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2014 Nikon Warranty Changes- USA

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Old Wednesday 15th October 2014, 20:22   #1
BruceH
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2014 Nikon Warranty Changes- USA

In early 2014 Nikon USA made changes to their warranties on the purchase of new Nikon binoculars. This was brought up in the Nikon Resale thread where it was suggested the topic deserved its own thread.

Nikon Resale thread: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=292470

Prior to 2014:

Binoculars refurbished by Nikon came with a 90 limited warranty that covers defects in workmanship and materials. It applies only to the original purchaser and can not be transferred. It does not cover misuse. According to comments made on this Forum by a Nikon rep (Mike F.), there is no more coverage on refurbs after the 90 day period. As far as I know, the 2014 changes only impact new binoculars, not refurbs. The above coverage for refurbs appears to still be the same.

New Binocular purchases: Prior to the change, Nikon had two forms of coverage. One was a 25 Year Limited Warranty. It covered defects in workmanship and materials. It applied only to the original purchaser and could not be transferred. It did not cover misuse. Additionally, Nikon had a No Fault Repair/Replacement Policy with implied lifetime coverage. Basically it covered everything not covered by the 25 Year Limited Warranty for the cost of $10 per incident. It was transferable to subsequent owners.

The following links are examples of the two documents:

Prior 25 Year Limited Life Warrany:
http://www.birdforum.net/attachment....6&d=1334946180

Prior No Fault Repair/Replacement Policy:
http://www.birdforum.net/attachment....7&d=1334946190

2014 New Binocular Changes

Sometime in early 2014 Nikon made changes. First, The 25 Year Limited Warranty was replaced with the Limited Lifetime Warranty. It appears to be the basically the same coverage, just the time period has changed and it is somewhat more specific on documenting proof of purchase. It covers defects in workmanship and materials but not misuse. It applies only to the original owner and can not be transferred to a subsequent owner.

The other big change is the Nikon No Fault Repair/Replacement Policy has been discontinued. That means there is no longer coverage for accidental damage or coverage for subsequent owners. The only coverage is what is now documented in the new Limited Lifetime Warranty.

Here is an example of the new Limited Lifetime Warranty:
http://www.birdforum.net/attachment....8&d=1412952362

Impact on New Binocular Purchases Prior to the Change

As documented in the Nikon Resale thread, a Nikon customer service rep stated that all optics are now covered only by the new Limted Lifetime Warranty.

Per the Nikon rep:
The new Limited Lifetime warranty policy would apply to all of your sport optics products. Basically, as long as your products don't sustain any damage to misuse (impact), sand, or liquid damage (if they are non-waterproof), your products would be covered under the lifetime warranty.


Summary

Binoculars purchased new either pre or post change are only covered by the Limted Lifetime Warranty. That means there is now lifetime coverage for defects without charge but there is no longer coverage for accidental damage and there is no longer any coverage for a used Nikon.
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Old Wednesday 15th October 2014, 21:01   #2
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Well, I was mighty annoyed a year ago to find out that their no-fault policy didn't apply to refurbs. Given the most recent change, this customer will no longer even consider their products. First, I'm not going to be around for 25 yrs. Second, anything I give my children/grandchildren will not be covered by a warranty.

I'm sticking with Swarovski and Zeiss for high priced stuff.

Thanks for starting this thread, Bruce.
Ed
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Old Wednesday 15th October 2014, 22:28   #3
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Ed .. You're welcome. I understand what you are saying. I also am not thrilled with this change.

I own what to me is a substantial number of Nikon products purchased under the old warranty and policy. Nikon discontinuing the No Fault Policy instantly diminished the value of the Nikons that I own. Where as before a potential used buyer knew that if the binocular (such as an EDG) developed a problem they were assured by the Policy that it would be taken care of for a mere $10. Now the risk is much greater, which will most likely make it harder to sell a Nikon and it will reduce the price of a used Nikon. The end result is it reduces my value.

One member mentioned in the Resale thread that a Policy (vs a Warranty) can be changed at will by the company. On the other hand, is a policy a form of contract, such as a life insurance policy? Just because the insurance company calls it a policy, they can not arbitrarily change the terms. There is nothing in the now discontinued No Fault Policy saying it can be discontinued at any time. I am not a lawyer so I do not know how this would play out if challenged by someone who purchased a binocular before the changes. There may be an argument to be made that Nikon is obligated to honor the Policy as a contract for pre change buyers. I am not doubting that Nikon can discontinue the policy for future sales, but I am wondering if they have grounds to enforce the cancellation retroactively.

