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request for Gull id , Preston UK

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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 16:29   #1
Earnest lad
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request for Gull id , Preston UK

Please can anyone advise or confirm for me the id's of the attached photos
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 16:47   #2
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Herring Gulls.
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 16:53   #3
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Dear Aeshna - Thank you
Please may I ask also: Are these all Herring Gulls too?
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 17:01   #4
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Dear Aeshna - Thank you
Please may I ask also: Are these all Herring Gulls too?
Yes they are
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 17:03   #5
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Yes they are
Thats most helpful thank you. I was hoping against hope for a Common Gull
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 19:00   #6
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Common Gull is much smaller than Herring - closer in size to a Black-headed, though closer to Herring in plumage and structure. One among Herring Gulls should be quite obvious!
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Old Friday 17th January 2020, 23:01   #7
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Common Gull is much smaller than Herring - closer in size to a Black-headed, though closer to Herring in plumage and structure. One among Herring Gulls should be quite obvious!
Thank you for pointing this out. I must go back to Preston Dock and try and pick one out. I am keen to get on to one
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Old Saturday 18th January 2020, 03:28   #8
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Thank you for pointing this out. I must go back to Preston Dock and try and pick one out. I am keen to get on to one
Around here playing fields in the winter seems to be favourite habitat for Common Gull. Much darker back/mantle than Herring.
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Old Monday 20th January 2020, 09:18   #9
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Thank you for pointing this out. I must go back to Preston Dock and try and pick one out. I am keen to get on to one
As aeshna5 says, docks and coastal habitats are not the best for finding Common Gulls. Checking loafing or feeding gull flocks on playing fields, inland reservoirs, country parks with lakes etc is the way to go for finding Common Gulls in winter.

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Old Monday 20th January 2020, 17:48   #10
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Around here playing fields in the winter seems to be favourite habitat for Common Gull. Much darker back/mantle than Herring.
As aeshna5 says, docks and coastal habitats are not the best for finding Common Gulls. Checking loafing or feeding gull flocks on playing fields, inland reservoirs, country parks with lakes etc is the way to go for finding Common Gulls in winter.[/quote]

Thank you both. I dont see many Common Gulls in fields around Bolton or Manchester. Please do you know of any good spots as I am keen to get some photo's. I read online that although it is called "Common" it is in fact not always one of the most commonly seen.
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Old Monday 20th January 2020, 19:53   #11
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As aeshna5 says, docks and coastal habitats are not the best for finding Common Gulls. Checking loafing or feeding gull flocks on playing fields, inland reservoirs, country parks with lakes etc is the way to go for finding Common Gulls in winter.
Thank you both. I dont see many Common Gulls in fields around Bolton or Manchester. Please do you know of any good spots as I am keen to get some photo's. I read online that although it is called "Common" it is in fact not always one of the most commonly seen.[/quote]

Preston Dock is a perfectly good place for Common Gulls in winter. Just wait until the roost / pre-roost forms towards dusk and they join the Black-headed Gulls bathing. There are better options if you want photographs though.
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Old Monday 20th January 2020, 20:07   #12
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Still very common in Northumbs in the winter - generally the most numerous gull (often by a very large margin) in the big inland reservoir gull roosts, e.g. 16,000 at Derwent Reservoir in December 2018.

This is a decline on past numbers though, e.g. 50,000 at Hallington Reservoirs in March 1991 and November 1995, and 48,000 at Derwent Reservoir in December 1998.
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Old Monday 20th January 2020, 20:43   #13
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Thanks everyone.
It seems the eastern counties of the north are more favoured than the nw, but I shall keep a look out in fields if I see gulls feeding when passing in the car.
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Old Monday 20th January 2020, 21:56   #14
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Gulls are nearly always a challenge because they have such a wide variety of plumages for each species. Makes them really interesting. Adults in breeding plumage are relatively easy but you are dealing with non breeding plumage. So size is important. Colour of legs. Beak colour and features and then the plumage. At a quick look you have one bird whicch is still in breeding plumage with white spots on the tail, pink legs and yellow beak with red spot. Herring gull. The others, by and large have pink legs, indeterminate bill colour with a black tip and grey brown mottled colouring. Herring gulls, probably 2nd or 3rd winter birds.
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Old Monday 20th January 2020, 22:10   #15
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Gulls are nearly always a challenge because they have such a wide variety of plumages for each species. Makes them really interesting. Adults in breeding plumage are relatively easy but you are dealing with non breeding plumage. So size is important. Colour of legs. Beak colour and features and then the plumage. At a quick look you have one bird whicch is still in breeding plumage with white spots on the tail, pink legs and yellow beak with red spot. Herring gull. The others, by and large have pink legs, indeterminate bill colour with a black tip and grey brown mottled colouring. Herring gulls, probably 2nd or 3rd winter birds.
I like to get a nice close in shot of a bird then when I get home carefully examine the features such as the ones you mentioned, to try and determine the species. I have been able to get some lifers this way, and I have had quite a few lifers because of help received on this forum to nail an id.
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