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Is this a mistle thrush singing? (audio) UK

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Old Wednesday 28th January 2015, 10:18   #1
Joe.S
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Is this a mistle thrush singing? (audio) UK

There were three mistle thrushes up a tree, in front of me, doing their football rattle call. They dispersed- and 30 seconds later I heard this singing but couldn't see the bird.

SO, It stands a chance, and I hope it is, that this a mistle thrush singing?

http://picosong.com/L9r5/
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Old Wednesday 28th January 2015, 10:50   #2
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That's a mistle thrush alright. I have had one calling round my way since just before Christmas...
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Old Wednesday 28th January 2015, 10:51   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe.S View Post
There were three mistle thrushes up a tree, in front of me, doing their football rattle call. They dispersed- and 30 seconds later I heard this singing but couldn't see the bird.

SO, It stands a chance, and I hope it is, that this a mistle thrush singing?

http://picosong.com/L9r5/
Yes, It has the correct "timbre" to my ear Joe, albeit unusually repetitive.

Cheers
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Old Wednesday 28th January 2015, 11:16   #4
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That's good news!

Thank you Steven and Ken

I forgot about the peacock until I heard it again at 16 secs (In someones garden).

Last edited by Joe.S : Wednesday 28th January 2015 at 13:20.
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Old Wednesday 28th January 2015, 20:55   #5
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Yep, Mistle Thrush, though a slightly unusual example.
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Old Wednesday 28th January 2015, 21:40   #6
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Thank you Nutcracker.

It's a theory but perhaps the three of them in a tree top together got them competing for territory (given the time of year) and the result was a slightly forced song. i.e. trying just a bit too hard and not looking at the music sheet.
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Old Thursday 29th January 2015, 16:06   #7
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It may have been an example of conflict song, which is often ultra-crystallised and more simplistic (in ways) than regular crystallised song commonly associated with holding territory/attracting a mate. I seem to recall a recording of this involving Desert Wheatears in the first Sound Approach book, and a short note by Stephen Menzie on a Blackbird giving an ultra-crystallised song in British Birds a few years back. Though I've not read either for a while, and don't have them to hand right now, so I may be misinterpreting somewhat.
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Old Thursday 29th January 2015, 20:46   #8
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HH75 I picked my way through the nomenclature! (learning slowly).

Yesterday I wanted to know if it was a mistle thrush so I cut out a section in audacity. Today I opened the original recording and realised it's quite a bit longer.

It sounds like there is another bird singing in the background, or even competing. It's especially apparent from about 6 seconds to 11 seconds in. Is this another mistle thrush? Does it throw more light on the idea of a conflict song?

longer recording:

http://picosong.com/L5et/

Last edited by Joe.S : Thursday 29th January 2015 at 20:58.
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Old Thursday 29th January 2015, 22:41   #9
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Yep - sounds more 'normal' in the first few seconds of the long recording
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Old Friday 30th January 2015, 09:39   #10
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Thanks for that, Nutcracker.
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