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Dutch Birding bird names 2011

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Old Friday 21st January 2011, 08:22   #1
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Dutch Birding bird names 2011

van den Berg 2011. Dutch Birding-vogelnamen / Dutch Birding bird names. Jan 2011.
http://www.dutchbirding.nl/content/p...ud20110120.pdf

[A preview of the annual taxa names update which will presumably be published in Dutch Birding 33(1).]

Taxonomic changes (wrt the preceding version, Jul 2010) include:
  • Larus barabensis Steppe Gull is recognised as specifically distinct from L heuglini.

  • Sterna acuflavida Cabot's Tern is recognised as specifically distinct from S sandvicensis [Efe et al 2009, IOC].

  • Riparia diluta Pale Martin is recognised as specifically distinct from R riparia [IOC, H&M3, Clements, HBW, OBC, CBR].

  • Turdoides is reassigned to new family Leiothrichidae [IOC].

  • Troglodytes troglodytes is renamed Eurasian Wren in recognition of the split of T hiemalis/pacificus [AOU, IOC, Clements, CBR].

  • Sturnus vulgaris granti Azores Starling is highlighted as 'a distinct subspecies sometimes considered specifically distinct'.

  • Vermivora pinus is corrected to V cyanoptera [AOU, IOC, Clements, HBW].

  • Generic reassignments within Parulini:

    • Vermivora peregrina to Oreothlypis [AOU, IOC, Clements].
    • Seiurus noveboracensis, motacilla to Parkesia [AOU, IOC, Clements].
    • Parula americana to Setophaga.
    • Dendroica to Setophaga.
    • Wilsonia citrina to Setophaga.
    • Wilsonia pusilla, canadensis to Cardellina.
A few other changes concern vernacular names or additions to the WP list.

Richard

Last edited by Richard Klim : Friday 21st January 2011 at 17:11.
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Old Friday 21st January 2011, 09:59   #2
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Quote:
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van den Berg 2011. Dutch Birding-vogelnamen / Dutch Birding bird names. Jan 2011.

Richard
Richard,
I note they include Reuzenalk Pinguinus impennis Great Auk. Do they know something we don't?
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Old Friday 21st January 2011, 10:30   #3
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Extinct taxa

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I note they include Reuzenalk Pinguinus impennis Great Auk. Do they know something we don't?
Seven taxa which have become globally extinct since 1840 are listed - including, perhaps controversially, Slender-billed Curlew (which sadly is probably a reasonable assessment).

Richard

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Old Sunday 27th February 2011, 21:22   #4
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Reference

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[A preview of the annual taxa names update which will presumably be published in Dutch Birding 33(1).]
Ref. Redactie Dutch Birding 2011. Redactiemededelingen: Naamgeving van taxa in Dutch Birding / Taxa names in Dutch Birding. Dutch Birding 33(1): 47-50.

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Old Monday 28th February 2011, 04:04   #5
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So presumably Azores Starling will be a new species in the 2012 or 2013 update :P
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Old Wednesday 2nd March 2011, 23:32   #6
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Edouard P Ménétries/Ménétriés 1802-1861

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Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Ref. Redactie Dutch Birding 2011. Redactiemededelingen: Naamgeving van taxa in Dutch Birding / Taxa names in Dutch Birding. Dutch Birding 33(1): 47-50.
Also of possible esoteric interest, Ménétries' Zwartkop/Ménétries's Warbler is revised to Ménétriés' Zwartkop/Ménétriés's Warbler (following Raposo & Kirwan 2008, Redman et al 2009) - see www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=147427 [posts #8-16].

Richard

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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 04:23   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Also of possible esoteric interest, Ménétries' Zwartkop/Ménétries's Warbler is revised to Ménétriés' Zwartkop/Ménétriés's Warbler - see www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=147427 [posts #8-16].
Truly impressive. Probably the finest & most carefully positioned collection of diacriticals & apostrophes I’ve ever seen in a bird name.

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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 10:08   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Klim View Post
Also of possible esoteric interest, Ménétries' Zwartkop/Ménétries's Warbler is revised to Ménétriés' Zwartkop/Ménétriés's Warbler (following Raposo & Kirwan 2008, Redman et al 2009) - see www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=147427 [posts #8-16].