Getting back more to Ed's point, I wonder if this was a good competitive move. Maybe Nikon is thinking they will be starting a new trend in the industry to discontinue no fault transferable warranties. As demonstrated by the hundreds of posts on this forum all of the high end binoculars are excellent. It is the small things that come into play when deciding which to buy. There are posts where someone made their decision based on the customer service (which includes warranty). This is especially true with Swarovski purchases. It appears the Nikon EDG already trails Zeiss and Swarovski significantly in the high end market. Things are actually getting more competitive for Nikon in this area with the Zeiss SF and Leica Plus updates. It seems like a poor time to remove value. It might make sense if Nikon were trying to compete at a lower pice, but I have not seen signs of Nikon USA dropping the price of the EDG. If this drives sales to Swarovski and Zeiss, then they may be less likely to want to follow Nikon's lead.

Leica gets criticized every so often on the forum for their warranty and it appears to discourage some from purchasing the product. The new Nikon warranty now has similarities to Leica so they may face the same problem.

Maybe Nikon does not care much about their sales volume for the high end because they do not have that much to loose. However they are big in the mid and low end with the Monarch and Aculon series. The problem they face is some of there competitors such as Zen-Ray, Vortex, Vanguard, etc offer better warranties. Just like in the high end, the comparisons between the different brands can be very close so it may be the little things like warranty that determine who gets the sale.
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Old Wednesday 15th October 2014, 22:44   #4
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I put in a max bid of $810 on these and lost them in the last three or four seconds.http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-EDG-10...vip=true&rt=nc If they had a warranty, I would have bid considerably more.
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Old Thursday 16th October 2014, 00:26   #5
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Originally Posted by bh46118 View Post
I put in a max bid of $810 on these and lost them in the last three or four seconds.http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-EDG-10...vip=true&rt=nc If they had a warranty, I would have bid considerably more.
You were very lucky you did not buy it!


Look at the Product# given for the 10 x 42 binocular shown in the link on the sale site: It is 7562. That is the Product number for the discontinued 10 x 42 EDG I. See the link to the archived Nikon binoculars below.

http://www.nikonsportoptics.com/Niko...inoculars.html

Bob

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Old Thursday 16th October 2014, 03:37   #6
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Hi Bob

In the pictures they have the single hinge?


Quote:
Originally Posted by ceasar View Post
You were very lucky you did not buy it!


Look at the Product# given for the 10 x 42 binocular shown in the link on the sale site: It is 7562. That is the Product number for the discontinued 10 x 42 EDG I. See the link to the archived Nikon binoculars below.

http://www.nikonsportoptics.com/Niko...inoculars.html

Bob
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Old Thursday 16th October 2014, 08:42   #7
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"Nikon warranty" an example of an oxymoron
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Old Thursday 16th October 2014, 09:34   #8
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I was thinking of getting one of the Nikon 8x30 Monarch 7 , but I am having seconds thoughts now.
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Old Thursday 16th October 2014, 10:34   #9
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Originally Posted by bh46118 View Post
Hi Bob

In the pictures they have the single hinge?
Yes.

It's the one pictured in the middle of the page which sold for $820.00. All the information about the binocular is given including the product number which is for a double hinged Nikon 10x42.

Bob

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Old Thursday 16th October 2014, 10:46   #10
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Originally Posted by David in NC View Post
"Nikon warranty" an example of an oxymoron
It worked for me. I got a brand new free replacement EDG from them in July which is also fully covered. If something goes wrong with that one I could also get it replaced for free at their option.

Bob
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Old Thursday 16th October 2014, 18:58   #11
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Originally Posted by mooreorless View Post
I was thinking of getting one of the Nikon 8x30 Monarch 7 , but I am having seconds thoughts now.
Steve ... I suspect you are not the only one.

I purchased an 8X30 Monarch 7 the beginning of September just before a camping trip, unaware of the warranty changes. I first looked at the Warranty card a few days ago after reading Bob's comments about the card that came with his EDG replacement. As with Bob, my Monarch 7 has the new Limited Lifetime Warranty. That did not make my day.

