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How many escape species have you encountered over the years in your garden?

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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 16:15   #1
KenM
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How many escape species have you encountered over the years in your garden?

Over 47 years at two addresses (N.E.London), I've encountered four species, one at my first address (12 years), and three at my current (35 years). Be good to know if there is a mean average over the years, it appears that it's one every c12 years for me, wonder how it might compare to others?

Species encountered were a Cardinal species (?), a non Northern hemisphere finch species, a Harris Hawk and an Alexandrine Parakeet.

Whether it might be of any use as a comparison stat. against any putative extralimital vagrant claims possibly not, however it might function as a measure of sorts....dunno?

Obviously anybody living next door to, or in the immediate vicinity of a lax bird importer might just skew the average, however fwiw I certainly can't lay claim to any such proximity.

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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 16:30   #2
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Three in twenty years, Hill Myna, Cockatiel and Budgie so no likelihood of vagrancy with any of mine.


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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 16:46   #3
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One in 15 years: Cockatiel.

However, at work, a Cockatiel and a Zebra Finch at one office, and a Steppe Eagle out of the window of another in Central London.

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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 17:40   #4
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One Budgie.
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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 18:55   #5
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6 in 16 years in central Cambridge:
2 cockatiels, 1 budgie, 1 canary, 1 waxbill and 1 purple glossy starling

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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 19:23   #6
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Peahen and Guinea Fowl in 23 years. The first a flyover, the second a semi-resident!
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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 19:43   #7
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Don't know how many years Dave's Budgie represents?

However...Farnboro John's escapes change the dynamic slightly, substituting work place for garden, fair enough after all most of us have probably spent more time at work than garden, thus a reasonable comparison.

Mr.p is currently in the lead with c2.5 escapes per annum! (clearly central Cambridge...bit of a hot spot!) Andy with circa 1 every 6.5 years, with me not quite clutching the "wooden spoon" as Farnboro John's 1 in 15 yrs!

Don't know where this might end up, but it might throw up some regional preferences for the keeping of cagebirds.....keep em coming guys.
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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 19:46   #8
Jos Stratford
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One in 20 years, a Budgie.

But given the winters here, hardly surprising that escapes don't tend to do that well.


Actually, if I remember well, even away from my garden I have only ever seen two other escapes in all the time I have lived in Lithuania.
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Old Sunday 11th March 2018, 20:11   #9
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 04:04   #10
Jos Stratford
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC Foggin View Post
Well in 14 years I've had 116 species in my backyard, which borders on a creek and is surrounded by trees
116 species of escape? Maybe you misread the question of this thread? 😊
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 06:44   #11
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Budgie and African Grey Parrot! (Over the 20 or so years I lived on School campus).
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 07:19   #12
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So far Budgies appear to be the most numerous (praps not surprising), although I'd have thought that compared to yesteryear (50's/60's) captive birds would have been much more numerous as escapes. Cambridge very much in the lead at present, although that could change, as I'd have thought that there might just be other areas with a not dissimilar yield or return.....?

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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 09:30   #13
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Three I can think of for me:

Budgie
Some kind of medium sized green parrot (too long ago to remember enough details to ID)
the local feral Harris Hawk that hangs out with the Red Kites flies over occassionally
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 09:58   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jos Stratford View Post
One in 20 years, a Budgie.

But given the winters here, hardly surprising that escapes don't tend to do that well.


Actually, if I remember well, even away from my garden I have only ever seen two other escapes in all the time I have lived in Lithuania.

Cockatiel in Russia two years ago so I'm winning the Russian list!



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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 10:29   #15
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Nothing at current address (21 yrs) but previous address (still in Leicester 11 years) I had three budgies in a single "flock" for two days running. No idea where they came from or went to. Can only presume somebody left their aviary door open and then recaptured them.

Also I had a pair of mallard that belonged to a near neighbor wander into the front garden after they got out of their run (he kept them with chickens at the bottom of his garden.)

