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European Rarities

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Old Tuesday 11th December 2018, 21:10   #5451
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No written submission ever submitted, no notes available from 3 observers. Furthermore, in 1988 most observers wouldn't have even known of Balearic Shearwater, so would probably have been trying to choose only between Manx and Sooty.

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Not sure about that Mark. My first stay at Portland Obs. was in 1960, we saw Balearic Shearwaters then and I was given a copy of this paper to help me i.d. them.....
ASH,J. , & ROOKE, K. B. 1954. Balearic Shearwaters off the Dorset Coast in 1953. Brit, Birdsil:285-296.
But I agree that Balearic Shearwater won't have been on the radar of many reservoir patch workers in those days!
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Old Tuesday 11th December 2018, 21:23   #5452
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Weren't they called Mediterranean Shearwaters back then??
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Old Tuesday 11th December 2018, 21:31   #5453
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I remember them being called Balearic Shearwaters in my formative years mid 80's, then i think Yelkouan and Balearic were lumped for a decade or so and known as Mediterranean..?
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Old Tuesday 11th December 2018, 21:42   #5454
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Not sure about that Mark. My first stay at Portland Obs. was in 1960, we saw Balearic Shearwaters then and I was given a copy of this paper to help me i.d. them.....
ASH,J. , & ROOKE, K. B. 1954. Balearic Shearwaters off the Dorset Coast in 1953. Brit, Birdsil:285-296.
But I agree that Balearic Shearwater won't have been on the radar of many reservoir patch workers in those days!
Surely, by 1988, it was a well known proposed split? Indeed, in the month of the bird, the October 1988 Birding World article on the Chalice Pelagic referred to Balearic Shearwater Puffinus (puffinus) mauretanicus clearly indicating thinking.

It occurred at a time of northerlies and a Little Auk influx. I wonder if it was on Birdline that day? The Cambridgeshire Bird Report refers to excellent views in flight. I was at Cambridge at the time and had an awful Birdline habit. Didn't we all.......?

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Old Wednesday 12th December 2018, 09:31   #5455
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Surely, by 1988, it was a well known proposed split? Indeed, in the month of the bird, the October 1988 Birding World article on the Chalice Pelagic referred to Balearic Shearwater Puffinus (puffinus) mauretanicus clearly indicating thinking.

It occurred at a time of northerlies and a Little Auk influx. I wonder if it was on Birdline that day? The Cambridgeshire Bird Report refers to excellent views in flight. I was at Cambridge at the time and had an awful Birdline habit. Didn't we all.......?
Initially it was put on Birdline as a Manx Shearwater - so locals didn't rush over to see it. It was seen by just 4 observers. Later in the day it was re-identified as a Sooty Shearwater. The record was never submitted (not uncommon in those days, when things were accepted at face value), but had it been submitted the written description might have helped when the record came under review (a good example of why written submissions are always useful). I'm not sure the wind direction has much bearing on the species - good northerlies are helpful in seeing Balearic Shearwater in Norfolk! The 2013 Sooty arrived in anticyclonic conditions....

Anyway, make up your minds from the only evidence available...

http://indybirder.tripod.com/sootyshearwater.html
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Old Wednesday 12th December 2018, 09:53   #5456
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Initially it was put on Birdline as a Manx Shearwater - so locals didn't rush over to see it. It was seen by just 4 observers. Later in the day it was re-identified as a Sooty Shearwater. The record was never submitted (not uncommon in those days, when things were accepted at face value), but had it been submitted the written description might have helped when the record came under review (a good example of why written submissions are always useful). I'm not sure the wind direction has much bearing on the species - good northerlies are helpful in seeing Balearic Shearwater in Norfolk! The 2013 Sooty arrived in anticyclonic conditions....

Anyway, make up your minds from the only evidence available...

http://indybirder.tripod.com/sootyshearwater.html
A shame it is facing away on the photo on the water. I have to say it looks quite long-winged, uniform in the underparts, not particularly pot-bellied, etc to me and with the appearance of a white flash in the underside of the wing:-

http://indybirder.tripod.com/photos/sooty_301086.jpg

But you can tell he got the Little Auk right:-

http://indybirder.tripod.com/photos/...auk_301088.jpg

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Old Wednesday 12th December 2018, 10:34   #5457
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Some Hawk Owls in Finland in the last couple of days...apologies for straying off-topic...
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Old Wednesday 12th December 2018, 18:35   #5458
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Some Hawk Owls in Finland in the last couple of days...apologies for straying off-topic...
At least they understand the UK is in Europe.

The first December Pied Wheatear for the Netherlands was found on a building site in Bodegraven yesterday.

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Old Wednesday 12th December 2018, 20:38   #5459
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At least they understand the UK is in Europe
And they have every other bloody thread in this forum to go on and on and on about it...
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Old Thursday 13th December 2018, 15:00   #5460
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Canary Islands - Fuerteventura - Allen's Gallinule at Caleta de Fuste today & Dwarf Bittern - 2.5mls ESE of Tesjuate at Barranco de Rio Cabras 28.4758, -13.9030 on Monday 10.12.18.

