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Motacillidae

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Old Friday 5th February 2016, 07:12   #1
Richard Klim
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Motacillidae

Guallar & Figuerola (in press). Factors influencing the evolution of moult in the non-breeding season: insights from the family Motacillidae. Biol J Linn Soc. [abstract] [supp info]
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Old Wednesday 27th July 2016, 15:23   #2
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Anthus hodgsoni

Ping Sun, Chenling Zhang, Mujia Pang, Lifu Qian, Tao Pan, Hui Wang & Baowei Zhang (2016) The complete mitochondrial genome of Anthus hodgsoni (Passeriformes: Motacillidae), Mitochondrial DNA Part B, 1:1, 504-505, DOI: 10.1080/23802359.2016.1192507

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Old Monday 17th July 2017, 20:05   #3
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Neotropical pipits

Van Els, P. and Norambuena, H. V. (), A revision of species limits in Neotropical pipits Anthus based on multilocus genetic and vocal data. Ibis. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1111/ibi.12511

Abstract:

Previous investigations of the systematics of Neotropical pipits Anthus revealed multiple cases of paraphyly. We revise the species limits of this group based on sequence data of mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear genes (ACOI9, MB, FGB5) from 39 tissue samples of all 22 subspecies-level taxa in the New World Anthus clade, as well as analysis of display song. We found that Anthus lutescens peruvianus is not part of Yellowish Pipit Anthus lutescens genetically or vocally; thus, we elevate peruvianus to species rank (Peruvian Pipit). Anthus lutescens abariensis Chubb (1921a) should be placed in synonymy with A. l. parvus (instead of A. l. lutescens), at least until further morphological or vocal data becomes available. Paramo Pipit A. bogotensis is likewise paraphyletic, with meridae sister to all other bogotensis subspecies and also to Hellmayr's Pipit A. hellmayri. However, placement of the taxon is based on a relatively short stretch of mitochondrial DNA, and further data are needed. Andean populations of Short-billed Pipit A. furcatus are split as Puna Pipit A. brevirostris, based on genetic and vocal data. South Georgia Pipit A. antarcticus is, at least genetically, part of Correndera Pipit A. correndera, and we recommend considering it a subspecies of Correndera Pipit, in line with the taxonomy of other morphologically distinct but genetically little-differentiated insular bird taxa.
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Old Thursday 10th August 2017, 19:29   #4
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Harris, Alström, Ödeen, Leaché (2017). Discordance between genomic divergence and phenotypic variation in a rapidly evolving avian genus (Motacilla). Pre-Print
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Old Friday 8th December 2017, 07:48   #5
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Yellow and Citrine Wagtails

Sergei V. Drovetski, Andrew B. Reeves, Yaroslav A. Red'kin, Igor V. Fadeev, Evgeniy A. Koblik, Vladimir N. Sotnikov, Gary Voelker. Multi-locus reassessment of a striking discord between mtDNA gene trees and taxonomy across two congeneric species complexes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 7 December 2017.

Abstract:

Resolving relationships among members of the yellow and citrine wagtail species complexes is among the greatest challenges in avian systematics due to arguably the most dramatic disagreements between traditional taxonomy and mtDNA phylogeny. Each species complex is divided into three geographically cohesive mtDNA clades. Each clade from one species complex has a sister from the other complex. Furthermore, one cross-complex pair is more distantly related to the remaining two pairs than are several other wagtail species. To test mtDNA gene tree topology, we sequenced the mtDNA ND2 gene and 11 nuclear introns for seven wagtail species. Our mtDNA gene tree reconstruction supported the results of previous studies, thereby confirming the disagreement between mtDNA phylogeny and taxonomy. However, our multi-locus species tree which used mtDNA clades as “taxa” was consistent with traditional taxonomy regardless of whether mtDNA was included in the analysis or not. Our multi-locus data suggest that despite the presence of strongly supported, geographically structured mtDNA variation, the mtDNA gene tree misrepresents the evolutionary history of the yellow and citrine wagtail complexes. This mito-nuclear discord results from mtDNA representing the biogeographic, but not evolutionary history of these recently radiated Palearctic wagtails.
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Old Friday 8th December 2017, 11:18   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Sergei V. Drovetski, Andrew B. Reeves, Yaroslav A. Red'kin, Igor V. Fadeev, Evgeniy A. Koblik, Vladimir N. Sotnikov, Gary Voelker. Multi-locus reassessment of a striking discord between mtDNA gene trees and taxonomy across two congeneric species complexes. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 7 December 2017.

