Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
More discoveries. NEW: Zeiss Victory SF 32

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Passerellidae

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Monday 13th July 2015, 21:04   #26
Valéry Schollaert
Respect animals, don't eat or wear their body or skin!
 
Valéry Schollaert's Avatar

 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: I feel home in nature
Posts: 6,930
Hi guys,

Are you aware if Passerellidae would be finally recognized as a family by some authorities? AFAIK, only John Boyd use it at the moment, right?

Thanks
__________________
Do you know that 75% of pandemics in history are related to meat consumption and animal farming ? Stop the disaster, go vegan. Listen the doctor Greger carefully : https://youtu.be/Se9yqWNIG8A
Valéry Schollaert is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 13th July 2015, 21:20   #27
James Jobling
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 778
Howard & Moore Complete Checklist, 4th edition, 2014, vol. 2 Passerines, p. 337.
James Jobling is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 14th July 2015, 08:18   #28
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,562
By the way, I've been wandering through 19th C literature lately, and:

- Passerellidae Cabanis & Heine 1850-51 (Passerella Swainson 1837); OS: Passerellinae; OR: subfamily; OD: Cabanis J, Heine F. 1850-51. Museum Heineanum. I. Theil, die Singvögel enthaltend. R Frantz, Halberstadt.; [p.131].
- Arremonidae Lafresnaye 1842 (Arremon Vieillot 1816); OS: Arremoninae; OR: subfamily; OD: Lafresnaye F de, in d'Orbigny C (ed.). 1842. Dictionnaire universel d'histoire naturelle. Tome second. Paris.; [p.153].

Bock 1994 [pdf] had it right for the former, but overlooked Lafresnaye's contributions to Charles d'Orbigny's Dictionnaire, and incorrectly gave the latter as "Arremoninae Sundevall, 1872". That is:
- Arremonidae Sundevall 1872 (Arremon Vieillot 1816); OS: Arremoninae; OR: family; OD: Sundevall CJ. 1872. Methodi naturalis avium disponendarum tentamen: Försök till fogelklassens naturenliga uppställnung. Samson & Wallin, Stockholm; [p.35].
The name is there as well, but this appeared 30 years after its first occurrence. Arremonidae is senior to Passerellidae.

Last edited by l_raty : Tuesday 14th July 2015 at 11:10.
l_raty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 14th July 2015, 11:34   #29
Valéry Schollaert
Respect animals, don't eat or wear their body or skin!
 
Valéry Schollaert's Avatar

 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: I feel home in nature
Posts: 6,930
Thanks both, interesting indeed!
__________________
Do you know that 75% of pandemics in history are related to meat consumption and animal farming ? Stop the disaster, go vegan. Listen the doctor Greger carefully : https://youtu.be/Se9yqWNIG8A
Valéry Schollaert is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 14th July 2015, 13:28   #30
Nutcracker
Stop Brexit!
 
Nutcracker's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 20,216
Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
Arremonidae is senior to Passerellidae.
But fails to become the current name because it was unused for 30 years after publication so is a Nomen oblitum?
Nutcracker is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 14th July 2015, 15:47   #31
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutcracker View Post
But fails to become the current name because it was unused for 30 years after publication so is a Nomen oblitum?
No, "that" rule said 50 years, not 30, and it fell out of use in 1973. See Article 23.9 of the Code for the current flavour.

Basically:
- No name ever "is a Nomen oblitum" automatically; you need a published nomenclatural act that makes it one.
- The current rule works with a fixed reference date, not with a moving time window. (It was feared that in less-studied groups, some authors might want to "wait" the end of the time period, so that names became forgotten, and might be displaced by newly proposed names.) The fixed date is end of 1899/begin of 1900. You'd need to make sure that Arremonidae, -inae, -ini, -ina, or -whatever, was not used as valid in any publication since that date, whichever the rank. (It may be that it wasn't. The name was in use in the mid-1880's; it certainly appears in some post-1900 publications, but up to now I've only found it in descriptions of pre-1900 classifications which are not adopted by the authors, and this would not count. Unfortunately, the 20th C literature is now much less easily accessible than older works, hence it's easy to miss things; also, finding family-group name with search engines doesn't work very well in my experience, in part because OCR programs often have a hard time with final -æ's. If you want to find everything, you really ought to check everything. Note that TiF uses Arremonini right now for a tribe -- but of course TiF is not published, so this doesn't count.)
- A name can't be made a nomen oblitum unless it threatens a junior name, that must be demonstrably widely established. Here, the "widely established" threatened name would be Passerellidae: you'd need to find at least 25 published works that used this name as valid, by at least 10 different authors, published within the last 50 years (thus no early 20th C literature), and spanning at least 10 years (thus some of them would have to be from before the group started to be recognised as distinct from Old World Emberizidae in the "modern times"). You can try, but I doubt this can be done.

