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Columbiformes

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Old Friday 23rd April 2010, 21:14   #1
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Columbiformes

Gibb & Penny 2010. Two aspects along the continuum of pigeon evolution: A South-Pacific radiation and the relationship of pigeons within Neoaves. Mol Phyl Evol: in press.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...006b45f07df667

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Old Saturday 24th April 2010, 09:18   #2
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Quote:
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... the relationship of pigeons within Neoaves
... and the parrots are not close to the falcons anymore
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Old Saturday 24th April 2010, 15:22   #3
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... and the parrots are not close to the falcons anymore
... and the mites seem to know more than us on the systematic position of the order Falconiformes and its phylogenetic relationships:

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/con...ent=a921556943

"The syringophilids are obligatory parasitic mites, which are highly specific to their host. Most of the genera are associated with a specific host order or closely related bird’s orders (Fain et al. 2000). Up to now, six species of the genus Megasyringophilus have been described exclusively from parrots (Psittaciformes) (Fain et al. 2000; Skoracki 2005a), whereas mites of the genus Peristerophila were recorded only from pigeons and doves (Columbiformes). It is noteable that the genus Peristerophila belongs to the “Peristerophila complex genera”, inhabiting birds of the closely related orders Psittaciformes, Columbiformes and Passeriformes (Bochkov and Perez 2002; Skoracki 2005a, b). Unexpectedly finding representants of these two genera on diurnal raptors supports the hypothesis that this order is closely related to the parrots–doves clade. The association of these two genera with doves, parrots and diurnal raptors may be explained by the presence of its ancestor on the common progenitor of the Falconiformes–Psittaciformes–Columbiformes. In our opinion, the future investigation of quill mite fauna as well as other obligatory and permanent ectoparasites (like feather mites or Mallophaga) parasitizing birds of prey will support this hypothesis."
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Old Saturday 24th April 2010, 15:26   #4
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given the number of times I have mistaken doves on powerlines for kestrels, seems strangely appropriate...
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Old Saturday 24th April 2010, 19:08   #5
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I'm trying to sort things through here is my head, so I might be dead wrong.

* The mites study finds support for a relationship falcons (or do they mean Accipitriformes as well?) + parrots + pigeons
* Gibb & Penny 2010 states (only read the abstract) that the pigeons are closest to sandgrouse and closer to falcons than parrots

In my mind, that doesn't have to contradict Hackett 2008 (falcons as sister to parrots+perching birds) other than that we have to squeeze in pigeons and sandgrouse here.

How about:
((Columbiformes+Pterocliformes)+Falconiformes)+(Ps ittaciformes+Passeriformes)?

Plus somewhere in this mess the seriemas.

But in that case, what happened to the old Metaves hypothesis? Is it dead now? Or does it just exclude the doves?

I also find the Ptilinopus paraphyly interesting. Does anyone have the full paper?
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Old Saturday 24th April 2010, 19:23   #6
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I don't feel there is enough evidence yet to really say for sure what falcons are related to (other than they are not closely related to accipitriformes)
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Old Sunday 25th April 2010, 16:04   #7
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I also find the Ptilinopus paraphyly interesting.
Alectroenas and Drepanoptila are embedded in Ptilinopus.
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Old Wednesday 28th April 2010, 10:33   #8
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Quote:
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... and the parrots are not close to the falcons anymore
In this paper Psittaciformes and Piciformes are sister orders and also Davis, 2008 here
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Old Thursday 29th April 2010, 12:11   #9
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Ok this is probably a dumb statement/question...but err arent a lot of Columbiformes prey of raptors and so on?

Agreed quill microfauna is very interesting, but I have my doubts on some of the statistical independence. I think the entomologists found host jumping in feather mites a few years back, can't remember the paper though. Think it was the annual review of Entomology.

Personally one of the problems here, is the mites are poorly understood on the whole. So a lot of guess work is involved on that end - until another few hundred Phd's are churned out to get some basic info. (For some reason people are not lining up to spend a large chunk of their life studying mites...) And of course the overlap of entomology and ornithology presents problems in itself. Not many ornithologists keep up with entomology and so on.

I would be cautious basing too much on such things at present.

