautiful film on Australian Parrots on youtube, it last over 53 minutes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smj-...1#t=11.3199902

Enjoy it,

Fred
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Old Monday 6th March 2017, 09:41   #90
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Sorry,

This one has to be on the Parrot thread

Fred
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Old Friday 10th August 2018, 07:44   #91
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Here´s a short question regarding the Type of the Chiriquí Quail-Dove (Oreopeleia/Geotrygon) Zentrygon chiriquensis P. L. SCLATER 1856 (OD, here), as "Geotrygon chiriquensis" ...

Anyone who knows why the US (Smithsonian) National Museum of Natural History has their specimen of "Geotrygon chiriquensis" (USNM 51266)*; a specimen collected by José C. Zeledón in Cartago, Costa Rica, 15th of April 1867 (here), in their Special Collection of "Types" ... when the Type itself ("Holotype par monotypie"), ended up in the collection of Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, in Paris (according to Voisin et al, 2005, here, p.861) ... ?!?

The very first, latter, specimen was collected by "Mr. Bridges" [i.e. Thomas Charles Bridges (1807-1865)], in January-March 1856, shortly pre-OD (of 27 May, 1856).

Just curious ... but I guess I simply missed something ... or?

Björn

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*Not to confuse with their other specimen (USNM 470624); from Chiriquí, Panama, collected 8th of March, 1956, by Frank A. Hartman.
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Old Friday 10th August 2018, 07:56   #92
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The acquisition book at the MNHN mentions
11518b Col Ch Bonaparte 1857
They only have one specimen of this species.
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Old Friday 10th August 2018, 09:17   #93
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Ok, but why do the US Museum consider a later specimen collected in 1867, in Cartago, Costa Rica, to be a "Type"?

That's eleven years later than the one collected by Bridges, and far from the Type locality Ciriquí, Panama ...

Is it somehow considered a Paratype/Syntype/Male/Female specimen? And even if so, is that needed/suitable, when we now know that the Holotype excist?
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Old Friday 10th August 2018, 10:14   #94
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Quote:
Specimen/Lot
Catalog Number: USNM 51266
Special Collections: Types
Specimen Count: 1
Current Identification: Geotrygon chiriquensis
Other Identifications: Geotrygon linearis chiriquensis
Geotrygon coeruleiceps Lawrence
Type Status: Type
Type Citations: Lawrence. (Not Earlier Than April) 1868. Ann. Lyc. Nat. Hist. New York. 9: 136.
Common Name: Chiriqui Quail-Dove
Date Collected: 15 Apr 1867https://www.birdforum.net/editpost.php?do=editpost&p=3749917
Country: Costa Rica
Province/State: Cartago
Precise Locality: Cervantes
Expedition: Explorations In Costa Rica, Dr. A. Von Frantzius
Collector(s): Zeledon, J. C.
Field Number(s): 273
Sex/Stage:
Sex Stage Remarks
Female Adult
Preparation Details:
Preparation Remarks
Skin: Whole
EZID: http://n2t.net/ark:/65665/37e4c3221-...9-a3f897a00721
This specimen is the type of Geotrygon coeruleiceps Lawrence 1868.
Lawrence GN. 1868. A catalogue of the birds found in Costa Rica. Ann. Lyc. Nat. Hist. New York, 9: 86-149.; p. 136; [OD].

A junior synonym of chiriquensis.

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Old Friday 10th August 2018, 13:31   #95
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Thanks Laurent!

They sure managed to confuse me ...
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Old Yesterday, 05:28   #96
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Paraclaravis, a new genus for the Purple-winged and Maroon-chested Ground-doves (Aves: Columbidae)

GEORGE SANGSTER, ANDREW D. SWEET, KEVIN P. JOHNSON

Abstract

Previous molecular phylogenetic analyses and new analyses reported here demonstrate that the genus Claravis is not monophyletic and comprises two lineages, one with the species pretiosa Ferrari-Pérez, 1886 (Blue Ground-dove), and the other with two species: geoffroyi Temminck, 1811 (Purple-winged Ground-dove) and mondetoura Bonaparte, 1856 (Maroon-chested Ground-dove). Because the generic name Claravis is typified by C. pretiosa (Ferrari-Pérez, 1886), a new genus, Paraclaravis gen. nov., is described for geoffroyi Temminck, 1811 and mondetoura Bonaparte, 1856.

http://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/...taxa.4461.1.10

I predicted this genus in my checklist, maybe I should publish one day

I have split Columbina into more subgenera but I don't know if Columbigallina Boie, 1826 is preoccupied by Columbigallina Oken, 1817

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Old Yesterday, 06:28   #97
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Paraclaravis, a new genus for the Purple-winged and Maroon-chested Ground-doves (Aves: Columbidae)
Excellent. I don't have access to this paper, does anyone know which species is designated as the type of Paraclaravis?
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Old Yesterday, 06:51   #98
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Originally Posted by andrew147 View Post
Excellent. I don't have access to this paper, does anyone know which species is designated as the type of Paraclaravis?
I have the paper, the type species is C. mondetoura
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Old Yesterday, 07:48   #99
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I have the paper, the type species is C. mondetoura
Thanks very much :)
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Old Yesterday, 20:16   #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LeNomenclatoriste View Post
I have split Columbina into more subgenera but I don't know if Columbigallina Boie, 1826 is preoccupied by Columbigallina Oken, 1817
My take on Oken 1817 would be that no bird names are available from it.

(To the exception of a single ISS ('Eurenetes' instead of Ereunetes; first instance of this spelling listed fide Neave), all the 'novelties' in this work appear to be in the column that contains Oken's description of Cuvier's system (in a somewhat "more latinized" form than the original). Oken did not adopt this system, thus none of the names in this column satisfies 11.5; nor did he establish any correspondence between the names he listed in this column, and those he used in his own system, thus none of these names can be regarded as "treated as a junior synonym of a name then used as valid" either, which might have made them candidates to [possibly] become available under 11.6.)
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