Even with the warranty change, I am still glad to have this binocular. It does have some quirks, but the light weight, handling and quality of view makes it worthwhile. The problem is that there is really no practical alternative for me if I want this type of binocular. ( I did not like the Mojave.) The warranty is not as good as it was, but the impact is minor for me because I do not have plans to flip it and accidental damage is unlikely because I am careful with my binoculars. Cost was $296 (with the then instant rebate promotion) which is more than pocket change, but it would not be the end of the world if it ended up a total loss.


My view is different when it comes to the EDG which is considerably more money. I have been considering acquiring a high end 8X42 and had it narrowed down to the EDG and the Swaro SLC, but postponed a decision when I heard about the Zeiss SF coming out. My short list then consisted of the EDG, the SF and SLC. To me, they are all equivalent, each having plus and minus features. The EDG is now off the list with the warranty change. I have no desire to reward Nikon when I have other good alternatives.

Think about getting the Monarch 7 from somewhere with a good return policy (like B& H Photo), then see how much you like them. If they turn out to be a winner for you, then forget about the warranty changes and enjoy them. They seem to one of those products that owners really like or hate. The biggest issue is somewhat touchy eye placement. If you can adjust to that, then other issues are reduced, such as blackouts and glare. Fortunately for me, I was able to adjust. If there were an alternative product acceptable to me, then I would go for it, but it looks like Nikon wins this round, at least with the Monarch 7 8X30!

Side note: To bad Brock is not posting right now. I would like to hear his views on the Nikon changes.
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Old Friday 17th October 2014, 06:04   #12
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Bruce, thanks for starting this interesting thread. Thanks especially for providing the attachments of the Warranty/Policy documents. This is actually the first time I've seen the No Fault Policy (big P) certificate, although I've got several binoculars which probably should have had them.

I would place a lot of weight on that certificate. It's in writing. It's language is clear. The buyer, at least in part, likely based his buying decision on it's existence. It seems to me that if a consumer has relied on Nikon's representation that the binocular would have coverage under a No Fault Policy, then the Policy (big P) is part of the purchase contract, and Nikon can't unilaterally cancel it.

Having said that, the certificate does not say that No Fault is transferable, nor does it say that it extends past the 25 year term of the Limited Warranty. It may have been Nikon's policy (small p) to allow these previously, but they could likely change this sort of policy at their own discretion.

Bottom line: The way I see it, if you're the original owner of a pair of binoculars which came with the No Fault Policy, then you probably have a right to that service at least during your first 25 years of ownership. However, if you sell the binoculars or if they're older than the original Limited Warranty, then it's basically up to Nikon if they want to extend the No Fault coverage, and right now they don't seem inclined to do so.

By the way, has anybody noticed that Zeiss's No Fault coverage is also called a "Policy"? (see pic.)
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Old Friday 17th October 2014, 09:58   #13
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This discussion goes back at least to 2011. Nikon had a policy called "No Fault" that is no more. The PDF shown around the Net never came with any Nikon bin I purchased...specific warranties did.

When people come to the Net to brag about buying used gear that is immediately returned and replaced with new gear someone listens. They also observe the subsequent uptick in repairs. My guess is the No-Fault policy became a real money drain and so it was ended. That's business. Sales lost to the policy change are probably a small fraction of the savings.


Quote:
Originally Posted by peatmoss View Post
Bruce, thanks for starting this interesting thread. Thanks especially for providing the attachments of the Warranty/Policy documents. This is actually the first time I've seen the No Fault Policy (big P) certificate, although I've got several binoculars which probably should have had them.

I would place a lot of weight on that certificate. It's in writing. It's language is clear. The buyer, at least in part, likely based his buying decision on it's existence. It seems to me that if a consumer has relied on Nikon's representation that the binocular would have coverage under a No Fault Policy, then the Policy (big P) is part of the purchase contract, and Nikon can't unilaterally cancel it.

Having said that, the certificate does not say that No Fault is transferable, nor does it say that it extends past the 25 year term of the Limited Warranty. It may have been Nikon's policy (small p) to allow these previously, but they could likely change this sort of policy at their own discretion.

Bottom line: The way I see it, if you're the original owner of a pair of binoculars which came with the No Fault Policy, then you probably have a right to that service at least during your first 25 years of ownership. However, if you sell the binoculars or if they're older than the original Limited Warranty, then it's basically up to Nikon if they want to extend the No Fault coverage, and right now they don't seem inclined to do so.