I presume that racing pigeons don't count.
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 14:05   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Longland View Post
Nothing at current address (21 yrs) but previous address (still in Leicester 11 years) I had three budgies in a single "flock" for two days running. No idea where they came from or went to. Can only presume somebody left their aviary door open and then recaptured them.
I hadn’t bargained for a multiple occurrence record Paul...just goes to show how easy it is to lose presumed aviary “held” birds.

Budgerigars still in the lead! Thought that there might have been a greater diversity of species over a more diverse area so far...time might tell?
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 15:02   #17
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3 Cockatiels over the years, and one each Budgie and Canary nearby (within 1 km of home) - but that's it.

Edit - oh, and a Buteo (sp.), possibly Red-shouldered Hawk, high over once.
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 15:44   #18
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Had a Plum-headed Parakeet for a few weeks a little while back, some years back had a a pair of Senegal Parrots visiting the feeders then one disappeared but one came on + off for c18 months + have seen Harris Hawk from but not in the garden. At a previous address had a Yellow-fronted Canary for a few months coming to a feeder + seen at least a couple of flyover Cockatiels.
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 15:48   #19
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So far 11 Cockatiels, 10 Budgies and 2 Canaries (if my maths are right), must say I'm surprised at the ratios, thinking that Canaries would have been lying 2nd and Cockatiels not even in the first three! With a further 17 other species reported.

I'd have thought perhaps more seedeaters...Waxbills and the like, seeing as these would be presumably easier to keep than other species.....?

Last edited by KenM : Monday 12th March 2018 at 15:50. Reason: Cross posted
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 15:49   #20
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Salford in the 80’s I had Diamond dove, 2 Zebra finches, a flyover falconers bird with jessies, and a parakeet sp. There were lots of aviaries in my area and I saw lots of escapes nearby (Silver Pheasant, Waxbill etc).

In London I’ve seen Alexandrine parakeet, an unidentified Parakeet and a budgie.
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 16:27   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KenM View Post
So far 11 Cockatiels, 10 Budgies and 2 Canaries (if my maths are right), must say I'm surprised at the ratios, thinking that Canaries would have been lying 2nd and Cockatiels not even in the first three!
Cockatiels are more intelligent, and have stronger bills than most other cagebirds, = greater will to escape, and greater ability to carry it out?
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 18:57   #22
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In 39 years at this address I've had one budgie, a pet jackdaw escaped from a property about 200 yards down the road, two guineafowl, although these were not really escapes but released with pheasants by a neighbouring farmer. They used to roost in my trees for a while. They were both female and lasted eighteen months before being taken by a fox while trying to incubate a clutch of eggs. Finally on spring bank holiday 2014 a black kite. I got a little excited when it flew over but later it perched in the top of a tree and I saw the leg rings matched an escaped bird previously seen in suffolk.
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 19:07   #23
KenM
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Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
Cockatiels are more intelligent, and have stronger bills than most other cagebirds, = greater will to escape, and greater ability to carry it out?
Presumably they get locked up more often because of their propensity to Cocka-steal...

When I was a lad...Budgies were the only affordable piece of "flying exotica" that the average Joe could afford, how times have changed, they appear to have been run to 2nd place by presumably more expensive Cockatiels! Who knows what the next 50 years will bring......
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 20:22   #24
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4 species of parrot and an australian white eye in 19 years. The latter had me thinking american wood warbler briefly. When I lived near Rye harbour reserve I had an african grey parrot come in off the sea so escapes can clearly cover large areas
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Old Monday 12th March 2018, 21:13   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by angusmcoatup View Post
Salford in the 80’s I had Diamond dove, 2 Zebra finches, a flyover falconers bird with jessies, and a parakeet sp. There were lots of aviaries in my area and I saw lots of escapes nearby (Silver Pheasant, Waxbill etc).

In London I’ve seen Alexandrine parakeet, an unidentified Parakeet and a budgie.

'Jesses', Jessies are another thing altogether where I come from!


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