Richard
Not exactly esoteric. Revision previously in:

MÉNÉTRIÉS, E. 1838. Catalogue d’insectes recueillis entre Constantinople et le Balkan. St. Pétersbourg, Acad. des Sciences. 4to. pp. 52, with 2 handcoloured lithographed plates. Contemporary half cloth.- Concerns almost entirely coleoptera.

Jobling, JA. 2010. The Helm Dictionary of Scientific names, from aalge to zusii. Christopher Helm,. London, UK.

Parkin, DT and AG Knox. 2010. The Status of Birds in Britain and Ireland. Helm, A&C Black. London, UK.

'Nuff said?
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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 11:25   #9
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I'm not exactly convinced that Ménétriés "revised" his own name; presumably he knew how (he preferred) to spell it. In modern ornithological literature, perhaps the credit for spelling his name thus belongs to Dickinson (2003), who (it transpires) spelt it with three é's because that is the international library standard spelling, which rationale was that employed by Raposo & Kirwan, whither:

"(Given that several alternative spellings exist in the ornithological literature for Ménétriés, namely the present spelling, as well as Ménétries and even Ménétriès, and that we have already been ‘accused’ once, by Bornschein et al. 2007, of misspelling his name, we take the opportunity to record that the international library standard spelling is Ménétriés, as followed here and our earlier publication, Raposo et al. 2006.)."

I rather suspect that Jobling, and Knox & Parkin, followed Dickinson (2003).
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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 14:41   #10
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Originally Posted by GMK View Post
I'm not exactly convinced that Ménétriés "revised" his own name; presumably he knew how (he preferred) to spell it. In modern ornithological literature, perhaps the credit for spelling his name thus belongs to Dickinson (2003), who (it transpires) spelt it with three é's because that is the international library standard spelling, which rationale was that employed by Raposo & Kirwan, whither:

"(Given that several alternative spellings exist in the ornithological literature for Ménétriés, namely the present spelling, as well as Ménétries and even Ménétriès, and that we have already been ‘accused’ once, by Bornschein et al. 2007, of misspelling his name, we take the opportunity to record that the international library standard spelling is Ménétriés, as followed here and our earlier publication, Raposo et al. 2006.)."

I rather suspect that Jobling, and Knox & Parkin, followed Dickinson (2003).
Guy,
Notwithstanding your, as usual, erudite and well-argued case, the first editions of books he edited and produced in Russia (he was also responsible for the design at all stages) have his name spelt with 3 acute accents, including where that appears on the cover. Granted, he might have thought to do so looked more 'artistic', but the court language was French, not Russian, so I don't see that it was a misprint! I chatted with James Jobling at the BBF on this very subject, and he was aware of these books and the way the name was spelt. Perhaps the reasons are lost in the mists of time!
MJB
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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 16:04   #11
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Mike, nothing incorrect about your statement. But that misses my point. EPM knew exactly how to spell his own name. The question, interesting or not as it may be (but certainly esoteric for most people I strongly suspect), is when and how other spellings of his name came to be introduced into the (ornithological) literature and who might be given credit for returning to the "correct" spelling. In that sense, EPM did not "revise" his own name, which was the word you employed in your morning post. Certainly, most of my adult life I've managed to misspell it, following others who I presumed knew better.
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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 17:54   #12
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I think treating Baraba and Heuglin's Gull as species is taking it all a bit far...
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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 19:12   #13
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I blame Henry Dresser. In 1898 Heatly Noble in his “A List of European Birds” spelled the common name of Sylvia mystacea as Ménétries' Warbler. That is two accents and only an apostrophe at the end. But in the introduction he thanked Henry Dresser for letting him use his European bird list. Then in 1902 Dresser in his A manual of palaearctic birds, used Ménétriés's that is three accents and then apostrophe and an ‘s’ at the end.
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Old Thursday 3rd March 2011, 21:21   #14
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Steppe Gull

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I think treating Baraba and Heuglin's Gull as species is taking it all a bit far...
Although Larus barabensis is added to the Jan 2011 list, it's not mentioned/justified in DB 33(1).