By the way, has anybody noticed that Zeiss's No Fault coverage is also called a "Policy"? (see pic.)
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Old Friday 17th October 2014, 19:22   #14
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Originally Posted by peatmoss View Post
Bruce, thanks for starting this interesting thread. Thanks especially for providing the attachments of the Warranty/Policy documents. This is actually the first time I've seen the No Fault Policy (big P) certificate, although I've got several binoculars which probably should have had them.

I would place a lot of weight on that certificate. It's in writing. It's language is clear. The buyer, at least in part, likely based his buying decision on it's existence. It seems to me that if a consumer has relied on Nikon's representation that the binocular would have coverage under a No Fault Policy, then the Policy (big P) is part of the purchase contract, and Nikon can't unilaterally cancel it.

Having said that, the certificate does not say that No Fault is transferable, nor does it say that it extends past the 25 year term of the Limited Warranty. It may have been Nikon's policy (small p) to allow these previously, but they could likely change this sort of policy at their own discretion.

Bottom line: The way I see it, if you're the original owner of a pair of binoculars which came with the No Fault Policy, then you probably have a right to that service at least during your first 25 years of ownership. However, if you sell the binoculars or if they're older than the original Limited Warranty, then it's basically up to Nikon if they want to extend the No Fault coverage, and right now they don't seem inclined to do so.

By the way, has anybody noticed that Zeiss's No Fault coverage is also called a "Policy"? (see pic.)
Brilliant analysis, Peatmoss. I've attached pg. 15-16 of the 1012 Eagle Optics Catalog. Note at the top of pg. 15:
Quote:
Nikon Binoculars
Nikon 25-year limited warranty plus Nikon’s No-Fault Repair/Replacement policy
So, anyone who purchased one of the Nikon binoculars listed in the catalog has a clear right to that service, because it was purchased with that understanding. Although Nikon can maintain that they have an "option" to change their policy, until it's tried in a court and proven to be true, it's only an assertion.

Ed
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Old Friday 17th October 2014, 20:06   #15
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Originally Posted by elkcub View Post
Brilliant analysis, Peatmoss. I've attached pg. 15-16 of the 1012 Eagle Optics Catalog. Note at the top of pg. 15:

So, anyone who purchased one of the Nikon binoculars listed in the catalog has a clear right to that service, because it was purchased with that understanding. Although Nikon can maintain that they have an "option" to change their policy, until it's tried and proven true it's only an assertion.

Ed
Exactly! You have the right to all the benefits of a policy that Nikon can change at any time. The policy, according to Nikon, now covers nothing. Enjoy nothing. Now that's something!
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Old Friday 17th October 2014, 21:19   #16
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It's called "holding the (bin) bag."
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Old Saturday 18th October 2014, 00:10   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceH View Post
Steve ... I suspect you are not the only one.

I purchased an 8X30 Monarch 7 the beginning of September just before a camping trip, unaware of the warranty changes. I first looked at the Warranty card a few days ago after reading Bob's comments about the card that came with his EDG replacement. As with Bob, my Monarch 7 has the new Limited Lifetime Warranty. That did not make my day.

Even with the warranty change, I am still glad to have this binocular. It does have some quirks, but the light weight, handling and quality of view makes it worthwhile. The problem is that there is really no practical alternative for me if I want this type of binocular. ( I did not like the Mojave.) The warranty is not as good as it was, but the impact is minor for me because I do not have plans to flip it and accidental damage is unlikely because I am careful with my binoculars. Cost was $296 (with the then instant rebate promotion) which is more than pocket change, but it would not be the end of the world if it ended up a total loss.


My view is different when it comes to the EDG which is considerably more money. I have been considering acquiring a high end 8X42 and had it narrowed down to the EDG and the Swaro SLC, but postponed a decision when I heard about the Zeiss SF coming out. My short list then consisted of the EDG, the SF and SLC. To me, they are all equivalent, each having plus and minus features. The EDG is now off the list with the warranty change. I have no desire to reward Nikon when I have other good alternatives.

Think about getting the Monarch 7 from somewhere with a good return policy (like B& H Photo), then see how much you like them. If they turn out to be a winner for you, then forget about the warranty changes and enjoy them. They seem to one of those products that owners really like or hate. The biggest issue is somewhat touchy eye placement. If you can adjust to that, then other issues are reduced, such as blackouts and glare. Fortunately for me, I was able to adjust. If there were an alternative product acceptable to me, then I would go for it, but it looks like Nikon wins this round, at least with the Monarch 7 8X30!