Last edited by l_raty : Tuesday 14th July 2015 at 17:54.
l_raty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 14th July 2015, 16:34   #32
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 2,200
The name originated in 1841 from what publication I am not sure. Louis Aggasiz 1846 says: Arremoninae Lafr. A. 1841. (Arrhemonidae) Nomenclator zoologicus: continens nomina systematica generum ..., Volume 2
__________________
Mark Brown, Esq.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 14th July 2015, 16:53   #33
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by mb1848 View Post
The name originated in 1841 from what publication I am not sure. Louis Aggasiz 1846 says: Arremoninae Lafr. A. 1841. (Arrhemonidae) Nomenclator zoologicus: continens nomina systematica generum ..., Volume 2
It's probably the same...? 1842 is the date on the title page, but the work was issued in parts and the dating of the parts is unclear. Sherborn & Palmer 1899 concluded: "We therefore urge the advisability of adhering to the dates of the completed volumes rather than to any speculative date of livraisons." See [zoonomen].
l_raty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 15th July 2015, 18:29   #34
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 2,200
Agassiz in 1846 changed the spelling of Vieillot's Arremon to Arrhemon, "Scr. Arrhemon". Scr is scriptor the writer, ie Agassiz. This spelling was used by others.
https://books.google.com/books?id=0N...gbs_navlinks_s .

Page 319. Was this a mis-latinization a misspelling or scrivnors error? Does it stick? He changed Arremoninae to Arrhemoninae also.
__________________
Mark Brown, Esq.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 15th July 2015, 20:23   #35
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,562
The original Greek word is ἀρρήμων, ον, speachless. The classical latinisation of ρρ is rrh, see the Appendix B to the 1985 Code; rr is a straight letter-to-letter transliteration, which used to be regarded as "less good" and was frequently "corrected" to the former.
Nowadays, it's the original spelling that counts: Vieillot 1816 wrote it Arremon.
By the way, for non-US readers: The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, [p.319]. (Interesting to see that the attribution there was still correct.)

Last edited by l_raty : Wednesday 15th July 2015 at 20:26.
l_raty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 15th July 2015, 20:35   #36
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 2,200
Thanks Laurent! Neal Evenhuis dates the livraison for Arremoninae as September 1841 based on multiple sources. But he states on livraisons without good data, dates given by Sherborn and Palmer should be used.
http://hbs.bishopmuseum.org/pubs-onl...f/op30p219.pdf .
__________________
Mark Brown, Esq.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 29th September 2015, 13:42   #37
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Yellow-green Bush Tanager

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Klicka, Barker, Burns, Lanyon, Lovette, Chaves & Bryson (in press). A comprehensive multilocus assessment of sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae) relationships. Mol Phylogenet Evol. [abstract]
Quote:
... Importantly, this assemblage now includes the two traditionally thraupid genera Chlorospingus and Oreothraupis (although the former is polyphyletic, with C. flavovirens remaining placed among the tanagers). ...
AOU-SACC...
Quote:
67a. Klicka et al. (2014) found that flavovirens was not a member of Chlorospingus and was actually a true tanager (Thraupidae). SACC proposal badly needed.
Forthcoming (will the authors describe a new genus?)...

Avendaño, Barker & Cadena (in review). The Yellow-green Bush-tanager is not a bush-tanager nor a sparrow: Molecular phylogenetics reveals that Chlorospingus flavovirens is a tanager (Aves: Passeriformes; Thraupidae).

Hilty 2011 (HBW 16).