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Old Friday 5th October 2012, 05:59   #10
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SACC Proposal 552: Add subfamilies to Columbidae
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Old Wednesday 30th January 2013, 10:11   #11
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Lapiedra et al 2013

Lapiedra, Sol, Carranza & Beaulieu 2013. Behavioural changes and the adaptive diversification of pigeons and doves. Proc R Soc B 280(1755). [abstract] [pdf]

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Old Sunday 28th April 2013, 06:52   #12
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Khan & Arif

Khan & Arif (in press). COI barcodes and phylogeny of doves (Columbidae family). Mitochondrial DNA. [abstract]
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Old Wednesday 5th June 2013, 21:18   #13
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Zootaxa 3669 (2): 184–188 (6 Jun. 2013)
Classification of a clade of New World doves (Columbidae: Zenaidini)
RICHARD C. BANKS, JASON D. WECKSTEIN, J.V. REMSEN, JR & KEVIN P. JOHNSON

http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2013/f/z03669p188f.pdf
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Old Thursday 6th June 2013, 06:23   #14
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Zenaidini

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melanie View Post
Zootaxa 3669 (2): 184–188 (6 Jun. 2013)
Classification of a clade of New World doves (Columbidae: Zenaidini)
RICHARD C. BANKS, JASON D. WECKSTEIN, J.V. REMSEN, JR & KEVIN P. JOHNSON
http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2013/f/z03669p188f.pdf
NEOORN, 5 Jun 2013...
Quote:
Re: [NEOORN-L] Zootaxa: Classification of a clade of New World doves (Columbidae: Zenaidini)

Amigos, conseguí una copia en PDF del artículo sobre Zenaidini. Realmente interesante. Aquí incluyo parte de él, las recomendaciones taxonómicas que se plantean:

Taxonomic recommendations

The genera of doves treated herein form a well-supported phylogenetic group (see Johnson and Weckstein 2011), and share many features of morphology and plumage. We propose that they be recognized as a tribe Zenaidini and suggest the following sequential listing of species, based on Fig. 1 and using the following conventions: (1) the branch with the fewest genera is listed first at each node of the phylogeny; (2) within a genus, the branch with the fewest species at each node is listed first; and (3) for terminal species pairs, the northwestern-most is listed first. Species not included in Fig. 1 and thus placed using traditional views of relationships (mainly from Baptista et al. 1997) are marked with an asterisk (*).

Tribe Zenaidini

Genus Geotrygon

Geotrygon purpurata
Geotrygon saphirina
Geotrygon versicolor
Geotrygon montana
Geotrygon violacea
Geotrygon caniceps*
Geotrygon leucometopia*
Geotrygon chrysia
Geotrygon mystacea*

Genus Leptotrygon

Leptotrygon veraguensis

Genus Leptotila

Leptotila verreauxi
Leptotila jamaicensis
Leptotila cassini
Leptotila conoveri*
Leptotila ochraceiventris*
Leptotila plumbeiceps (incl. battyi*, treated as a species by Gibbs et al. (2001) and Dickinson (2003))
Leptotila rufaxilla
Leptotila wellsi*
Leptotila pallida*
Leptotila megalura

Genus Zentrygon

Zentrygon carrikeri*
Zentrygon costaricensis
Zentrygon lawrencii
Zentrygon albifacies
Zentrygon frenata
Zentrygon linearis*
Zentrygon chiriquensis
Zentrygon goldmani

Genus Zenaida

Zenaida asiatica
Zenaida meloda
Zenaida aurita
Zenaida galapagoensis
Zenaida auriculata
Zenaida macroura
Zenaida graysoni

Saludos,

JC
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Presumably resulting from AOU-SACC Proposal #560 (Remsen, Oct 2012): Add "Tribes" to classification where warranted.

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Old Thursday 6th June 2013, 19:59   #15
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Zenaidini

John Boyd (TiF):
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/changes.html (6 Jun 2013)
www.jboyd.net/Taxo/List3.html#columbidae
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Old Wednesday 4th September 2013, 05:56   #16
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Fruit Doves

Alice Cibois, Jean-Claude Thibault, Céline Bonillo, Christopher E. Filardi, Dick Watling & Eric Pasquet. Phylogeny and biogeography of the fruit doves (Aves: Columbidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press.
Abstract
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Old Thursday 5th September 2013, 10:18   #17
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Cibois et al

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Alice Cibois, Jean-Claude Thibault, Céline Bonillo, Christopher E. Filardi, Dick Watling & Eric Pasquet. Phylogeny and biogeography of the fruit doves (Aves: Columbidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press.
Abstract
Recommends reinstatement of the following genera (in addition to Ptilinopus, Alectroenas, Drepanoptila):
  • Megaloprepia: magnificus, bernsteinii (reverts to M formosa)

  • Ramphiculus: marchei, merrilli, leclancheri, jambu, occipitalis, fischeri? (not sampled), subgularis? (not sampled)

  • Chrysoena: luteovirens, layardi (reverts to C viridis?), victor

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Old Thursday 5th September 2013, 10:46   #18
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[*]Megaloprepia: magnificus, bernsteinii (reverts to M formosa)
Is Megaloprepia masculine or feminine ?
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Old Thursday 5th September 2013, 10:57   #19
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Megaloprepia

Quote:
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Is Megaloprepia masculine or feminine ?
Good point, Daniel. Seems to be feminine: Peters 1937.

