Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
More discoveries. NEW: Zeiss Victory SF 32

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

Your most anticipated futures books

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 4.00 average.
Old Saturday 4th April 2020, 14:42   #401
John Cantelo
Registered User
 
John Cantelo's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Canterbury, UK
Posts: 6,386
The "Flight Identification of European Passerines and Select Landbirds" by Tomasz Cofta & Michał Skakuj
(Nov 2020 456 pages, 2000 colour photos, 1850 colour illustrations Publisher: WILDGuides) looks interesting as it promises detailed coverage of 206 passerines and 32 near-passerine landbirds. Perhaps the most interesting thing about the book is that it's illustrated using digital imagery examples of which, perhaps including some artwork from this book, can be seen at https://www.coroflot.com/TCofta/portfolio.
__________________
John

Please support Andalucia Bird Society www.andalusiabirdsociety.org Visit my website & blog on birding in SW Spain at http://birdingcadizprovince.weebly.com/

Last edited by John Cantelo : Saturday 4th April 2020 at 19:35.
John Cantelo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Saturday 4th April 2020, 17:56   #402
Jim Martin
Friend of the auk
 
Jim Martin's Avatar

 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: London
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swissboy View Post
Any chance that this would mean a publishing date by the end of October 2020 is realistic?
Publishing 26 November.

Jim
__________________
Jim Martin
Bloomsbury Publishing
[email protected] / @chiffchat
Jim Martin is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 5th April 2020, 18:55   #403
jurek
Registered User
 
jurek's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Switzerland/Poland
Posts: 4,238
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Cantelo View Post
The "Flight Identification of European Passerines and Select Landbirds" by Tomasz Cofta & Michał Skakuj
Looking forward, it could become one of my most valuable references.

I met Tomasz over 20 years ago on a migration ringing camp on the Baltic. He was then watching tens of thousands of migrating birds and working on the book. It was a revelation to me when he pointed that one can easily tell a flying finch from a tit only by shape of the trail it makes in the air. And tell most species of European finches by shape and flight only, without the call or the colors.

And concerning quality of his art: i still remember how his illustration of an Ivory-billed Woodpecker caused an argument on BirdForum that somebody photographed the live bird!

Last edited by jurek : Sunday 5th April 2020 at 18:59.
jurek is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 5th April 2020, 19:08   #404
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 17,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by jurek View Post
Looking forward, it could become one of my most valuable references.

I met Tomasz over 20 years ago on a migration ringing camp on the Baltic. He was then watching tens of thousands of migrating birds and working on the book. It was a revelation to me when he pointed that one can easily tell a flying finch from a tit only by shape of the trail it makes in the air. And tell most species of European finches by shape and flight only, without the call or the colors.

And concerning quality of his art: i still remember how his illustration of an Ivory-billed Woodpecker caused an argument on BirdForum that somebody photographed the live bird!
Are you sure he wasn't talking about planes......!

Something lost in translation maybe because I have never seen a bird leave a trail in the air?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Sunday 5th April 2020, 20:47   #405
jurek
Registered User
 
jurek's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Switzerland/Poland
Posts: 4,238
Whatever, an imaginary line the bird makes in the air, a flight path.
jurek is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 6th April 2020, 17:29   #406
Stonefaction
Yes!
 
Stonefaction's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Dundee
Posts: 1,774
"Flight Identification of European Passerines and Select Landbirds" sounds like a good one. Flight ID is largely absent from a lot of field guides, with flight style and flight views often ignored - especially rear views of almost everything and underside views of passerines. The exceptions would be a couple of seawatching books and the raptors in flight books.

I do have a Birds of Britain and Europe guide by Rob Hume that has small diagrams indicating the flight track/style and a brief written description of flight style but the flight view illustrations are mostly top-side, when underside views are arguably more useful. The "What's That Bird?" book by Michael Hayman & Peter Everett has views from behind of birds in flight though it would benefit from better illustrations (and a more compact size).

Given the available technology these days it must be theoretically possible (though a LOT of work) to make an app/website with 3D 'models' of each species where you could rotate and view the bird from any angle, perched, and 'in flight' (preferably with accurately pose-able wings - and for perched, moveable head, spreadable tail etc). CGI for TV and film can already do that. The above can't be too many years away from reality. Until then, I'll buy the book.