Last edited by Richard Klim : Tuesday 29th September 2015 at 14:05. Reason: HBW.
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 29th September 2015, 16:20   #38
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
... (will the authors describe a new genus?)...
Hard to say without knowing where the species belongs. Or did I miss something here?
Klicka et al. 2014 [pdf] said nothing about its placement, except that it remained placed among the tanagers.
So far as I can assess, no data associated to this study seem to be available in Genbank at all. (In what seems to be the version of record of the work, you can read: "All sequences were deposited in GenBank (accession numbers XXX–XXX)."... )
l_raty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 29th September 2015, 16:53   #39
Richard Klim
-------------------------
 
Richard Klim's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Somerset, UK
Posts: 12,792
Quote:
Originally Posted by l_raty View Post
Hard to say without knowing where the species belongs. Or did I miss something here?
No, Laurent. I was just being (over-)presumptuous, given that the title doesn't mention an existing thraupid genus.
Richard Klim is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 26th May 2016, 07:54   #40
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,147
Robert W. Bryson, Jr., Brant C. Faircloth, Whitney L. E. Tsai, John E. McCormack, and John Klicka (2016) Target enrichment of thousands of ultraconserved elements sheds new light on early relationships within New World sparrows (Aves: Passerellidae). The Auk: July 2016, Vol. 133, No. 3, pp. 451-458.

[abstract]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 29th May 2016, 00:19   #41
thyoloalethe
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Posts: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Robert W. Bryson, Jr., Brant C. Faircloth, Whitney L. E. Tsai, John E. McCormack, and John Klicka (2016) Target enrichment of thousands of ultraconserved elements sheds new light on early relationships within New World sparrows (Aves: Passerellidae). The Auk: July 2016, Vol. 133, No. 3, pp. 451-458.

[abstract]
John Boyd (TiF):
http://www.jboyd.net/Taxo/changes.html (28 May 2016)
http://www.jboyd.net/Taxo/List30.html#passerellidae
thyoloalethe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 29th May 2016, 07:40   #42
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
Robert W. Bryson, Jr., Brant C. Faircloth, Whitney L. E. Tsai, John E. McCormack, and John Klicka (2016) Target enrichment of thousands of ultraconserved elements sheds new light on early relationships within New World sparrows (Aves: Passerellidae). The Auk: July 2016, Vol. 133, No. 3, pp. 451-458.
[pdf]
l_raty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 24th June 2016, 06:03   #43
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,147
Zonotrichia atricapilla

Daizaburo Shizuka, M. Ross Lein, and Glen Chilton (2016) Range-wide patterns of geographic variation in songs of Golden-crowned Sparrows (Zonotrichia atricapilla). The Auk: July 2016, Vol. 133, No. 3, pp. 520-529.

[abstract]
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Friday 7th October 2016, 19:25   #44
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,147
Junco

Guillermo Friis, Angeles de Cara, Borja Mila. Testing the role of selection and demography in driving a rapid postglacial radiation in the songbird genus Junco. Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution Conference 2016.

Abstract:

Rapid evolutionary radiations likely result from the combined effects of selective pressures and demographic processes. The songbird genus Junco of North America includes several phenotypically divergent northern forms which have arisen within the last 10,000 years as a result of a rapid postglacial expansion across North America. These northern forms contrast with more genetically divergent ancestral southern forms that are geographically isolated, yet show moderate phenotypic divergence. In addition to the role of geographic and historical factors, the wide range of habitat types and the highly diversified patterns of plumage coloration suggest the role of multiple selective factors in driving lineage divergence. Here we combine whole-genome and genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the genus and explore how genomic patterns of variation relate to demographic events and selective factors. We use MSMC (multiple sequentially Markovian coalescent) and G-Phocs (generalized phylogenetic coalescent sampler) to test the population-expansion and recent-divergence hypotheses in northern junco forms. MSMC revealed recent demographic expansions for all the northern junco forms, reinforcing the hypothesis of multiple lineage differentiation driven by a postglacial northward recolonization of North America. We also used Bayescan to calculate FSTand posterior probabilities per SNP to infer selection-mediated divergence, and found no specific regions of high differentiation but rather a number of highly divergent variants scattered across the genome. This suggests the role of selection acting on numerous loci across the genome from the early stages of the speciation process. Our analyses show that juncos represent one of the fastest radiations documented in birds, with major roles for historical, demographic and selective factors.
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th March 2017, 18:00   #45
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,147
Melozone and Aimophila

