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British Counties and their National Firsts

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Old Sunday 21st July 2019, 11:33   #1
Himalaya
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British Counties and their National Firsts

Which counties bagged which British Rare, Scarce Firsts? How expected were they? I know rarities turn up in unexpected locations.

As far as I know my county Lancashire has the first recorded Sociable Plover and First recorded Eleonara's Falcon for Britain. That was a surprise in my eyes as I thought it would most likely have been an American Wader.
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Old Sunday 21st July 2019, 11:55   #2
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Lancashire has also had the first Caspian Reed Warbler, which may get split at some point, and the first accepted Cackling Goose.
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Old Sunday 21st July 2019, 14:37   #3
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Inland counties have to be the most impressive in terms of unexpected national firsts?

Notts has had the first 'accepted' Cedar Waxwing and Redhead, plus, even more remarkably, Egyptian Nightjar.
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Old Sunday 21st July 2019, 17:05   #4
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Notts has had the first 'accepted' Cedar Waxwing.
Presumably we are talking British firsts not English firsts so this doesn't really count.
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Old Sunday 21st July 2019, 17:06   #5
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Northumbs has quite a few, including some old records like the 1st Bluethroat (1826), 1st Yellow-browed Warbler (1838) and 1st (and still only!) Red-necked Nightjar (1856), as well as more recent ones like Aleutian Tern (1979). Don't know if it's a UK first or not, but there's also a 1760s record of Great Auk.

Also of course a World first on Bewick's Swan (1829)
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 11:52   #6
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Northumbs has quite a few, including some old records like the 1st Bluethroat (1826), 1st Yellow-browed Warbler (1838) and 1st (and still only!) Red-necked Nightjar (1856), as well as more recent ones like Aleutian Tern (1979). Don't know if it's a UK first or not, but there's also a 1760s record of Great Auk.

Also of course a World first on Bewick's Swan (1829)
I feel obliged to counter that with County Durham's contribution...

Long-tailed Duck (1661-71); Sooty Shearwater (1828); Pine Grosbeak ('before 1831'); Great Reed Warbler (1847); Arctic Redpoll (1855); Double-crested Cormorant (1989); Amur White Wagtail (ssp. leucopsis) (2005); Eastern Crowned Warbler (2009).

Information from 'A Short History of Durham Ornithology in The Birds of Durham
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 14:11   #7
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I feel obliged to counter that with County Durham's contribution...

Long-tailed Duck (1661-71); Sooty Shearwater (1828); Pine Grosbeak ('before 1831'); Great Reed Warbler (1847); Arctic Redpoll (1855); Double-crested Cormorant (1989); Amur White Wagtail (ssp. leucopsis) (2005); Eastern Crowned Warbler (2009).

Information from 'A Short History of Durham Ornithology in The Birds of Durham
I'll hit back with Common Eider (St. Cuthbert, Farne Islands, c.670)
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 14:23   #8
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Presumably we are talking British firsts not English firsts so this doesn't really count.
It was accepted before the Shetland bird AFAIR which was retrospectively added after the Notts birds hence the emphasis on 'accepted' so yes, it does count.
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 16:20   #9
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It was accepted before the Shetland bird AFAIR which was retrospectively added after the Notts birds hence the emphasis on 'accepted' so yes, it does count.
I am not sure what point you are trying to make Andy. It isn't the first for Britain, the OP was asking about national firsts and it's utterly irrelevant what order they get accepted in.
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 16:27   #10
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I am not sure what point you are trying to make Andy. It isn't the first for Britain, the OP was asking about national firsts and it's utterly irrelevant what order they get accepted in.
Not sure on that - if this were so, then recent archaeological finds from e.g. Roman or pre-Roman times would take precedence over 'traditional' recorded historical firsts. Would you agree with that?
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 17:29   #11
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Not sure on that - if this were so, then recent archaeological finds from e.g. Roman or pre-Roman times would take precedence over 'traditional' recorded historical firsts. Would you agree with that?
Possibly. Do you have an example?
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 17:45   #12
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Possibly. Do you have an example?
I have a feeling I've seen reports of Dalmatian Pelican in sub-fossil deposits.

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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 17:51   #13
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I have a feeling I've seen reports of Dalmatian Pelican in sub-fossil deposits.

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Perfectly ok with saying that wasn't a first then.
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 18:17   #14
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I am not sure what point you are trying to make Andy. It isn't the first for Britain, the OP was asking about national firsts and it's utterly irrelevant what order they get accepted in.
Beg to differ.

Abstract from BB re the Notts bird.

' That much twitched bird stayed for almost a month, and was seen by huge numbers of observers. Peter Smith gave an account of his discovery in Birding World (9:70-73).The Nottingham waxwing’s identification and status as a wild bird were accepted by the British Birds Rarities Committee (Brit. Birds 90: 495) and the British Ornithologists’Union Records Committee (Ibis 140: 182), which led to the reconsideration of the status of the earlier individual, on Noss.

Argue all you like, this was the first accepted bird and certainly the first twitchable, without which, the Noss bird might still be languishing in the 'unproven', box.
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 18:19   #15
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There’s no point arguing with you Andy but a second record is not a first. Over and out.
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 20:27   #16
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See First For Britain and Ireland 1600-1999 by Philip Palmer. Not noticed a table in it but there is probably one in it somewhere. Otherwise just add up the county records.....

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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 21:07   #17
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Can't believe we are discussing what a 'first' is - surely it's simply the earliest accepted record for a given species, regardless of the order the records were accepted? ie not the Notts Cedar Waxwing or the South Stack Black Lark.
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Old Tuesday 23rd July 2019, 21:10   #18
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Perfectly ok with saying that wasn't a first then.
Ah, but in that case it wasn't within the jurisdiction of the BOURC!

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Old Wednesday 24th July 2019, 07:36   #19
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Buckinghamshire has two: Lesser Whitethroat (1787) and Reed Warbler (1785). Philip Palmer's account of the latter contains an error. Essex should be Middlesex.
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Old Wednesday 24th July 2019, 09:06   #20
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Buckinghamshire has two: Lesser Whitethroat (1787) and Reed Warbler (1785). Philip Palmer's account of the latter contains an error. Essex should be Middlesex.
Gender studies seem to have a lengthy pedigree...
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Old Wednesday 24th July 2019, 10:28   #21
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Ca or the South Stack Black Lark.
Although nobody I know believes the Spurn record.

cheers, a
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Old Tuesday 30th July 2019, 20:58   #22
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Yes I read about those in the reports. North American Geese and Ducks is one I would have expected Lancashire to have had a first for Britain in.

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Lancashire has also had the first Caspian Reed Warbler, which may get split at some point, and the first accepted Cackling Goose.
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Old Thursday 1st August 2019, 06:07   #23
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I recall a wing of an Eleonora’s being found prior to the Ainsdale bird although it obviously refers to a moribund record.

Laurie -
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Old Friday 2nd August 2019, 22:09   #24
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Shropshire bagged the first Magnificent Frigatebird
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Old Saturday 3rd August 2019, 00:07   #25
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I recall a wing of an Eleonora’s being found prior to the Ainsdale bird although it obviously refers to a moribund record.

Laurie -
A wing on its own would be well past moribund
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