Side note: To bad Brock is not posting right now. I would like to hear his views on the Nikon changes.
Bruce,

I had a chance to try the Nikon 8x30 7 thanks to PhilR when he was kind enough to send it to Brock and I had use of it after Brock. I really liked it a lot and one reason I was interested in buying one.

http://www.birdforum.net/showpost.ph...9&postcount=19
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Old Sunday 19th October 2014, 06:51   #18
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This discussion goes back at least to 2011. Nikon had a policy called "No Fault" that is no more. The PDF shown around the Net never came with any Nikon bin I purchased...specific warranties did.

When people come to the Net to brag about buying used gear that is immediately returned and replaced with new gear someone listens. They also observe the subsequent uptick in repairs. My guess is the No-Fault policy became a real money drain and so it was ended. That's business. Sales lost to the policy change are probably a small fraction of the savings.
Hello Pileatus. I'm actually pretty curious as to what years Nikon actually promoted the No Fault Policy. I'm assuming that neither my SE (504xxx) nor my Premier HGL (300xxx) have any reference to it is because they pre-date it's commencement. On the other hand, I bought a pair of cheap Action Extremes a couple of years ago that had a No Fault Policy sticker on the box (pic below). In my view, that sticker is enough to trigger the No Fault coverage as far as that particular binocular is concerned. Nikon can't put something in writing and then claim that there are no consequences to doing this. They're stuck with this liability.

I do agree that this is an expensive business practice, and the expense of it probably convinced Nikon to discontinue it for new products. It can't make good business sense to have to give away free Actions or Travellites every few years. If I were Nikon, I would reconsider their decision to no longer offer the No Fault Policy at least as far as the high end models such as the EDG are concerned because those are the customer relationships that you want to nurture. But for the lower end models, it probably doesn't make sense to offer it.
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Old Sunday 19th October 2014, 10:57   #19
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My post #17 Steve C sent the 8x30 to Brock and I got it from Brock.
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Old Sunday 19th October 2014, 11:05   #20
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Originally Posted by peatmoss View Post
Hello Pileatus. I'm actually pretty curious as to what years Nikon actually promoted the No Fault Policy. I'm assuming that neither my SE (504xxx) nor my Premier HGL (300xxx) have any reference to it is because they pre-date it's commencement. On the other hand, I bought a pair of cheap Action Extremes a couple of years ago that had a No Fault Policy sticker on the box (pic below). In my view, that sticker is enough to trigger the No Fault coverage as far as that particular binocular is concerned. Nikon can't put something in writing and then claim that there are no consequences to doing this. They're stuck with this liability.

I do agree that this is an expensive business practice, and the expense of it probably convinced Nikon to discontinue it for new products. It can't make good business sense to have to give away free Actions or Travellites every few years. If I were Nikon, I would reconsider their decision to no longer offer the No Fault Policy at least as far as the high end models such as the EDG are concerned because those are the customer relationships that you want to nurture. But for the lower end models, it probably doesn't make sense to offer it.
Nikon's "policy" is not a contract or warranty but a policy Nikon has apparently abandoned in favor of a limited lifetime warranty. I'm not sure what the problem is since not one specific repair issue has been reported.
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Old Sunday 19th October 2014, 11:16   #21
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Look at it from the manufacturers side….

So, if a company is doing well, for the moment, and are kind to offer, but not obliged to, for a while, a service not specified in the warranty of the product, to fix customer products at no cost or a small fee, a service rendered as long as the company can afford it or want to give it for some reason, what would you call/name this kind of service that can be terminated at will ?
Maybe “Temporary good-will service” only mentioned on the company home page as long as they are kind to give it ?

It seems that to call this kind of temporary service I suggested above a “No-fault policy” and put a sticker on the products is not a good idea since customers will think it will last forever….

I think Nikon No-fault policy has only been given to one country in the whole world...USA, is that correct ?



I tried to search after some definitions:

No-fault compensation http://thelawdictionary.org/no-fault-compensation/
Without having to prove any other party was at fault in an accident, an aggrieved party is awarded compensation. Workmen's compensation is no-fault compensation. It is a legal rule in some jurisdictions. like New Zealand. Also refer to no fault law.