Luis Sandoval, Kevin L. Epperly, John Klicka, Daniel J. Mennill. The biogeographic and evolutionary history of an endemic clade of Middle American sparrows: Melozone and Aimophila (Aves: Passerellidae). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 7 March 2017

Abstract:

The large number of endemic species in Middle America is frequently attributed to the interplay of geographical barriers and historical climatic changes in the region. This process promotes genetic divergence between populations, and given enough time, may yield new species. Animals that inhabit mid-elevation or highland habitats may be disproportionately affected in this way. Genetic analyses of animals in this region allow us to better understand how historical patterns of isolation have influenced the generation of new species in this biodiversity hotspot. We studied the biogeography and systematics of two closely related genera of sparrows (Passerellidae): Melozone and Aimophila. Collectively, this group is distributed from the southwestern United States and southward as far as central Costa Rica. We sampled 81 individuals of 8 Melozone and 2 Aimophila species, from 19 localities distributed throughout their ranges. We reconstructed phylogenetic relationships and time-calibrated species trees using multilocus sequence data comprised of one mitochondrial gene and five nuclear genes. We conducted an ancestral area reconstruction analysis to determine the probability of ancestral range at each divergent event. Despite analyzing six loci, we were unable to obtain a fully resolved phylogenetic tree. We recovered four main lineages: lineage 1 includes four Melozone species distributed north of Isthmus of Tehuantepec (M. albicollis, M. crissalis, M. aberti, M. fusca); lineage 2 includes three Melozone species distributed south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (M. biarcuata, M. cabanisi, M. leucotis); lineage 3 lineage consists of a single species endemic to the Pacific coast of Mexico (M. kieneri); and lineage 4 includes the more widely distributed sparrows in the genus Aimophila. Our analyses suggest that these genera probably originated during the late Miocene in the Madrean Highlands of southern Mexico. We identified dispersal as the prevalent cause of speciation in this clade with most lineages dispersing to their current distributions from southern Mexico either to the north following a developing and expanding Madro-Tertiary flora, or to the south across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. A similar pattern of dispersal from this biogeographic region has been reported in other taxa including fishes, reptiles, and birds. Our results reveal that the four lineages identified represent geographically coherent and ecologically similar assemblages of taxa. Finally, when our genetic results are considered, along with apparent differences in morphology and song, the allopatric forms M. b. cabanisi and M. l. occipitalis warrant recognition as biological species.
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th March 2017, 18:34   #46
lewis20126
Registered User
 
lewis20126's Avatar

 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 9,480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Kovalik View Post
inally, when our genetic results are considered, along with apparent differences in morphology and song, the allopatric forms M. b. cabanisi and M. l. occipitalis warrant recognition as biological species.
Good to get back up from genetics, but a result that surprises nobody that has seen the taxa in the field...or even looked at pictures of them! Two species under Tobias et al., BLI checklist vol 2.

cheers, alan
lewis20126 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th March 2017, 19:49   #47
LeNomenclatoriste
Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
 
LeNomenclatoriste's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: France
Posts: 849
Tif Update March 8, 2017

American Sparrows:

I've changed the family name from Passerellidae (Cabanis and Heine 1850-51) to Arremonidae (Lafresnaye 1842) for priority reasons.

Based on Sandoval et al. (2017) and the HBW BirdLife Checklist (del Hoyo and Collar, 2016) I have split Gray-crowned Ground-Sparrow, Melozone occipitalis, from White-eared Ground-Sparrow, Melozone leucotis (inc. nigrior) and with the assistance of Sandoval (2014) split Cabanis's Ground-Sparrow, Melozone cabanisi, from Prevost's Ground-Sparrow, Melozone biarcuata (inc. hartwegi). I have also rearranged Aimophila, Kieneria, and Melozone using information from Sandoval et al. (2017).
[Arremonidae, Core Passeroidea III, 3.04]
__________________
Orite à longue queue, Plectrophane des neiges, Percnoptère d'Égypte.. it's time for French ornithology to evolve
LeNomenclatoriste is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 11th July 2017, 05:36   #48
LeNomenclatoriste
Taxonomy and zoological nomenclature
 
