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Always used 10x but thinking about switching to 8x

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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 13:59   #26
dries1
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If one is to get one glass for the majority of use, there is nothing comparable to a good 8X42.

A.W.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 14:44   #27
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If one is to get one glass for the majority of use, there is nothing comparable to a good 8X42.

A.W.
If you have big biceps like me the 8x56 is best.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 14:49   #28
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If you have big biceps like me the 8x56 is best.
Hey Dennis, I didn't realize you knew how to use Photoshop?

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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 16:00   #29
dries1
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8x56

Dennis,

One thing I like about you is that you can laugh at your self, that is a good character to have. By the way how are those 56s going.

A. W.

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If you have big biceps like me the 8x56 is best.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 16:36   #30
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Don't you find it harder to track moving targets with a 10x with it's smaller FOV? I always have.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 17:17   #31
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......... I have all 8x binoculars now for different situations and uses. A Swarovski 8x25 CL-P (Hiking,Concerts), a new Swarovski 8x30 CL (General Purpose Birding), and a new Swarovski SLC HD 8x56 (Static, Stands, Short Hikes). ........
Dennis ..... Did you get rid of the Canon 10X42 L iS?
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 17:52   #32
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Dennis ..... Did you get rid of the Canon 10X42 L iS?
Yup. I let the Canon 10x42 IS-L and the Swaro SLC HD 8x56 fight it out and the big Swaro just killed the Canon for veiling glare, CA, on-axis sharpness and especially low light performance. I buried it on Ebay. It was a quick and painless death. I guess it wasn't fair the Canon being a lightweight and the Swaro a heavyweight. I find at 8x I don't need IS and the big Swaro was the first binocular I have tried that beat the view of the Canon. Even the 10x50 SV couldn't do it.

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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 18:06   #33
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Dennis,

One thing I like about you is that you can laugh at your self, that is a good character to have. By the way how are those 56s going.

A. W.
I really think the Swarovski SLC HD 8x56 is one of the best binoculars I have ever used. I know it is a pain to carry the weight but if you are not hiking too far the view has to be seen to be appreciated. There is almost no veiling glare even when you get close to the sun, they are almost apochromatic as far as CA, the on-axis sharpness is unreal and of course with a 56mm aperture the low light performance is the best I have ever seen. There is a lot to be said for a big aperture. As the astronomers always say "Aperture Rules."
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 19:15   #34
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That is how my 10X50s feel next to a 10X42, no contest period with the larger objective. Not too many producers for that format (8X56), with a decent FOV like the older discontinued FL.

A.W.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 19:33   #35
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Apart from the strap lugs that are so annoying on your fingers every time they are raised to your eyes.
I get it, not everyone finds a perfect fit with a particular binocular, I don`t like the lug position on the NV but most have no issue, by the way are you referring to the Field Pro, or all EL`s ?
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 19:53   #36
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At night I sometimes use 7x50, but mostly 15x45 image stabilized. During the day I tested out 6x, 7x, 8x, 10x, and found that I could hold 8x steady enough to see more detail than with 6x, but it was hard to discern more detail with 10x and the motion of the binocular bothered me. I have not been impressed with my 10x or 15x IS binoculars during the day. The IS works great, but near focus, speed of focus, getting on target quickly and general comfort just are not there for me. If I want more magnification during the day I bright a spotting scope and lightweight tripod.

Surprisingly my favorite birding binocular is a 9x45, but it is not particularly because 9x is my optimal magnification, I just really love the overall package.

It's kind of funny--I my preferred binocular at night has a smaller exit pupil than my favorite binocular during the day. I need to think on that.

Alan
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 19:55   #37
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That is how my 10X50s feel next to a 10X42, no contest period with the larger objective. Not too many producers for that format (8X56), with a decent FOV like the older discontinued FL.

A.W.
You can still buy the Zeiss 8x56 FL. Henry Link's favorite binocular and for good reason. It is most likely better than all the newer smaller aperture Zeiss stuff including the SF and HT. I would imagine a really big aperture binocular on a tripod would be awesome for distance viewing. Like the Fujinon ED 40x150. Great on your deck!

https://www.eurooptic.com/Zeiss-Vict...caAoUaEALw_wcB
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PtJeSdX844

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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 20:24   #38
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At night I sometimes use 7x50, but mostly 15x45 image stabilized. During the day I tested out 6x, 7x, 8x, 10x, and found that I could hold 8x steady enough to see more detail than with 6x, but it was hard to discern more detail with 10x and the motion of the binocular bothered me. I have not been impressed with my 10x or 15x IS binoculars during the day. The IS works great, but near focus, speed of focus, getting on target quickly and general comfort just are not there for me. If I want more magnification during the day I bright a spotting scope and lightweight tripod.

