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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 17:58   #26
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With a bird list such as yours, I'm slightly shocked that you can't vocally ID a Golden Plover.
To be fair - he can't identify what his ears can no longer detect!
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 18:03   #27
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However, when THE bird finally pops into my binocular’s field of vision, what is going to stop me saying, oh just a chiffchaff or a dunlin? And moving on
Yes, that happens. Myself, I'm not a twitcher and not specifically looking for rarities or striving to be the first to discover something. But it has happened to me that something that I found and was puzzled about but concluded "it's probably nothing" a few days later got identified as a rarity by a reputable, more experienced birder. Not that I care (it's nice to know that it was not just my imagination) but it makes me wonder how much else I have missed over the years.

Apart from rarities at home, I know I'm missing some birds when birding internationally because I simply don't have the skills to separate for example some of the old world warblers. Perhaps I can narrow it down to two possible species but not knowing 100% sure which one means no tick - quite annoying, knowing either one would be a lifer.

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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 18:40   #28
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Privilege also plays a very large part - far too large - in finding birds.

It's not effort that puts you on a headland at 6.30/7 a.m for a seawatch, it's the privilege of having a residence next to the sea, or the means to get there by then from further afield.

It's not about constant effort. It is privilege that enables you to get out there and look, when the weather is less than "inspiring" and getting there unaided is dangerous.

It is privilege that gives you the opportunity to check that next spot down the road.

It is privilege that enables you to go to Kerry or Mayo to visit "mile upon mile of beaches, lagoons and estuaries completely unwatched and up for grabs".

And so on . . .
I suppose such things could be considered a privilege...but hardly an unobtainable one. I've said it before, and will say it again, if you can run across the country to twitch a bird, you can do it to find one.

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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 18:55   #29
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I suppose such things could be considered a privilege...but hardly an unobtainable one. I've said it before, and will say it again, if you can run across the country to twitch a bird, you can do it to find one.

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Actually, for a lot of people (and more so now than in the past), a car is a very unobtainable item. And - with the coming climate crisis - perhaps one that people should not be seeking to obtain, either.
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 19:02   #30
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Privilege also plays a very large part - far too large - in finding birds.

It's not effort that puts you on a headland at 6.30/7 a.m for a seawatch, it's the privilege of having a residence next to the sea, or the means to get there by then from further afield.

It's not about constant effort. It is privilege that enables you to get out there and look, when the weather is less than "inspiring" and getting there unaided is dangerous.

It is privilege that gives you the opportunity to check that next spot down the road.

It is privilege that enables you to go to Kerry or Mayo to visit "mile upon mile of beaches, lagoons and estuaries completely unwatched and up for grabs".

And so on . . .
Too true. I've heard it said x is such a good finder of rare birds. It's back to that time in the field thing. Stick me on the east coast of Yorkshire, anywhere, between September and October, and my chances will improve compared to how I usually spend that time in front of a computer screen in Leeds.

Yes, there's field skill, technique, learning calls, picking the weather etc. but it's common sense, and maybe less of a mystery than you think.
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 19:08   #31
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Too true. I've heard it said x is such a good finder of rare birds. It's back to that time in the field thing. Stick me on the east coast of Yorkshire, anywhere, between September and October, and my chances will improve compared to how I usually spend that time in front of a cmputer screen in Leeds.

Yes, there's field skill, technique, learning calls, picking the weather etc. but it's common sense, and maybe less of a mystery than you think.
Yep!

Query: what's the earliest in the morning you'd be able to get to Flamboro' or Spurn? Transport is limited to foot, bicycle, or (in pre-covid times only) bus.
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 19:17   #32
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Actually, for a lot of people (and more so now than in the past), a car is a very unobtainable item. And - with the coming climate crisis - perhaps one that people should not be seeking to obtain, either.
My thoughts as well. And then there is work...often leaving a tired zombie in the evenings let alone being able to get up early in the weekends. Most avid, active birders I meet are pensioned, unemployed for whatever reason, have self-sustaining jobs (or otherwise established income) with choice of working hours or working in nature conservation etc. I often can't even find the concentration to study birds at home (sounds f.i.) after a full day's hard labor, let alone bike 15km to nearest nice-ish birding spot and back, when weather is kind enough to allow. Practical privileges are not to be taken for granted.
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 19:19   #33
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To be fair - he can't identify what his ears can no longer detect!
Thanks for your support. It’s a very sad experience watching a grasshopper warbler reeling away 20 yards from you and not hear a thing.
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 20:28   #34
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Yep!

Query: what's the earliest in the morning you'd be able to get to Flamboro' or Spurn? Transport is limited to foot, bicycle, or (in pre-covid times only) bus.
Crikey! It would be a nightmare. I'm in Wetherby, so for Spurn I'm really not sure how I'd get to Spurn without using a train. It would be bus from Wetherby to Leeds; that's about an hour, but there's one around 7am. Let's say I connect with an 8.15 train to Hull, another hour, (optimistic). I'd then get the bus to Withernsea, another hour. I'd probably then have to get a taxi. 10.30-11? In reality, probably nearer to midday.