LeNomenclatoriste's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: France
Posts: 849
http://www.mapress.com/j/zt/article/...otaxa.4291.1.9

Phenotypic variation and vocal divergence reveals a species complex in White-eared Ground-sparrows (Cabanis) (Aves: Passerellidae)


LUIS SANDOVAL, PIERRE-PAUL BITTON, ALANA D. DEMKO, STÉPHANIE M. DOUCET, DANIEL J. MENNILL

Abstract

The taxonomy of the genus Melozone has recently been analyzed from genus to subspecies level, leading to a significant revision of our understanding of this group of birds. Previous studies quantified differences in phenotypic traits, behavior, and genotypes, to provide a better understanding of the underappreciated diversity within Melozone and the relationship between species within this genus. Yet the relationship between the subspecies of White-eared Ground-sparrows, Melozone leucotis, has not received thorough taxonomic scrutiny. In this study, we evaluate the taxonomic status of the three recognized subspecies of M. leucotis using multiple morphometric characteristics, plumage color features, and vocalizations. We measured plumage patterns and reflectance from museum specimens, morphometric features from museum specimens and live birds, and vocal characteristics from sound recordings. We observed substantial variation between subspecies in plumage, morphometry, and voice, especially between northern and southern birds. The phenotypic and vocal differences exhibited by M. l. occipitalis (from Chiapas, Mexico; Guatemala; and El Salvador) suggest that its taxonomic relationship with the M. l. leucotis and M. l. nigrior complex (from Costa Rica and Nicaragua, respectively) needs to be reevaluated, because these two groups are highly diagnosable from one another. Additionally, M. l. occipitalis is geographically isolated from the other two subspecies, reducing the probability of contact by natural causes in the near future. Based on the clear differences in voice, plumage, and morphometric features reported here, we propose that M. l. occipitalis be recognized as a distinct species, M. occipitalis (Salvin's Ground-sparrow), diagnosed on the basis of its longer tail, longer bill, duller plumage, and songs with a lower frequency of maximum amplitude.
__________________
Orite à longue queue, Plectrophane des neiges, Percnoptère d'Égypte.. it's time for French ornithology to evolve
LeNomenclatoriste is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 3rd August 2019, 08:39   #49
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,147
Baird's Junco

TiF Update August 2:

Baird's Junco, Junco bairdi has been split from the Yellow-eyed Junco, Junco phaeonotus as per the AOS 58th Supplement. The phylogeny follows Friis et al., 2016), where Baird's Junco is not even sister to the Yellow-eyed Junco.
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 13th January 2020, 08:08   #50
Peter Kovalik
Registered User
 
Peter Kovalik's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sp. Hrhov
Posts: 3,147
Arremon taciturnus

Carina Carneiro De Melo Moura, Alexandre M. Fernandes, Alexandre Aleixo, Helder Farias Pereira De Araújo, Erich De Freitas Mariano & Michael Wink. Evolutionary history of the Pectoral Sparrow Arremon taciturnus: Evidence for diversification during the Late Pleistocene. Ibis, First published: 08 January 2020 https://doi.org/10.1111/ibi.12813

Abstract:

We focus on reconstructing a spatiotemporal scenario of diversification of the widespread South American species, the Pectoral Sparrow (Aves: Passerellidae). This species is widely distributed in both the humid and dry forests of South America and therefore provides an interesting model for understanding the connection between different biomes of South America. We examined nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genes Cytochrome b (cyt‐b) and NADH subunit 2 (ND2) from 107 specimens, and one nuclear marker (intron 7 of the β‐fibrinogen gene) from a subset of samples collected across the distribution ranges of A. t. taciturnus and A. t. nigrirostris. Six major lineages were recovered in the phylogenies that displayed high levels of variance of allele frequencies and corresponded to distinct geographic locations. The estimation of divergence times provided evidence that diversification of the six lineages of the pectoral sparrow occurred throughout the Late Pleistocene across major Cis‐Andean biomes and Amazonian interfluves. Our dataset for A. taciturnus provides further evidence that rivers in Amazonia constitute barriers promoting allopatric speciation, with occasional sharing of alleles among lineages, particularly those with adjacent distributions.
Peter Kovalik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.29346299 seconds with 38 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 10:47.