Abstract:

Resolving relationships among members of the yellow and citrine wagtail species complexes is among the greatest challenges in avian systematics due to arguably the most dramatic disagreements between traditional taxonomy and mtDNA phylogeny. Each species complex is divided into three geographically cohesive mtDNA clades. Each clade from one species complex has a sister from the other complex. Furthermore, one cross-complex pair is more distantly related to the remaining two pairs than are several other wagtail species. To test mtDNA gene tree topology, we sequenced the mtDNA ND2 gene and 11 nuclear introns for seven wagtail species. Our mtDNA gene tree reconstruction supported the results of previous studies, thereby confirming the disagreement between mtDNA phylogeny and taxonomy. However, our multi-locus species tree which used mtDNA clades as “taxa” was consistent with traditional taxonomy regardless of whether mtDNA was included in the analysis or not. Our multi-locus data suggest that despite the presence of strongly supported, geographically structured mtDNA variation, the mtDNA gene tree misrepresents the evolutionary history of the yellow and citrine wagtail complexes. This mito-nuclear discord results from mtDNA representing the biogeographic, but not evolutionary history of these recently radiated Palearctic wagtails.
Again showing why mtDNA is not very good at resolving species level relationships. These discordant results explain, in part, the frequent reluctance the AOS NACC to endorse certain splits (Green-winged/Common Teal for instance) adopted by others.
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Old Friday 8th December 2017, 13:03   #7
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This mito-nuclear discord results from mtDNA representing the biogeographic, but not evolutionary history of these recently radiated Palearctic wagtails.
What is actually meant by this, the last sentence of the abstract? It does not seem very clear to me.

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Old Friday 8th December 2017, 13:59   #8
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What is actually meant by this, the last sentence of the abstract? It does not seem very clear to me. Niels
Niels,
Harris et al 2017, in my reading, emphasising the inadequacy of using only mtDNA data to interpret the physical distribution of yellow/citrine wagtail taxa, also allude to the confusing effect, where plumage characteristics traditionally assigned to a taxon being discordant with the distribution of 'taxa' defined by a suite of other DNA techniques, but in a different way to Drovetski et al 2017.

Harris et al have shone a light on the metaphorical 'mud' obscuring our understanding of these taxa, perhaps only to the extent that the 'mud' is now better understood, but our understanding of the taxa relationships has advanced only slightly.

I cede the floor to those more knowledgeable than myself!
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Old Friday 8th December 2017, 14:08   #9
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I guess what it'll mean in the listing sense is that Western & Eastern Yellow Wags will be put back together as one species?
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Old Friday 8th December 2017, 14:19   #10
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What is actually meant by this, the last sentence of the abstract? It does not seem very clear to me.

Niels
Mitochondria do not recombine, so it's possible for mitochondrial lineages to enter into a species via hybridisation and even completely replace the original taxa's mitochondria. Off the top of my head, this has been shown to have happened in two newt species in Central Europe (Lissotriton vulgaris and L. montandoni) where L. montandoni mitochondrial lineages have become extinct. Therefore, as others have said, just using mitochondrial markers can be problematic when there is still gene-flow between species.
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Old Friday 8th December 2017, 18:01   #11
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Thanks for the answers. Statements such as the inadequacy of mitochondrial markers, etc, I think fit with previous sentences of the abstract. What I have difficulty with is the biogeography being explained but the evolution not by the M. DNA. Maybe the meaning would become clear after reading the entire paper (I have not tried getting my hands on it so do not know if it is possible) -- but as written, is the last sentence more than just hot air?

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Old Saturday 9th December 2017, 09:31   #12
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Originally Posted by njlarsen View Post
Thanks for the answers. Statements such as the inadequacy of mitochondrial markers, etc, I think fit with previous sentences of the abstract. What I have difficulty with is the biogeography being explained but the evolution not by the M. DNA. Maybe the meaning would become clear after reading the entire paper (I have not tried getting my hands on it so do not know if it is possible) -- but as written, is the last sentence more than just hot air?