Richard

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Old Friday 4th March 2011, 08:58   #15
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Mike, nothing incorrect about your statement. But that misses my point. EPM knew exactly how to spell his own name. The question, interesting or not as it may be (but certainly esoteric for most people I strongly suspect), is when and how other spellings of his name came to be introduced into the (ornithological) literature and who might be given credit for returning to the "correct" spelling. In that sense, EPM did not "revise" his own name, which was the word you employed in your morning post. Certainly, most of my adult life I've managed to misspell it, following others who I presumed knew better.
Guy,
As usual, game, set and match to you! You are quite right.
MJB
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Old Tuesday 16th August 2011, 07:16   #16
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August 2011 update

van den Berg 2011. Dutch Birding-vogelnamen / Dutch Birding bird names. 13 Aug 2011. [pdf]

Mostly scientific name spelling corrections, IOC English name changes, and WP list additions.

But one notable taxonomic revision is the lumping(!) of Motacilla iberiae Spanish Wagtail (split by Sangster et al 1999) with M cinereocapilla Ashy-headed Wagtail as 'White-throated Wagtail'. This aligns with the possible PSC arrangement suggested by Alström et al 2003 (Pipits & Wagtails, p34), although that work mistakenly gives priority to iberiae.

PS. It would be interesting to know whether CSNA still supports the recognition of M simillima Kamchatka Wagtail (also split by Sangster et al 1999). ['Simillima' is synonymised with tschutschensis by Alström et al 2003].

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Old Tuesday 16th August 2011, 11:57   #17
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Curiously they still recognize Cape Verde Kite, known to be nested within Red Kites.
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Old Tuesday 16th August 2011, 14:37   #18
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Cape Verde Kite

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Curiously they still recognize Cape Verde Kite, known to be nested within Red Kites.
See also: www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=161806 [posts 26-31].
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Old Thursday 18th August 2011, 04:05   #19
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van den Berg 2011. Dutch Birding-vogelnamen / Dutch Birding bird names. 13 Aug 2011. [pdf]

Mostly scientific name spelling corrections, IOC English name changes, and WP list additions.

But one notable taxonomic revision is the lumping(!) of Motacilla iberiae Spanish Wagtail (split by Sangster et al 1999) with M cinereocapilla Ashy-headed Wagtail as 'White-throated Wagtail'. This aligns with the possible PSC arrangement suggested by Alström et al 2003 (Pipits & Wagtails, p34), although that work mistakenly gives priority to iberiae.
Isn’t this lumping was expected also following the discovery of an Ashy-headed Wagtail population breeding in south-western Morocco, and the probable hybridisation with Spanish Wagtail?

Quote from van den Berg (2011):
Quote:
"If it turns out that the amount of hybridization (‘intergradation’) along the Atlantic coast is similar to that in south-eastern France, one may argue that diagnostic plumage differences in any age or sex are lacking."
van den Berg A.B. 2011. Breeding status of Ashy-headed Wagtail in south-western Morocco. Dutch Birding 33 (2): 117-121.
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Old Thursday 18th August 2011, 06:28   #20
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White-throated Wagtail

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Isn’t this lumping was expected also following the discovery of an Ashy-headed Wagtail population breeding in south-western Morocco, and the probable hybridisation with Spanish Wagtail?
Thanks, Mohamed. I'd forgotten about that article!

PS. I see that you've been busy writing some interesting articles recently.
  • Amezian et al 2011. Cricket Longtail breeding in southern Morocco. Dutch Birding 33(4): 229-233. [Dutch summary]
  • Qninba et al 2011. Nidifications automnales d'oiseaux sahariens dans la région d'Oued Ad-Dahab - Lagouira (Maroc méridional). Go-South Bull 8:21-34. [pdf]
Must visit Morocco again before too long...

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Old Monday 22nd August 2011, 22:49   #21
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Must visit Morocco again before too long...
Richard, you are most welcome.
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Old Friday 9th September 2011, 21:31   #22
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Muscicapinae

Given that the Netherlands so often takes the lead on WP taxonomy, I'm surprised at Dutch Birding's apparent reluctance to adopt the arrangement proposed by Sangster et al 2010 (despite George Sangster's membership of CSNA), in contrast to BOURC-TSC's latest recommendations (Sangster et al 2011, BOURC TSC 7th report).

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