Jurek, "trail it makes in the air" made perfect sense to me. Incidentally I've got photos of quite a few 'trails' left by birds in the air - though they did disappear a bit quicker than most aircraft vapour trails, but they did show where the bird was a second or two before and direction of travel could be ascertained....
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	16698921668_f146c74bc5_c.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	48.6 KB
ID:	723273  
Stonefaction is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 6th April 2020, 17:59   #407
John Cantelo
Registered User
 
John Cantelo's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Canterbury, UK
Posts: 6,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stonefaction View Post
The "What's That Bird?" book by Michael Hayman & Peter Everett has views from behind of birds in flight though it would benefit from better illustrations (and a more compact size).
Better illustrations? Hayman's artwork is as good as it gets and in some ways better than that in the Collins Guide. "The Mitchell Beazley Birdwatcher's Pocket Guide to Britain and Europe" has many of the same (or very similar) illustrations and is one of the most pocketable field guides. A great shame it was flawed by having no maps, poor descriptions of call and, I think, no lengths (my copy's in Spain).
__________________
John

Please support Andalucia Bird Society www.andalusiabirdsociety.org Visit my website & blog on birding in SW Spain at http://birdingcadizprovince.weebly.com/
John Cantelo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 6th April 2020, 18:16   #408
Stonefaction
Yes!
 
Stonefaction's Avatar

 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Dundee
Posts: 1,774
Having had a quick double-check of the "What's That Bird?" book, John, I think there's a number of illustrations that don't come close to meeting your description. Winter Grebes, Warblers etc. For what it is, it is a very handy book but let down, in my opinion, by some of the illustrations. I do agree with regards the other book - and what it does manage to squeeze into a small, very useable size. An actual pocket guide.
Stonefaction is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 6th April 2020, 18:45   #409
DMW
Registered User
 
DMW's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Jersey
Posts: 2,011
Quote:
Originally Posted by jurek View Post
Whatever, an imaginary line the bird makes in the air, a flight path.
This is a long-exposure shot taken from the bridge of a ship at night in the Weddell Sea in Antarctica. The crazy white lines illuminated by the beams of light are the flight path of a Snow Petrel.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	sp.JPG
Views:	80
Size:	65.3 KB
ID:	723278  
DMW is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 6th April 2020, 21:31   #410
Swissboy
Registered User
BF Supporter 2020
 
Swissboy's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Sempach, Switzerland
Posts: 3,784
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMW View Post
This is a long-exposure shot taken from the bridge of a ship at night in the Weddell Sea in Antarctica. The crazy white lines illuminated by the beams of light are the flight path of a Snow Petrel.
Very interesting shot. Something one usually does not get to see. Thanks so much for sharing.
__________________
Robert
--PS: That's a Sooty Falcon on the avatar, photo taken near Sharm el Sheik, Egypt. My highest priority raptor at the time.
What's your species on the avatar? I often have no clue
!
Swissboy is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Monday 6th April 2020, 22:35   #411
RafaelMatias
Registered User
 
RafaelMatias's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Posts: 3,250
Snow Petrels are among the most incredible bird species! Fantastic. It reminded me of this: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/m...tion-starling/
RafaelMatias is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 6th April 2020, 22:51   #412
RafaelMatias
Registered User
 
RafaelMatias's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Posts: 3,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by RafaelMatias View Post
Snow Petrels are among the most incredible bird species! Fantastic. It reminded me of this: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/m...tion-starling/
And of this Common Swift illustration I made a few years ago for the Portuguese breeding birds Atlas:
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Atlas_113_Apus_2.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	208.0 KB
ID:	723290  
RafaelMatias is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th April 2020, 09:35   #413
foresttwitcher
Registered User

 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: The Chilterns
Posts: 1,944
Fascinating link and great artwork, Rafael, thank you for posting.
__________________
Pete.

Can't see the birds for the trees!
foresttwitcher is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th April 2020, 11:34   #414
DMW
Registered User
 
DMW's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Jersey
Posts: 2,011
Quote:
Originally Posted by RafaelMatias View Post
And of this Common Swift illustration I made a few years ago for the Portuguese breeding birds Atlas:
Superb! You're obviously a very talented artist!

The fulmar photo is amazing.
DMW is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th April 2020, 19:26   #415
RafaelMatias
Registered User
 
RafaelMatias's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Posts: 3,250
Thanks both for your kind words
RafaelMatias is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th April 2020, 20:34   #416
Swissboy
Registered User
BF Supporter 2020
 
Swissboy's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Sempach, Switzerland
Posts: 3,784
Quote:
Originally Posted by RafaelMatias View Post
And of this Common Swift illustration I made a few years ago for the Portuguese breeding birds Atlas:
I actually love your illustration much more than the more mechanical looking ones you presented first. Though the fulmar picture with the waterfalls is great as well.
__________________
Robert
--PS: That's a Sooty Falcon on the avatar, photo taken near Sharm el Sheik, Egypt. My highest priority raptor at the time.
What's your species on the avatar? I often have no clue
!
Swissboy is offline  
Reply With Quote

BF Supporter 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Support BirdForum With A Donation

