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What Bird Names Would You Change?

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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 09:01   #26
JWN Andrewes
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cantelo View Post
Admittedly Lesser/Greater Yellow-headed Turkey-Vulture would be a bit of a mouthful, but we already happily cope with longer names,
I believe lesser is sometimes called Savannah Vulture, so you could have Savannah Turkey-Vulture and Yellow-headed Turkey-Vulture.

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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 09:09   #27
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Since they're not at all closely related to the 'original' Old World vultures and may not even belong with other Falconiformes at all, I'd re-dub all New World Vultures (other than Condors) Turkey-Vultures.
The proposal (not my own!) of renaming the vultures themselves "Condors" as well solves the long name problem.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 09:14   #28
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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
I've always rather liked Dutch bird names, many of which could surely be absorbed directly into English usage. Some of my favourites...
Ones that I know went down well were Boszanger (it sounds better when pronounced in English than in Dutch!) for (Leaf)-Warbler and Wouw (pronounced Wow!) for Kite.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 09:30   #29
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Originally Posted by Xenospiza View Post
Ones that I know went down well were Boszanger (it sounds better when pronounced in English than in Dutch!) for (Leaf)-Warbler and Wouw (pronounced Wow!) for Kite.
I was always rather fond of Wespendief for Honey Buzzard (wasp thief). Although Honey Buzzard is a quirkily good name too, even if it's not strictly accurate.

I kind of like quirky names for birds, and the stories behind them e.g. Barnacle Goose. I think it would be rather sad if we lost that link to the past just for the sake of accuracy.

The English names of most South American birds are pretty awful and staggeringly unimaginative. Look at a page of Foliage-gleaners and weep! I also find them remarkably hard to remember (e.g. Was it Chestnut-crowned or Chestnut-capped Foliage-gleaner I saw?). I'm struck by how rare onomatopoeic names are for Neotropical birds, despite the fact that most of the birds are much more readily noticed (and often identified) by their sounds. I suppose that's what comes from birds being named by scientists looking at collections rather than by people who encounter birds in the field.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 10:14   #30
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Although I particularly like Kwikstaart for Wagtail, perhaps an even better name would be Splitvogel.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 10:26   #31
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Originally Posted by maltese falcon View Post
Fan-tailed warbler
Zitting Cisticola

Fan-tailed Cisticola

just my opinion
The wife and I just call them Zitters; but all dipper species have long been Zippers (after the calls).
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 11:10   #32
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Pimpelmees = Blue Tit
Koolmees = Great Tit

How wonderful!
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 12:06   #33
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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
I've always rather liked Dutch bird names, many of which could surely be absorbed directly into English usage. Some of my favourites...
  • Wulp = Curlew
The Scots name is Whaup.

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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 14:19   #34
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American Black Duck doesn't look so black to me :S I would change it to "brown".
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 14:26   #35
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I'd like to rename the blackbird. Yes, they're black (well, the males are at least) and they're birds, but it's not exactly imaginative is it? I think I'd call them the Garden Ouzel.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 14:31   #36
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Originally Posted by Seatallen View Post
I'd like to rename the blackbird. Yes, they're black (well, the males are at least) and they're birds, but it's not exactly imaginative is it? I think I'd call them the Garden Ouzel.
Like that Seatallen - nice name and for a 'lovely' bird that deserves to be named as such

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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 16:22   #37
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Sandwich Tern and Dartford Warbler surely deserve a name change. After all these birds are not confined to Kent. Any suggestions?

Si.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 16:40   #38
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Originally Posted by Monahawk View Post
Sandwich Tern and Dartford Warbler surely deserve a name change. After all these birds are not confined to Kent. Any suggestions?