So, Megaloprepia magnifica.

Jobling 2010...
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Megaloprepia (syn. Ptilinopus) Gr. megaloprepeia magnificence.

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Old Friday 6th September 2013, 04:30   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Recommends reinstatement of the following genera (in addition to Ptilinopus, Alectroenas, Drepanoptila):
  • Megaloprepia: magnificus, bernsteinii (reverts to M formosa)

  • Ramphiculus: marchei, merrilli, leclancheri, jambu, occipitalis, fischeri? (not sampled), subgularis? (not sampled)

  • Chrysoena: luteovirens, layardi (reverts to C viridis?), victor
TiF Update:
September 5
Cibois et al. (2013) carried out a fairly complete analysis of Ptilinopus, including most Ptilinopus species. The current arrangement of Ptilinopus is based on their results. They suggested a six genus treatment that retained Alectroenas and Drepanoptila. However, this may mean that Ptilinopus is not monophyletic, and it does not materially solve the problem of Ptilinopus heterogeneity. I do not recommend it at this time.
[Columbidae, Metaves I, 2.68]

Ptilinopus Tree
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Old Friday 6th September 2013, 11:28   #21
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Is there any evidence that endemic doves or pigeons once occurred on the Hawaiian Islands? I mean pigeons are known to colonise the most remote islands (e.g. St Helena, Galapagos) so why not Hawaii?

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Old Saturday 7th September 2013, 09:59   #22
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Quote:
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Is there any evidence that endemic doves or pigeons once occurred on the Hawaiian Islands? I mean pigeons are known to colonise the most remote islands (e.g. St Helena, Galapagos) so why not Hawaii?
Possibly not ... I can see no mention of Columbidae among the historically-known extinct birds of the Hawaii group, nor among those known only as fossils in:

Descriptions of Thirty-Two New Species of Birds from the Hawaiian Islands: Part I. Non- Passeriformes
Author(s): Storrs L. Olson and Helen F. JamesSource: Ornithological Monographs, No. 45, Descriptions of Thirty-Two New Species of Birdsfrom the Hawaiian Islands: Part I. Non-Passeriformes (1991), pp. 1-88
Published by: University of California Press for the American Ornithologists' Union
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40166794 .

Fossil Birds from the Hawaiian Islands: Evidence for
Wholesale Extinction by Man Before Western Contact
STORRS L. OLSON and HELEN F. JAMES
SCIENCE, VOL. 217, 13 AUGUST 1982

Curious though - an amazing selection of birds did reach Hawaii, but this may have been a step too far for pigeons/doves?

Cheers,

Keith
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Old Saturday 7th September 2013, 10:25   #23
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Well, I could image that pigeons and doves once occurred in Hawaii, but were hunted and eaten to extinction by the early Polynesians in that way that no fossil material remained. Or the fossil material has been lost by wind, weather, and other natural events. Today there are only introduced doves and pigeons (e.g. on Waikiki)

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Old Saturday 7th September 2013, 11:41   #24
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Quote:
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Well, I could image that pigeons and doves once occurred in Hawaii, but were hunted and eaten to extinction by the early Polynesions in that way that no fossil material remained. Or the fossil material has been lost by wind, weather, and other natural events. Today there are only introduced doves and pigeons (e.g. on Waikiki)
It's also feasible that any pigeon that did reach the Hawaiian archipelago became flightless, flourishing until introduced predators came on the scene. It was commonplace for any sailors from the 16th century onwards to describe any kind of plump landbird as a 'pigeon'.
MJB
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Old Saturday 7th September 2013, 13:11   #25
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Well, it might be also possible that vulcanic activities have prevent that pigeons became widespread on Hawaii. But it could be also feasible that e.g. relatives of the Mourning Dove (Zenaida) could have reached Hawaii million years ago and formed an own species which became extinct maybe before the settlement of the Hawaiian Islands.
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