Surprisingly my favorite birding binocular is a 9x45, but it is not particularly because 9x is my optimal magnification, I just really love the overall package.

It's kind of funny--I my preferred binocular at night has a smaller exit pupil than my favorite binocular during the day. I need to think on that.

Alan
Your correct 10x is so hard to hold steady for most people that any detail advantage because of the higher magnification is lost to shaking and movement. A lot of hunters mount their 10x42mm binoculars on a tripod for that reason. They can see way more detail. Then like you they have a spotter to spot a trophy animal.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 21:31   #39
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That Fuji is nice, but I like the mount for the second one. What a combo, on clear nights it would be a blast.

A.W.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 22:24   #40
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I feel that all the magnifications have their place (says the guy with too many binoculars) ; ), depending on all the variables, such as age or vision quality, distance, field of view-etc, etc. It's very dependent on use, and what you want to see. Just this morning, I found that my Nikon EII 8x30's showed me more detail immediately than my 10x roof bins (more than one model and make), in the dew drops on the grass from earlier snow flurries at about 35 yards (yes, green grass here, and snow for a while now). I was quite surprised to see that added detail, so I went back to my 10x bins that I always use, and sure enough, the detail was there, but you had to hold it steadier to notice it! When I first wake up, my eyes aren't the best a focusing, so maybe that had something to do with it too.

But sure, 8x can give you details that 10x misses, if you aren't careful, or if you choose objects you can't tell the difference right off without concentration. I don't want to give up my 10x bins, because they do reach out and give you a larger enhancement of the subject. But now I have been pleasantly surprised that 8x can actually show you more detail somtimes (mostly in closer objects), but if you aren't careful, or you are using the wrong binocular that easily shows those details, you might be fooled temporarily what works best. And of course, the larger field of viewing angle in an 8x usually is wider than the 10x view. So, yes, there are many differences between them.

I want both, and will pick my choices from what I have, and often what detail you see is very dependent on the lighting conditons in which you are viewing, I have noticed. That is another recent relevation to me about viewing and seeing through binoculars-it certainly depends on the lighting conditions at the time you are viewing. If you don't consider that too, you may be fooling yourself into more limited thinking about the view you see whenever you make a comparison, or see a scene that inspires you. There are really so many variables, let alone what each of us may percieve or notice due to individual eyesight and perception. So, discussing the finer details of binoculars and our opinions on the view, etc is surely, highly subjective, if you haven't figured that out by now!

But it's fun, and hey, life's too short to make it a battle ground here-just note what you see and go from there. It's all about you, and your choices, and how they work for you. Can you do it with one, two, or three binoculars? Some can, some can't! I like to have variable choices available, and I find that at times some are better than others for me.

Buy and try, that is my way.
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Old Sunday 25th March 2018, 22:49   #41
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Barry:

That is good common sense thinking. There is no all around preferred size for every use.

They all have their place.

Jerry
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Old Monday 26th March 2018, 02:01   #42
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Dennis,

One thing I like about you is that you can laugh at your self, that is a good character to have. By the way how are those 56s going.

A. W.
Is that the only thing?
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Old Monday 26th March 2018, 02:33   #43
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Yup. I let the Canon 10x42 IS-L and the Swaro SLC HD 8x56 fight it out and the big Swaro just killed the Canon for veiling glare, CA, on-axis sharpness and especially low light performance. I buried it on Ebay. It was a quick and painless death. I guess it wasn't fair the Canon being a lightweight and the Swaro a heavyweight. I find at 8x I don't need IS and the big Swaro was the first binocular I have tried that beat the view of the Canon. Even the 10x50 SV couldn't do it.
I do not know what to say other than may the mighty Canon rest in peace. Thanks for the update.

As to the original post on switching to an 8X, it depends. If the user can not hold a 10X, then it makes since to forget about the 10X and go with an 8X. Otherwise I am in Barry's camp. There are a variety of situations where one is a better choice than the other. Since our OP already has a 10X, then it makes sense to have some choice and go with the 8X especially considering the success in using the 8X32.

