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Nomina mystica or Nomina deliria ... !?

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Old Thursday 7th June 2018, 19:34   #51
njlarsen
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His true name? Who knows? If there was/is such a thing as "true", when it comes to spelling in the late 1600-hundreds.
In Danish writings from that period, there was no set spelling of names from what I have seen.

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Old Thursday 7th June 2018, 20:49   #52
l_raty
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Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
If a synonym of today's Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus or the Barn Owl Tyto alba is all unknown to me. Is it possible to tell either way by Brehm's description?
A Barn Owl it is. Strix at that date was universally used for barn owls. "Schleiereule" in German is Barn Owl. The Latin diagnosis indicates a bird with flavescent upperparts and immaculate white underparts. Last, Short-eared Owl is "Die kurzörige Eule" Brachiotos palustris on the next page.
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Old Thursday 7th June 2018, 20:56   #53
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Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
No. 25, from page 210: "[Merops] chaddaejr. Forsk. 102"
[According to Rey (No. 102); a synonym of today's Blue-cheeked Bee-eater Merops persicus]

... as far as I know this ought to be The Bee-eater described by Peter Forsskål in 1775, as: "Merops ægyptius, totus viridis, gula flava, ..." (here), which (as I understand it) is not a binomial name, simply a description, in Latin ... whith the additional info; its Arabian name: "Chaddæjr."

I´ve seen no trace of it being used as a scientific ditto! Has it?
MEROPS ÆEGYPTIUS (the genus name followed by a word singled-out by the use of small capitals, the rest of the diagnosis being in lower case italics) is a binomen. Chaddæjr is indeed just the Arabian local name.
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Old Thursday 7th June 2018, 21:32   #54
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Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
No. 35, from page 223: "[Picus] baskiriensis. Verr. 86"
[According to Rey (No. 86); a synonym of "Picus numidicus", which to me must be today's subspecies (Algerian) Great Spotted Woodpecker Dendrocopos major numidus]

I have no idea where, or if, Verreaux (alt. Bonaparte?) truly ever used this name. In any case it´s also mentioned, listed as a synonym, by Dresser (here). Could it be a Woodpecker from the Basque Country (Baskien, in Swedish)? Or from the Bashkiri Steppes, of south-western Russia.
Bonaparte cited it in his Conspectus volucrum zygodactylorum [here]. (This is what Dresser is citing in the link you provided.)
Malherbe also commented on this bird [here]:
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Je possède dans ma collection le pic que MM. Verreaux ont reçu du pays des Baskirs et qu’ils ont nommé picus Baskiriensis ; j’ai pu me convaincre, après une comparaison minutieuse, que c’était bien un jeune mâle du picus major.
(I have in my collection the woodpecker that Messrs. Verreaux received from the country of the Baskirs and that they named picus Baskiriensis ; I could convince myself, after a detailed comparison, that it was indeed a young male of the picus major.)
A bird is labelled 'Baskiriensis' on his [Plate XVI] (the #4).
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Old Thursday 7th June 2018, 21:47   #55
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Where "Messerschm" (whomever he was) described is as such is all unknown to me!
Almost certainly Daniel Gottlieb Messerschmidt (1685-1735).
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Old Friday 8th June 2018, 14:22   #56
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Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
No. 3, from page 172: "[Astur] polyoparejus. Heugl. (X?X ad.) 22"
[According to Rey (No. 22); a synonym of today's Levant Sparrowhawk Accipiter brevipes]

... no idea where, or based on what, this name originated.

And what symbol is that? A tilted/Up-side-down Male?
= "Accipiter polioparejus" nobis, HEUGLIN 1862 (here)

Yet another typo/error by Rey! However not included in today's HBW Alive Key!
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Old Friday 8th June 2018, 14:27   #57
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= "Accipiter polioparejus" nobis, HEUGLIN 1862 (here)

Yet another typo/error by Rey! However not included in today's HBW Alive Key!
Not as such, but a mere variant of polioparea / poliopareia.
Additionally, spelled poliopareius on the first page of the paper where the name was introduced (*): [here] -- the 'j' was presumably a typo. (Not only Brehm and Rey make typos... )

(*) By Hartlaub, though.

Last edited by l_raty : Friday 8th June 2018 at 14:40.
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Old Friday 8th June 2018, 14:41   #58
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Fair enough Laurent; "Accipiter poliopareius" it is (on p.417). By Hartlaub.

I stand corrected!

There's a lot of errors out there (and here) ...
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Old Tuesday 12th June 2018, 16:58   #59
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No. 1, from page 163: [Acnemius (sic)] "gymnopodius. Gray. 67"
[According to Rey (No. 67); a synonym of today's (Eurasian) Scops owl Otus scops]
gymnopodius is of the greek origin Γυμνοπους; γυμνός means naked, bare and πούς means foot, hence barefoot.

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● No. 4, from page 173: "[Botaurus] fretihudsonis. Briss. 456"
[According to Rey (No. 456); a synonym of today's American bittern Botaurus lentiginosus]
Freti(fretī) is genetive singular of fretum which means strait, channel or sea in latin. So it is either "of Hudson strait" or "of Hudson bay" but bay should be sinum or sinus, then Hudson strait is more semantically accurate.
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Old Tuesday 12th June 2018, 17:39   #60
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Originally Posted by Calalp View Post
but could Rey have been aiming for "Curruca nana" HEMPRICH & EHRENBERG 1833? A double typo!?! And even if so, the latter is today's (Asian) Desert Warbler (Curruca) Sylvia nana ... !? Or what bird is manca?
manca is feminine singular form of mancus which means infirm, defective. Could this be relatable with nana that means midget, dwarf?
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Old Tuesday 12th June 2018, 20:39   #61
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I have trawled through Rey 1872 (see #37) and, as suspected, found that it is full of spelling errors. Happily, most of them can be resolved by reference to the author names supplied by Rey. The generic misspellings have found their way into the Key, as have some 'new' specific names and various gross mistakes. I have not included variant eponyms (i.e. ending -ii instead of -i, and vice versa) and obvious erreurs de frappe. So you may now freely check yet more names in the Key (and even more after I return from Tring).
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Old Wednesday 13th June 2018, 12:00   #62
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Originally Posted by Werzik View Post
manca is feminine singular form of mancus which means infirm, defective. Could this be relatable with nana that means midget, dwarf?
"Curruca manca ? Erhenb." was cited in the synonymy of his Pyrophthalma melanocephala by Bonaparte in 1850 - https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/43560444 - thus this one does not appear to be a creation of Rey.
Hard to make a guess without knowing the original context, imho.

(Maybe totally irrelevant, but perhaps worth keeping in mind: MelANoCephalA.)

Last edited by l_raty : Wednesday 13th June 2018 at 12:06.
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Old Wednesday 13th June 2018, 18:51   #63
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Hi,

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Originally Posted by Werzik View Post
gymnopodius is of the greek origin Γυμνοπους; γυμνός means naked, bare and πούς means foot, hence barefoot.
Possibly, this name was chosen to contrast with the German trivial name of Aegolius funereus, "Rauhfußkauz", which translates as "fur-footed owl".

The similarly named "Rauhfußbussard," Buteo lagopus, echoes this concept.

Regards,

Henning
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