Old Tuesday 7th April 2020, 21:47   #417
Aidan G. Kelly
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Balbriggan, Dublin
Posts: 30
New seabirds identification guide by Peter Harrison

I see from the link below that Peter Harrison hopes to complete a new comprehensive guide to the World's Seabirds by the end of the year.
Something he's been working on for years.
Looks like it should be an amazing and monumental piece of work.


https://www.apex-expeditions.com/blo...ication-guide/
Aidan G. Kelly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 7th April 2020, 22:17   #418
RafaelMatias
Registered User
 
RafaelMatias's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Posts: 3,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aidan G. Kelly View Post
I see from the link below that Peter Harrison hopes to complete a new comprehensive guide to the World's Seabirds by the end of the year.
Something he's been working on for years.
Looks like it should be an amazing and monumental piece of work.


https://www.apex-expeditions.com/blo...ication-guide/
Bookmarked that page and definitely on my wish list!
RafaelMatias is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th April 2020, 03:07   #419
pbjosh
Registered User

 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Buenos Aires
Posts: 1,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aidan G. Kelly View Post
I see from the link below that Peter Harrison hopes to complete a new comprehensive guide to the World's Seabirds by the end of the year.
Something he's been working on for years.
Looks like it should be an amazing and monumental piece of work.


https://www.apex-expeditions.com/blo...ication-guide/
Excellent news - I knew that it was in progress and I had heard that it was "nearing completion" but this will be fantastic. The combination of Howell & Zufelt's photo-ID guide with a completely new, modern Harrison guide will really mark a new era in seabirding!
pbjosh is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th April 2020, 07:37   #420
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 17,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aidan G. Kelly View Post
I see from the link below that Peter Harrison hopes to complete a new comprehensive guide to the World's Seabirds by the end of the year.
Something he's been working on for years.
Looks like it should be an amazing and monumental piece of work.


https://www.apex-expeditions.com/blo...ication-guide/
Hi Aidan,
hope you're well.

I don't know if you saw the link about the proposed pelagic to Marion Island....

https://www.birdforum.net/showthread...=marion+island

I was at one point considering going and in reading up, it was stated somewhere that Peter Harrison would be on board, signing his books.
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 8th April 2020, 08:35   #421
John Cantelo
Registered User
 
John Cantelo's Avatar

 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Canterbury, UK
Posts: 6,386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aidan G. Kelly View Post
I see from the link below that Peter Harrison hopes to complete a new comprehensive guide to the World's Seabirds by the end of the year.
Something he's been working on for years.
Looks like it should be an amazing and monumental piece of work.


https://www.apex-expeditions.com/blo...ication-guide/
Thanks for this - it will certainly be a 'must-have' guide. In an interview with Peter Harrison published some years ago (wherein it was suggested the book would be published in 2015!) he says that the book will be in two volumes; an ID guide (which seems to be what he's talking about in the link given) and a second volume on seabird biology, etc. Is this still the plan? I'd also add that Hans Larson is also involved with the work which bodes well as he illustrated Klaus Malling Olsen's three books on gulls, Terns & skuas.
__________________
John

Please support Andalucia Bird Society www.andalusiabirdsociety.org Visit my website & blog on birding in SW Spain at http://birdingcadizprovince.weebly.com/
John Cantelo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th April 2020, 12:09   #422
Aidan G. Kelly
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Balbriggan, Dublin
Posts: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by andyadcock View Post
Hi Aidan,
hope you're well.

I don't know if you saw the link about the proposed pelagic to Marion Island....

https://www.birdforum.net/showthread...=marion+island

I was at one point considering going and in reading up, it was stated somewhere that Peter Harrison would be on board, signing his books.
Hi Andy,
Keeping well considering the lock-down situation. Hope you're the same.
I had heard something about this trip, but hadn't seen this BF link. Unfortunately work-wise late January doesn't suit me for a trip.

Haven't heard anything on possibility off P. Harrison 's new seabirds book being published in 2 volumes John.
The addition of Hans Larsson's artwork will certainly make it very appealing I'd imagine...
Aidan G. Kelly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th April 2020, 13:38   #423
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,737
The new Peterson guide arrived in the mail today!

Like many birders, I like to collect field guides and related books, even if they are more likely to sit on my shelf than ride around in the car with me. Sibley and Nat Geo are still my first choices, the former because it's the single best book for bird id, the latter because of its completeness and the regular updates.