Niels
It's probably explained more in the main text. I've not read it fully yet, but it doesn't seem like hot air to me
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Old Saturday 9th December 2017, 16:38   #13
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Thanks for the answers. Statements such as the inadequacy of mitochondrial markers, etc, I think fit with previous sentences of the abstract. What I have difficulty with is the biogeography being explained but the evolution not by the M. DNA. Maybe the meaning would become clear after reading the entire paper (I have not tried getting my hands on it so do not know if it is possible) -- but as written, is the last sentence more than just hot air?

Niels
I haven't read the paper, but what I think it means that mtDNA sharing is more likely where non-sister symaptric taxa are "available" for hybridization. I think this happens frequently in gulls, where North American taxa tend to cluster together in mtDNA trees because of hybridization with other North American taxa, not because of shared ancestry (e,g, North American Herring Gull is not even close to European Herring Gull, even although adults are almost identical). Thus the tree represents biogeography not evolution.

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Old Saturday 9th December 2017, 16:50   #14
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Thanks Andy,

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Old Tuesday 12th December 2017, 09:37   #15
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Motacilla

Rebecca B. Harris, Per Alström, Anders Ödeen, Adam D. Leaché. Discordance between genomic divergence and phenotypic variation in a rapidly evolving avian genus (Motacilla). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 12 December 2017.

Abstract:

Generally, genotypes and phenotypes are expected to be spatially congruent; however, in widespread species complexes with few barriers to dispersal, multiple contact zones, and limited reproductive isolation, discordance between phenotypes and phylogeographic groups is more probable. Wagtails (Motacilla) are a genus of birds with striking plumage pattern variation across the Old World. Up to 13 subspecies are recognized within a single species, yet previous studies using mitochondrial DNA have supported polyphyletic phylogeographic groups that are inconsistent with subspecies plumage characteristics. In this study, we investigate the link between phenotypes and genotype by taking a phylogenetic approach. We use genome-wide SNPs, nuclear introns, and mitochondrial DNA to estimate population structure, isolation by distance, and species relationships. Together, our genetic sampling includes complete species-level sampling and comprehensive coverage of the three most phenotypically diverse Palearctic species. Our study provides strong evidence for species-level patterns of differentiation, however population-level differentiation is less pronounced. SNPs provide a robust estimate of species-level relationships, which are mostly corroborated by a combined analysis of mtDNA and nuclear introns (the first time-calibrated species tree for the genus). However, the mtDNA tree is strongly incongruent and is considered to misrepresent the species phylogeny. The extant wagtail lineages originated during the Pliocene and the Eurasian lineage underwent rapid diversification during the Pleistocene. Three of four widespread Eurasian species exhibit an east-west divide that contradicts both subspecies taxonomy and phenotypic variation. Indeed, SNPs fail to distinguish between phenotypically distinct subspecies within the M. alba and M. flava complexes, and instead support geographical regions, each of which is home to two or more different looking subspecies. This is a major step towards our understanding of wagtail phylogeny compared to previous analyses of fewer species and considerably less sequence data.
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Old Tuesday 12th December 2017, 12:25   #16
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Rebecca B. Harris, Per Alström, Anders Ödeen, Adam D. Leaché. Discordance between genomic divergence and phenotypic variation in a rapidly evolving avian genus (Motacilla). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 12 December 2017.

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Same as post #4? Any difference?
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Old Tuesday 12th December 2017, 12:55   #17
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Same as post #4? Any difference?
It was preprint on arXiv. Now it's reviewed and accepted in a journal.
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Old Tuesday 12th December 2017, 14:44   #18
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It was preprint on arXiv. Now it's reviewed and accepted in a journal.
Thanks!
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Old Wednesday 27th December 2017, 06:54   #19
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Anthus peruvianus, A. brevirostris

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Van Els, P. and Norambuena, H. V. (), A revision of species limits in Neotropical pipits Anthus based on multilocus genetic and vocal data. Ibis. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1111/ibi.12511

Abstract:

Previous investigations of the systematics of Neotropical pipits Anthus revealed multiple cases of paraphyly. We revise the species limits of this group based on sequence data of mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear genes (ACOI9, MB, FGB5) from 39 tissue samples of all 22 subspecies-level taxa in the New World Anthus clade, as well as analysis of display song. We found that Anthus lutescens peruvianus is not part of Yellowish Pipit Anthus lutescens genetically or vocally; thus, we elevate peruvianus to species rank (Peruvian Pipit). Anthus lutescens abariensis Chubb (1921a) should be placed in synonymy with A. l. parvus (instead of A. l. lutescens), at least until further morphological or vocal data becomes available. Paramo Pipit A. bogotensis is likewise paraphyletic, with meridae sister to all other bogotensis subspecies and also to Hellmayr's Pipit A. hellmayri. However, placement of the taxon is based on a relatively short stretch of mitochondrial DNA, and further data are needed. Andean populations of Short-billed Pipit A. furcatus are split as Puna Pipit A. brevirostris, based on genetic and vocal data. South Georgia Pipit A. antarcticus is, at least genetically, part of Correndera Pipit A. correndera, and we recommend considering it a subspecies of Correndera Pipit, in line with the taxonomy of other morphologically distinct but genetically little-differentiated insular bird taxa.
IOC Updates Diary Dec 21

Accept split of Puna Pipit from Short-billed Pipit

Accept split of Peruvian Pipit from Yellowish Pipit
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Old Wednesday 10th January 2018, 07:56   #20
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Anthus brevirostris, A. peruvianus

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Van Els, P. and Norambuena, H. V. (), A revision of species limits in Neotropical pipits Anthus based on multilocus genetic and vocal data. Ibis. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1111/ibi.12511

Abstract:

Previous investigations of the systematics of Neotropical pipits Anthus revealed multiple cases of paraphyly. We revise the species limits of this group based on sequence data of mitochondrial (ND2) and nuclear genes (ACOI9, MB, FGB5) from 39 tissue samples of all 22 subspecies-level taxa in the New World Anthus clade, as well as analysis of display song. We found that Anthus lutescens peruvianus is not part of Yellowish Pipit Anthus lutescens genetically or vocally; thus, we elevate peruvianus to species rank (Peruvian Pipit). Anthus lutescens abariensis Chubb (1921a) should be placed in synonymy with A. l. parvus (instead of A. l. lutescens), at least until further morphological or vocal data becomes available. Paramo Pipit A. bogotensis is likewise paraphyletic, with meridae sister to all other bogotensis subspecies and also to Hellmayr's Pipit A. hellmayri. However, placement of the taxon is based on a relatively short stretch of mitochondrial DNA, and further data are needed. Andean populations of Short-billed Pipit A. furcatus are split as Puna Pipit A. brevirostris, based on genetic and vocal data. South Georgia Pipit A. antarcticus is, at least genetically, part of Correndera Pipit A. correndera, and we recommend considering it a subspecies of Correndera Pipit, in line with the taxonomy of other morphologically distinct but genetically little-differentiated insular bird taxa.
Proposal (764) to SACC

Recognize Anthus brevirostris as a separate species from Anthus furcatus

Proposal (765) to SACC

Recognize Anthus peruvianus as a separate species from Anthus lutescens
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Old Monday 29th January 2018, 07:43   #21
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TiF Update January 28

Wagtails and Pipits: The Wagtails have been rearranged based on Drovetski et al. (2018) and Harris et al. (2018).

Based on Van Ells and Norambuena (2018), the New World Pipits have been rearranged. Futher, two species have been split and one has been lumped.

Peruvian Pipit, Anthus peruvianus, has been split from Yellowish Pipit, Anthus lutescens
Puna Pipit, Anthus brevirostris, has been split from Short-billed Pipit, Anthus furcatus.
South Georgia Pipit, Anthus antarcticus, has been lumped into Correndera Pipit, Anthus correndera due to very small DNA differences between them.
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Old Friday 6th April 2018, 19:03   #22
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Anthus peruvianus

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Proposal (765) to SACC

Recognize Anthus peruvianus as a separate species from Anthus lutescens
PASSED (6 April 2018)
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Old Monday 16th April 2018, 19:19   #23
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Sao Tome Shorttail

IOC Updates Diary Apr 16

Move Sao Tome Shorttail to Motacilla
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Old Thursday 19th April 2018, 19:42   #24
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IOC Updates Diary Apr 16

Move Sao Tome Shorttail to Motacilla
What is the sister species of the Sao Tome Shorttail within Motacilla?
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Old Thursday 19th April 2018, 19:46   #25
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What is the sister species of the Sao Tome Shorttail within Motacilla?
Motacilla flaviventris
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