Insurance http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/insurance
A contract is considered to be insurance if it distributes risk among a large number of persons through an enterprise that is engaged primarily in the business of insurance. Warranties or service contracts for merchandise, for example, do not constitute insurance. They are not issued by insurance companies, and the risk distribution in the transaction is incidental to the purchase of the merchandise. Warranties and service contracts are thus exempt from strict insurance laws and regulations.

No-fault insurance http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-fault_insurance
In its broadest sense, no-fault insurance is any type of insurance contract under which insureds are indemnified for losses by their own insurance company, regardless of fault in the incident generating losses. In this sense, it is no different from first-party coverage. However, the term "no-fault" is most commonly used in the context of state/provincial automobile insurance laws in the United States, Canada, and Australia, in which a policyholder (and his/her passengers) are not only reimbursed by the policyholder’s own insurance company without proof of fault, but also restricted in the right to seek recovery through the civil-justice system for losses caused by other parties

Policy http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/policy
The general principles by which a government is guided in its management of public affairs, or the legislature in its measures. A general term used to describe all contracts of insurance.
As applied to a law, ordinance, or Rule of Law, the general purpose or tendency considered as directed to the welfare or prosperity of the state or community.


Policy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Policy
Policy differs from rules or law. While law can compel or prohibit behaviors (e.g. a law requiring the payment of taxes on income), policy merely guides actions toward those that are most likely to achieve a desired outcome.

Warranty http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/warranty
An assurance, promise, or guaranty by one party that a particular statement of fact is true and may be relied upon by the other party.
Warranties are used in a variety of commercial situations. In many instances a business may voluntarily make a warranty. In other situations the law implies a warranty where no express warranty was made. Most warranties are made with respect to real estate, insurance, and sales and leases of goods and services.


No-fault policy on Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?...ecial%3ASearch
The page "No-fault policy" does not exist. You can ask for it to be created, but consider checking the search results below to see whether the topic is already covered.


No-fault policy did show on top at Google search only concerning employees and cars, connected to insurances.

Anders
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Old Monday 20th October 2014, 06:07   #22
peatmoss
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Hello Pileatus. I apologize if I'm making a mountain of a molehill. I'm not referring to any specific instance or problem with Nikon products. I'm just offering my thoughts for the benefit of any Nikon users out there whose binoculars may have included written references to the No Fault Policy, who may be concerned about the status of their rights, in light of Nikon's recent statements.
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Old Monday 20th October 2014, 06:31   #23
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Hello Binoseeker. My recollection is that No Fault insurance became popular in the US back in the 1980s in the automobile insurance field. Previously, if an insured had an auto accident, his insurer would scrutinize the circumstances of the accident to determine if the insured had been culpable in the auto accident, in order to determine if it had grounds to deny the insured's claim. With No Fault policies, the insurer generally agreed to pay claims regardless of any culpability on the insured's part. Nowadays, this sort of policy is well established in the auto insurance industry, but perhaps not so in other areas. Of course, this does not prevent any company from offering this sort of coverage if they so choose.

In this vein, Nikon (and also Zeiss) apparently invented a new term called No Fault Policy for their products. I think we are both in agreement that, if Nikon didn't intend to honor this sort of representation well into the future, then they probably should not have written it on either paper or box. It probably would have been a much better idea to simply offer a traditional warranty that only covered manufacturing defects, but then quietly (and unofficially) been lenient towards users whose binoculars were obviously damaged through their own misuse.
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Old Monday 20th October 2014, 11:40   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peatmoss View Post
Hello Pileatus. I apologize if I'm making a mountain of a molehill. I'm not referring to any specific instance or problem with Nikon products. I'm just offering my thoughts for the benefit of any Nikon users out there whose binoculars may have included written references to the No Fault Policy, who may be concerned about the status of their rights, in light of Nikon's recent statements.
No problem and I do understand the concerns. We own several Nikon products (bins and scope) purchased at a time when the No-Fault was advertised. I never received a box with a No_Fault sticker and I had to track down the No_Fault PDF on my own. I printed a copy but assumed it was a courtesy extended by Nikon that could change at any time.

I hope the current Nikon USA rep joins the discussion to offer clarification.
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Old Monday 20th October 2014, 17:07   #25
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Hello Peatmoss,
Thanks for the explanation.

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