I have 8X and 10X in the same model lines and which I use depends on the "type" of viewing planned and the "mood" I am in that day. Both powers work for me. It is nice to have the choice.

Earlier today I took some out of town relatives to the local riparian. I gave them all 8X since they were new to this activity and new to binoculars. (8X32 Natura, 8X32 Guide, 8X42 Monarch HG.) If I had not been with them, I would have taken either the 8X42 MHG or an 8X42 Zeiss SF for the general viewing I enjoy at this site. Instead I used a Tract Toric I 10X42. The responsibility was on me to locate the birds in the cover and then to make the ID so that "type" of viewing lent itself to the 10X. I had a choice of 10s to choose but I was in the "mood" for the Toric mainly because it is newer to me and it has been fun using it.
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Old Monday 26th March 2018, 19:19   #44
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I think you are better off with 8x and a good spotter. Spot them with the 8x and then move in for a close up with the spotter. For birding 8x is it.
There are places where carrying (and using) a scope doesn't make much sense. Try one of the migration hotspots with lots of bushes and so on for instance. You need to make the ID very quickly, and often you just don't have the time to use your scope. If you don't the bird may well be gone for good. That's where a 10x works better for me. Or on long hikes in the mountains where I don't want to carry a scope and a tripod all the time.

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Old Tuesday 27th March 2018, 03:31   #45
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There are places where carrying (and using) a scope doesn't make much sense. Try one of the migration hotspots with lots of bushes and so on for instance. You need to make the ID very quickly, and often you just don't have the time to use your scope. If you don't the bird may well be gone for good. That's where a 10x works better for me. Or on long hikes in the mountains where I don't want to carry a scope and a tripod all the time.

Hermann
That's a good point. Definitely don't want to carry a scope on long mountain hikes.
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Old Tuesday 27th March 2018, 07:25   #46
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For the “only carry one tool” situations I still use my ageing canon 12x36 IS bins, good view, fairly wide and stable so you can pick out details easily.

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Old Tuesday 27th March 2018, 07:40   #47
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I'm more inclined to notice the drop in FoV (usually) and exit pupil than i am the 2x change in magnification with 10x. It certainly doesn't seem enough of a change to dispense with the scope (when of course a scope is appropriate).
I bought a 10x in a sale just for the comparison, but have rarely taken it out.

I think a lot depends on whether you look for an increase in objective size also when you go 8x to 10x.
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Old Tuesday 27th March 2018, 08:42   #48
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I learned all this the hard way as usual. I own three 10x lol. I'm back to the 7-8x. I even use 6x occasionally because I love the view and in hand feel in these Eagle Optics Rangers. Once I'm out in the field 7-8 seems almost identical and 8-10x for me is really mostly noticeable in comparison between the two in a test. I see more with a steady view. Sometimes I wonder how much money has gone into my learning curve in this life? I'll bet I could buy a second home lol. At least a small mobile home
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Old Tuesday 27th March 2018, 19:20   #49
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Try the 8.5x42 Swarovski el, you may find it does the lot.
My thoughts as well. If you are not satisfied with 8, maybe 8.5 is what is what you need.

I am thinking about adding a 10x56 device, possibly Swaro SLC. I think 10x only makes sense with at least a 50mm objective.
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Old Tuesday 27th March 2018, 21:42   #50
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I keep getting tempted with 10x, but have yet to pull the trigger, so have primarily a stable of 8x bins, with a few 7's, and a 6. I also have a well used pair of 15 x 50 IS Canon's that generally only come out at night..

My regular bird outing rig is an 8x bin, supplemented/augmented with a bridge camera, a Nikon p610 super zoom, which I use as a digital spotting scope when I cannot ID a distant bird with my bins. The camera weighs less than my binoculars. The image quality of extended viewing resides in the binoculars, not in the camera, btw. In that regard, a good scope would be a far superior instrument, but for a lightweight setup with a great range of useful, image stabilized magnification, it is effective. Plus its a darn good camera, if one is close enough to the bird!

I may still get a 10x, but with the camera, I'm getting roughly 25x optical magnification at the extreme end (zoom ratio is 60x), which a 10x bin doesn't really cover. I expect it will enhance viewing pleasure of closer objects a lot more than the distant ones, as odd as that may sound. Research is needed...

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