As for Flamborough, I could cycle from Wetherby to Tadcaster, 20 mins. Connect with the Coastliner bus that runs from Leeds to Scarborough - an hour, (optimistic). There's no doubt a bus from Scarborough to Brid. and then maybe a taxi out to Flamborough from Brid. All of that another hour. Again probably late morning at the very earliest.

Best option would be Filey. Bus from Wetherby to Leeds. Train from Leeds right into Filey, and the NCCP is in walking distance. Having said that there's probably not a direct train.

Put it this way if I was doing all that there'd be zero appetite for finding my own stuff on arrival!
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 20:34   #35
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 20:49   #36
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That's a pretty good point. I reckon the bit of habitat checked most infrequently by most birders (including me) is the sky right above their heads.

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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 21:25   #37
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Look up often

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That's a pretty good point. I reckon the bit of habitat checked most infrequently by most birders (including me) is the sky right above their heads.

John
Particularly when you hear anything alarm calling - gulls are really useful for that. I jammed an Osprey over the house back in May, when I heard the local gulls go spare
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Old Thursday 13th August 2020, 21:39   #38
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Crikey! It would be a nightmare. I'm in Wetherby, so for Spurn I'm really not sure how I'd get to Spurn without using a train. It would be bus from Wetherby to Leeds; that's about an hour, but there's one around 7am. Let's say I connect with an 8.15 train to Hull, another hour, (optimistic). I'd then get the bus to Withernsea, another hour. I'd probably then have to get a taxi. 10.30-11? In reality, probably nearer to midday.

As for Flamborough, I could cycle from Wetherby to Tadcaster, 20 mins. Connect with the Coastliner bus that runs from Leeds to Scarborough - an hour, (optimistic). There's no doubt a bus from Scarborough to Brid. and then maybe a taxi out to Flamborough from Brid. All of that another hour. Again probably late morning at the very earliest.

Best option would be Filey. Bus from Wetherby to Leeds. Train from Leeds right into Filey, and the NCCP is in walking distance. Having said that there's probably not a direct train.

Put it this way if I was doing all that there'd be zero appetite for finding my own stuff on arrival!
Wow! Indeed! And have to hope there's secure parking for the bike at the station.


I'm not quite so badly off, but it's still an hour's slog for me to get to the coast (in Northumbs) on bike. Not something to do in wet weather, either - so it means a reliably dry forecast for the day, which means there's unlikely to be any good birds waiting to be found! In theory, I could get a bus, but not keen on the covid risks associated.
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 00:12   #39
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Yep!

Query: what's the earliest in the morning you'd be able to get to Flamboro' or Spurn? Transport is limited to foot, bicycle, or (in pre-covid times only) bus.
This has been a perennial problem for me in all my years birding if I wanted to go further afield but also wanted an early start. It also means you can’t move from site to site once you arrive in an area, so you are pretty much committed to making the best of one location. To get to Spurn for example, the earliest train I could get at the moment is 10.30am and I would have to go via Doncaster to get to Hull.(over £90!). I would then get a taxi to Kilnsea (£30). I would arrive in Spurn around 15:00hrs. If I had a car, I would leave around 3.30am and arrive at 7am obviously being able to return the same day. Fortunately, I have had enough income to pay for numerous B&Bs over the years for long weekends just so I can get early starts. The last time I went to Spurn for example I stayed in Easington for a long weekend where I met up with some birding pals to get down to the Obs and then just walked alone around Easington or to the lighthouse etc from first light to dark.

When I was in my late teens though and in my 20s I just hitched everywhere including around Europe.Now, due to a chronic health condition even that’s become much harder as using public transport/carrying optics on long journeys is exhausting for me and I not even sure I should be taking the risk of using public transport at the moment.

I’m so glad this was mentioned because I agree, it’s not always a level playing field if you are unable to drive and it gets harder as you get older even getting to a hotel or B&B. The other issue is a car allows you to follow the weather. So I agree a big key to finding rarities is mobility!

The other issue is forecasts are often wrong or wind direction can change on a dime. If you have a car you can be more spontaneous. Last September, I paid for 3 nights B&B within walking distance of Cley, Salthouse etc. It had forecasted Easterlies for that weekend with fine weather for days. The night before I left, the weather changed. It didnt stop raining for 2 full days along with kicking up a steady South Westerly all weekend. Not what you need for picking up rarities on the Norfolk coast but As I had booked in advance, paid for my train tickets in advance and booked Friday and Monday off work, I was committed. Needless to say, ‘interesting’ amounted to 2 Ring Ouzels, 3 YBW and 2 putative Sibe Chiffies and no rarities. The Easterlies that were forecasted started the evening I arrived home and I was too done in to go back. That little jaunt cost me about £300 even living on cup a soups all weekend to save money! BUT it was brilliant because I was birding from literally dawn until dark evey day.
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 00:38   #40
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As a keen self-finder having an "always birding" mindset has paid dividends for me.