I mostly purchased this book due to the inclusion of Hawaii. However I admit it is very awkwardly included, as there is a completely separate section of the book at the end where all the Hawaiian birds are included. And I mean ALL of the birds...they reprint text and pictures of migrant ducks, shorebirds, birds introduced from North America, etc. Kind of feels like a middle approach that doesn't help anyone: It adds extra pages to the book making it more awkward to carry around, while at the same time feeling like the content would have been better off just as a separate book. Don't get me wrong...I am happy to see the inclusion, just feels awkward. I would prefer them to just integrate that content in the appropriate places in the book: If I can deal with scrolling past Emperor Goose while birding Florida, I can do the same with Hawaiian goose.

The coverage of Hawaiian birds IS good however: It seems fairly up to date, and most importantly extinct birds are removed to there own separate section, rather than mixed in with similarly looking living birds. And it's nice to have a book that doesn't lump them with all the other South Pacific birds.

I've only skimmed the rest of the book...range maps seem to be up to date and taxonomy is current (for instance, Yellow-breasted Chat is in its own family, etc). I like that some of the plates lump everything together, for instance there is a plate of confusing fall warblers, and I like the way they present the empidonax flycatchers. However the amount of geographic variation illustrated is limited, and some confusing groups really need more pictures. For instance, gulls are shown in flight, with closes up of head and feet. It's weird that there are no resting/standing gulls...certainly I spend far more time scanning through resting gull flocks than I do trying to sort through a bunch of flying birds. I would guess a lot of these plates were from the earlier editions. The artwork itself isn't bad, although I do prefer the art in other guides.
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABAonnecticut Warbler
Mammal: 230 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th April 2020, 14:16   #424
andyadcock
Registered User
 
andyadcock's Avatar

 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK and Occasionally St Petersburg, Russia
Posts: 17,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticete View Post
The new Peterson guide arrived in the mail today!

Like many birders, I like to collect field guides and related books, even if they are more likely to sit on my shelf than ride around in the car with me. Sibley and Nat Geo are still my first choices, the former because it's the single best book for bird id, the latter because of its completeness and the regular updates.

I mostly purchased this book due to the inclusion of Hawaii. However I admit it is very awkwardly included, as there is a completely separate section of the book at the end where all the Hawaiian birds are included. And I mean ALL of the birds...they reprint text and pictures of migrant ducks, shorebirds, birds introduced from North America, etc. Kind of feels like a middle approach that doesn't help anyone: It adds extra pages to the book making it more awkward to carry around, while at the same time feeling like the content would have been better off just as a separate book. Don't get me wrong...I am happy to see the inclusion, just feels awkward. I would prefer them to just integrate that content in the appropriate places in the book: If I can deal with scrolling past Emperor Goose while birding Florida, I can do the same with Hawaiian goose.

The coverage of Hawaiian birds IS good however: It seems fairly up to date, and most importantly extinct birds are removed to there own separate section, rather than mixed in with similarly looking living birds. And it's nice to have a book that doesn't lump them with all the other South Pacific birds.

I've only skimmed the rest of the book...range maps seem to be up to date and taxonomy is current (for instance, Yellow-breasted Chat is in its own family, etc). I like that some of the plates lump everything together, for instance there is a plate of confusing fall warblers, and I like the way they present the empidonax flycatchers. However the amount of geographic variation illustrated is limited, and some confusing groups really need more pictures. For instance, gulls are shown in flight, with closes up of head and feet. It's weird that there are no resting/standing gulls...certainly I spend far more time scanning through resting gull flocks than I do trying to sort through a bunch of flying birds. I would guess a lot of these plates were from the earlier editions. The artwork itself isn't bad, although I do prefer the art in other guides.
The book must be unique in including birds that are 'known' to be extinct, makes me wonder what the point is?

There are guides that depict species where there is hope of rediscovery e.g White-eyed River martin and Pink-headed Duck but the inclusion of extinct birds seems a waste of space to me, you could have had a plate for your perched Gulls?
__________________
Andy A
andyadcock is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Thursday 9th April 2020, 18:57   #425
Mysticete
Registered User
 
Mysticete's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,737
National Geographic has for many many editions included extinct birds in the back, put in with the ultra-rare vagrants.

Does Europe even have any (recent) confirmed extinct birds? I know the Mediterranean region suffered a wave of bird extinction, but thousands of years ago.
__________________
World: 1195, ABA: 628
Last Lifer: Connecticut Warbler
Last ABAonnecticut Warbler
Mammal: 230 Herp: 174
Mysticete is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Here's My Review of the Much Anticipated and Continually Delayed HT Troubador Zeiss 35 Wednesday 29th August 2012 07:09
Log Books/Note Books mattwhite Tips For New Birders 22 Tuesday 19th April 2011 08:54
A longer walk than I anticipated! Fozzybear Birds & Birding 14 Tuesday 9th March 2010 14:38
I-Spy books tarves57 Birds & Birding 4 Sunday 13th April 2003 09:22

{googleads}

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.25627494 seconds with 40 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 02:28.