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Old Thursday 13th December 2018, 17:08   #5461
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Canary Islands - Fuerteventura - Allen's Gallinule at Caleta de Fuste today & Dwarf Bittern - 2.5mls ESE of Tesjuate at Barranco de Rio Cabras 28.4758, -13.9030 on Monday 10.12.18.

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Old Sunday 23rd December 2018, 14:23   #5462
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Male Cretzschmar's Bunting at Skutskär, Uppland - the third national record for Sweden.
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Old Sunday 23rd December 2018, 15:50   #5463
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Crikey, from a British perspective that seems an odd time of year! Any idea if there are other late autumn or early winter records from northern Europe?
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Old Thursday 27th December 2018, 13:25   #5464
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African Crake on Sal, Cape Verde today - the tenth record for the Western Pal

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Old Wednesday 2nd January 2019, 02:07   #5465
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Brown-necked Raven at Cabo de Palos, Cartagena, Murcia (Spain). Perhaps ship-assisted given the coastal location?
Nice photos though:
https://www.reservoirbirds.com/Sight...ghtingId=43162
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Old Wednesday 2nd January 2019, 19:58   #5466
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Brown-necked Raven at Cabo de Palos, Cartagena, Murcia (Spain). Perhaps ship-assisted given the coastal location?
Nice photos though:
https://www.reservoirbirds.com/Sight...ghtingId=43162
The photo on the right shows some white markings in the flight feathers. Is it a combination of the abrasion and light?
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Old Wednesday 2nd January 2019, 22:44   #5467
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Brown-necked Raven at Cabo de Palos, Cartagena, Murcia (Spain). Perhaps ship-assisted given the coastal location?
Nice photos though:
https://www.reservoirbirds.com/Sight...ghtingId=43162
Do they commonly travel on ships? I thought Brown-necked Raven is rather shy bird not prone to closely associate with man like House Crow in Asia or Jackdaw and Hooded Crow in Europe.
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Old Wednesday 2nd January 2019, 23:48   #5468
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The photo on the right shows some white markings in the flight feathers. Is it a combination of the abrasion and light?
I'm not too sure but my first impression - and I am looking at the images on a not particularly high definition monitor - is that it looks like fouling of some kind e.g. bird droppings or white paint (the latter not unlikely if it had been on a boat). There doesn't seem to be a great deal of wear visible in the flight feathers in the open wing shot.
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Old Wednesday 2nd January 2019, 23:50   #5469
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Do they commonly travel on ships? I thought Brown-necked Raven is rather shy bird not prone to closely associate with man like House Crow in Asia or Jackdaw and Hooded Crow in Europe.
Perhaps needs must; lots of really shy birds (e.g. Quail) will land on boats if they need a rest while out over the sea. Why it might have ended up out over the sea (unlike a migrating Quail) is another question!
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Old Wednesday 2nd January 2019, 23:56   #5470
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Just had a look at the distribution of Brown-necked Raven; they occur on some islands a fair way out to sea (e.g. Socotra is 240 km offshore) so, clearly (I'm assuming that B.N Raven wasn't already present on Socotra before it became an island in the Miocene; seems very unlikely that it wouldn't have evolved into something else stuck on a remote island for several million years), oversea travel can't be unheard of.

Last edited by melodious : Thursday 3rd January 2019 at 00:03. Reason: The Socotra bit added.
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Old Thursday 3rd January 2019, 00:21   #5471
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Also on Cape Verde 570km out to sea (and islands for a minimum of 8 million years). And, if I'm understanding this correctly, Cape Verde is formed by volcanic activity and (unlike Socotra) there never was a land bridge to the continent.

Last edited by melodious : Thursday 3rd January 2019 at 00:32. Reason: Distance corrected.
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Old Thursday 3rd January 2019, 00:50   #5472
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Interestingly (according to this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o..._of_Cape_Verde ) it's the only corvid that has made it to Cape Verde and is not listed as an introduced species. So the Mediterranean wouldn't present much of a barrier to it (c.195 km direct from North Africa to the locality it was found).

Last edited by melodious : Thursday 3rd January 2019 at 00:59. Reason: Distance corrected.
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Old Thursday 3rd January 2019, 01:10   #5473
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2 King Eiders, at Tróia, Setubal, southern Portugal - 1st record for continental Portugal. https://www.reservoirbirds.com/viewi...trLanguage=CAS (maybe the closest they've ever been to Brown-necked Raven.......)

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Old Thursday 3rd January 2019, 01:38   #5474
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Simon, happen to know the official status (or any unaccepted/previously accepted records) of Brown-necked Raven in Spain (or Portugal)? Listed here;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_birds_of_Spain

but not here;

https://www.bubo.org/Checklists/soci...bird-list.html

Just guessing that the former includes a record/records from Spanish territory in North Africa (e.g. Ceuta and Melilla) but the later doesn't?

Last edited by melodious : Thursday 3rd January 2019 at 01:52.
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Old Thursday 3rd January 2019, 08:48   #5475
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A Brown-necked Raven was photographed as it came in off the sea on the Italian island of Pantelleria (only about 70 km from Cape Bon in Tunisia, which is visible from the island on a clear day) in March 2017, then found dead after colliding with a power line about a week later. The record has only recently been submitted to the Italian RC so there is no 'official' decision yet, but natural origin is certainly not out of the question.
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