There are the special moments - like when Hong Kong's third Red-footed Booby flew past my 27th storey window as I looked out first thing in the morning, and the Hoopoe in the smoking area outside my office - but these come from trying to identify every bird from a car/train/dog walk with or without bins. This constant practice tunes you in to what the common birds look like, so the special birds stand out right away. As the golfer Gary Player famously said "The more I practice, the luckier I get".

I guess this would go down as "effort" in Owen's list - and I would agree with that, but my point is that you don't have to be out birding to be making the effort and learning how little you need to see of a bird to nail down an ID.

I would also highly recommend patch birding. Having a list for a particular site (or sites) will create a motive to search for and identify common and less common species all over again because the motive to add to the list can stimulate you try that bit harder. And now you're in a good location, in amongst them . . .

A top class Malaysia-based birder - Dave Bakewell also recommends sketching birds as a great way to learn taxonomy and the improve your close observation skills. Personally I draw like a thumbless drunk so this doesn't work for me, but I can see the logic.

Also not yet mentioned - take a camera. They need not be expensive and some entry digital bridge cameras (I prospered with the Canon SX range) have a terrific zoom and weigh less that half a kilo, but can make all the difference for nailing down a briefly seen bird you don't have time to study.

Cheers
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 03:50   #41
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Actually, for a lot of people (and more so now than in the past), a car is a very unobtainable item. And - with the coming climate crisis - perhaps one that people should not be seeking to obtain, either.
Yes, I understand that, but again, there's a specific context here, in that the OP is talking about moving from being a twitcher to a finder. This presumes the ability to move when needed.

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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 05:02   #42
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To be fair - he can't identify what his ears can no longer detect!
Read the post again, 'We could hear them but not see them'.,.
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 07:49   #43
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Oh dear
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 11:34   #44
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One final though which is perhaps an expansion on what has already been said - consider your location relative to what you are hoping to find, and also in context of the landscape.
Somewhere like St Abbs head and Tor Ness are obvious locations for finding migrants, and as a result there are (presumably) people who covers these sites very regularly. Use google (other maps are available) to figure out what other areas look good, and where there are reporting gaps - a quick look from my available resources and cross referenced against google maps would suggest a good and potentially underwatched areas could be Pease Bay or Bilsdean. A larger site with a variety of habitats will increase your scope (assuming you are not solely interested in land birds), but try to keep it to a manageable area (an hour to cover on foot) and close enough to home that you can make multiple visits (even more than once a day if possible).
Hope this helps!
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 13:16   #45
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That's a pretty good point. I reckon the bit of habitat checked most infrequently by most birders (including me) is the sky right above their heads.

John
yes, and if you have any interest in anything else, apart from clouds!, you will be distracted by what's going on at ground level. Even Bats is mainly looking down at the bat detector or tree top height!
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 14:36   #46
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One final though which is perhaps an expansion on what has already been said - consider your location relative to what you are hoping to find, and also in context of the landscape.
Somewhere like St Abbs head and Tor Ness are obvious locations for finding migrants, and as a result there are (presumably) people who covers these sites very regularly. Use google (other maps are available) to figure out what other areas look good, and where there are reporting gaps - a quick look from my available resources and cross referenced against google maps would suggest a good and potentially underwatched areas could be Pease Bay or Bilsdean. A larger site with a variety of habitats will increase your scope (assuming you are not solely interested in land birds), but try to keep it to a manageable area (an hour to cover on foot) and close enough to home that you can make multiple visits (even more than once a day if possible).
Hope this helps!
Thanks Daniel. That’s good advice. It will also test my resolve in not being spoon fed by other birders at the more popular sites
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 20:12   #47
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Research is the key - the areas, the habitats, weather, timings etc. - but one of the keys is knowing the area you are able to or going to bird. You will get to know where the 'common' birds hang out, their contact calls (if you can hear them) and their song. Then you will notice when something is different you will also start to understand which bushes to look in and which nooks and crannies to check. Without this prep work it becomes luck and not a replicable skill.

'I always tend to see a Blackcap there or a Trush here' but ask yourself why? If I was a migrant would I be looking for the same food. Seawatching, although I'm a complete beginner, would be what was the weather pattern the last couple of days x miles to the north or the south. Migration watchpoints, cloud cover, wind direction, other watchpoints, trends etc. I tend to try and get there on the first clear day after two or three bad days, on the bad days I have other favoured spots but I'm inland at the sea you might favour the bad weather days...

Ultimately it's down to time as others have already mentioned.
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 21:21   #48
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Read the post again, 'We could hear them but not see them'.,.
I assumed that meant "we as a group ... [but not me]"
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 21:25   #49
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I assumed that meant "we as a group ... [but not me]"
You can also hear something faintly which means you don't really hear it well enough to id it or pick it up/register it until someone alerts you etc etc
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Old Friday 14th August 2020, 21:37   #50
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You can also hear something faintly which means you don't really hear it well enough to id it or pick it up/register it until someone alerts you etc etc
Nutcracker and dantheman, you are my knights in shining armour.

Personally one of my favourite sounds as a young lad was hearing EGP above 3000ft on a Scottish mountain. I haven’t been up many recently to test my hearing on that one.
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