Si.
I would like Gorse Warbler (or actually Gorse Sylvia). It (often) lives in gorse and just like gorse it can't survive severe frost.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 17:40   #39
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any sensible birder already calls semipalmated plovers semi plovers, and same for the sandpiper. i suppose i would rename the european blackbird the black thrush to clear up the confusion with the icterid blackbirds on this side of the pond. maybe the american robin could be the lawn-thrush, and all the other new world turdus thrushes (clay colored robin, rufous backed robin, etc.) should have name changes as well. suggestions?
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 17:43   #40
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American Black Duck doesn't look so black to me :S I would change it to "brown".
or the mallard could be called the northern mallard, and the black and mottled ducks could be the "black mallard" and "mottled mallard".
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 18:07   #41
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All of the New World robins (except for American and Rufous-backed) have been renamed thrushes, part of an AOU update a few years back.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 18:44   #42
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Originally Posted by Monahawk View Post
Sandwich Tern and Dartford Warbler surely deserve a name change. After all these birds are not confined to Kent. Any suggestions?

Si.
I would throw Kentish Plover into the same mix - perhaps in a British context Dawlish Plover or Ferrybridge Plover is more appropriate.
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Old Sunday 27th November 2011, 19:46   #43
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The New World warblers could use an overhaul, especially all those species with misleading place names: Connecticut, Kentucky, Nashville, Tennessee, and Cape May Warblers. Some possible alternatives: Masked Warbler (Kentucky), Orange-cheeked Warbler (Cape May), Gray-hooded Warbler (Nashville), and Invisible Warbler (Connecticut) Oh yes, and Louisiana Waterthrush- maybe Southern Waterthrush (meh, boring but accurate), River Warbler, Stream Warbler, etc.

And the Orange-crowned Warbler should be called the Drab Warbler. Or Field-markless Warbler Prairie Warbler = Scrub Warbler. and Palm Warbler = anything else! maybe Spruce Warbler, Boreal Warbler, Rufous-capped Tail-pumper?

Of course this is all in good fun, a name is a name and not a description- however I do really dislike the recent name AOU name change of Common Moorhen following the split of the New World and Old World forms... Common Moorhen in the old, Common Gallinule in the new. Why? Seems unnecessarily confusing, why not just boring ol' American and Eurasian Moorhens? Or even American vs. Common Moorhens (since the "Eurasian" species also occurs in Africa).
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Old Monday 28th November 2011, 00:17   #44
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How about Reedlichtieburdy for European Robin? (Sorry, it's an Arbroath joke)
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Nice, but a bit obscure

How about naming Housemartin the Gable End bird?

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Old Monday 28th November 2011, 09:22   #45
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Nice, but a bit obscure How about naming Housemartin the Gable End bird?
You've gone a' international noo! (Montrose FC are known as the Gable Endies). Delichon monsroseum?
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Old Monday 28th November 2011, 09:28   #46
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After seeing a Purple Swamphen...not really the most fitting name for a bird at all.

Now to me that is a name that is not very flattering at all. How about Greater green backed Moorhen LOL

Never seen a purple bird yet LOL

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Old Monday 28th November 2011, 10:23   #47
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Kentish plover is another strange choice for name maybe something like Rocky plover
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Old Monday 28th November 2011, 13:25   #48
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Ring-billed Duck for Ring-necked.
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Old Monday 28th November 2011, 13:50   #49
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I will second that black-headed gull is probably the biggest misnomer in English. Chocolate-headed gull sounds like a good alternative (with a slight change to the proposal from D)

Once that has been accepted, we could then rename mediterranean gull to Black-headed, so that it fits with both the rest of Europe and with the scientific name ...

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Old Monday 28th November 2011, 14:47   #50
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Ring-billed Duck for Ring-necked.
This. If you haven't seen a Ring-"necked" Duck, then let me say that near invisible brown neck collar is downright hard to see. Compared to the white bands on the bill, it's like trying a specific star in the sky.
I keep calling them Ring-billed by accident as well. Change the name and it will not be an accident anymore.

And Ovenbird, I don't think the Cape May would be the same with a name change! Nor would any of those others.

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