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Help to identify UK Bird

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Old Wednesday 6th May 2015, 07:42   #1
Birdxman
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Help to identify UK Bird

To be honest Ive only joined to find out just what this bird is--Im in the East Midlands of the UK-Fen Country.
Ive seen the bird over the last 10 years but I can never get near enough to view it clearly or get a clear photograph so all I can tell you to help is the following:

It tends to habit ploughed fields mainly but it has been in my grass field twice.
The bird is a brownish colour, about the size of a finch, the real thing you notice is that when the bird flys away from you it has a very clear white rump when its in flight. (its not a Bull Finch) Its this white rump area that has me puzzled, I have been through my Bird books upteen times but cannot identify it--your help would be appreciated. (no other details known to help you
Thanks
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Old Wednesday 6th May 2015, 07:44   #2
KenM
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How about Wheatear?

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Old Wednesday 6th May 2015, 08:00   #3
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Wheatear sounds like a good fit.. especially as its name is a corruption of "white arse" (excuse my language) :)
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Old Wednesday 6th May 2015, 09:43   #4
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Another vote for Wheatear, ploughed fields or short grass is the classic location for them
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Old Wednesday 6th May 2015, 10:35   #5
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Thank you for your suggestions.
Im guessing these would have to be female's or youngsters as they are a very dull brownish colour--do they 'tend' to be in groups of 4-6's?
Ive seen some this week, why is it I have NEVER seen a male in his full glory?
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Old Wednesday 6th May 2015, 11:17   #6
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I had some assistance just last year on the forum with Wheatear id, does this look familiar ?

Jim.
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Old Wednesday 6th May 2015, 12:32   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdxman View Post
Thank you for your suggestions.
Im guessing these would have to be female's or youngsters as they are a very dull brownish colour--do they 'tend' to be in groups of 4-6's?
Ive seen some this week, why is it I have NEVER seen a male in his full glory?
Birdxman
Could well be females and last year's young now (or this year's young, when you see them return in autumn). The adult males usually move through first (late March / early April), and being fit and strong, usually go straight through to the breeding grounds (stony places high in the hills) without needing to stop on the way so much. If you want to see a male 'in his full glory', head for the hills.

Edit: here's a male from 7 April this year
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Old Thursday 7th May 2015, 07:30   #8
Birdxman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmycq View Post
I had some assistance just last year on the forum with Wheatear id, does this look familiar ?

Jim.
Thank you Jimmy, Ive never got close enough for any sort of clear view but your second piccy is certainly the type of view I have seen, the flash of white as it disappears. thanks.
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Old Thursday 7th May 2015, 07:33   #9
Birdxman
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Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
Could well be females and last year's young now (or this year's young, when you see them return in autumn). The adult males usually move through first (late March / early April), and being fit and strong, usually go straight through to the breeding grounds (stony places high in the hills) without needing to stop on the way so much. If you want to see a male 'in his full glory', head for the hills.

Edit: here's a male from 7 April this year
Thanks Nutcracker, not too many hills in the Fen Country (lol) so I guess I wont see him here.
There are quite a few 'females' about here at the moment but I'm guessing from what you say they will be moving on shortly.
Thank you for your help
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Old Tuesday 2nd June 2015, 16:51   #10
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sorry but i need to come back on this one-i've just been out for a walk and seen another hen flitting about the fields.
Given that its June now, why would she still be here (obviously) feeding? Should she not be gone by now to nest?
I'm guessing that the feeding must be good about here for them to say so long in the area and if its that good why haven't I seen a male, if only passing through? (Where do they spend the winter?)
I cant understand why the feeding should be good for the hens and maybe juveniles but not the cocks?
I dont mean to labour on this bird but I am fascinated as to why I see some of them but not others?
I walk the area EVERY day so I would of seen the males if they were here.
Thanks Birdxman
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Old Tuesday 2nd June 2015, 17:07   #11
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Possible that it might be on territory not far away (they used to breed widely in southeast England, before agricultural intensification killed them off), but much more likely a late migrant delaying its migration because of the cold spring.
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