Join for FREE
It only takes a minute!
ZEISS Summer Savings - Experience unique moments of nature. Save up to £250 on selected ZEISS Binoculars - limited time only!

Welcome to BirdForum.
BirdForum is the net's largest birding community, dedicated to wild birds and birding, and is absolutely FREE! You are most welcome to register for an account, which allows you to take part in lively discussions in the forum, post your pictures in the gallery and more.

HBWAlive Key; mission accomplished or mission impossible?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
Old Monday 8th April 2019, 17:38   #1
James Jobling
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 692
HBWAlive Key; mission accomplished or mission impossible?

To assist my revisions of the Key entries, and to ensure a measure of consistency, I requested Ferran Gil of Lynx Edicions to provide me with lists of entries that included the texts, "dedication not given" and "Etymology undiscovered." I was surprised at the lists then forthcoming; the first included some 40 entries or so, the second just over 60 (some undoubtedly eponyms). For many names I have suggested etymologies or provided alternatives. Those aficionados who, over the years, have supported the Key and who like to keep up-to-date with events therein, are presented, with apologies for any repetitions, the following groups of outstanding, mainly specific names (see the appropriate Key entry for full details):

(1) Dedication not given: adamsoni, alice, annae, besti, cornelia, dorotheae, elenae, emiliae, evelynae, hectoris, helena, helenae, hildamariae, joanae, julietae, Julietata, krammeri, kvaskovskii, leocadiae, luciae, manueli, mariae, martini, menziesi, nanciae, phillipsi, phoebe, phoebei, Rauenia, royrei, sabinae, terglanei, thomassoni, vealeae, woodfordii, woodi.

(2) Etymology undiscovered: acoli, acormus, akool, Anerpous, argoondah, audoni, azreth, Bahila, calconi, christopheri, christophori, codea, condora, cubo, cuculio, dairi, danisa, daphanea, darbiski, Demelioteucus, denisea, duphaa, Eparnetes, Forpus, kot, kuru, kwini, lagepa, legerli, magdalenae, manis, Marisca, maronata, Merva, monte, mouki, Mutevodia, Nutchera, nutcheri, Osalia, Penelope, philordi, Pitalla, pseudogillia, Ptelenorhynchus, scheltobriuscha, sungu, taigoor, tatao, Timalia, tsipi, vana, Visendavis, Zanda, zanda, Zelica.

All new information and suggestions will be gratefully received and acknowledged.
James Jobling is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 8th April 2019, 18:17   #2
Taphrospilus
Registered User
 
Taphrospilus's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Munich
Posts: 1,306
krammeri as here

Quote:
...pedibus , exceptis digitis , lanatis, corpore teftaceo maculis nigris, capite, & collo albidioribus. Krammer Elench.
indeed Wilhelm Heinrich Kramer (1724-1765) as suspected in the Key as he wrote:

Quote:
Kramer W. H., Elenchus vegetabilium et animalium per Austriam inferiorem observatorum etc.

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Monday 8th April 2019 at 18:38.
Taphrospilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 8th April 2019, 18:49   #3
James Jobling
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 692
Thanks Martin. I agree with krammeri and have adjusted the Key entry accordingly. I was going to query your thoughts on adamsoni (not being able to find links with Meinertzhagen, Nicoll, or Egypt), but they have just disappeared!
James Jobling is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 8th April 2019, 18:57   #4
JustinJansen
Registered User
 
JustinJansen's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Grave, The Netherlands
Posts: 432
For Cornelia I can't find a name in the family from either Bruijn or van Renesse van Duivenbode as in the Key, so I think that link doesn't work (Hey C. J. 2010. Biographical Notes of Antonie Augustus Bruijn (1841-1890). Bogor).
__________________
Justin Jansen
The Netherlands

Last edited by JustinJansen : Tuesday 9th April 2019 at 18:06. Reason: can = can't
JustinJansen is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 8th April 2019, 19:02   #5
JustinJansen
Registered User
 
JustinJansen's Avatar

 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Grave, The Netherlands
Posts: 432
Menzies is Archibald Menzies (1754-1842) Assistant Surgeon in the Navy on the HMS Discovery (led by George Vancouver). He found the species in King George Sound, WA , the discovery is well explained here (Whittell 1954: 33-35) on the Musk Duck on 3 October 1791.
__________________
Justin Jansen
The Netherlands
JustinJansen is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Monday 8th April 2019, 21:24   #6
James Jobling
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 692
Many thanks Justin, for clearing up menziesi. I was so acclimatised to Mathews's names being unfathomable that it did not occur to me to consult my copy of Whittell! Noting what you say about "Cornelia Bruijn" I have tweaked the entry accordingly.
James Jobling is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th April 2019, 06:16   #7
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 2,093
Prinia g. adamsoni . Here is what Col. M. wrote:
One page of his manuscript is headed Prinia gracilis adamsoni Nicoll, with Prinia g. gizae as a synonym. This form is said to e more fulvescent, almost yellowish-brown, than deltce, and the under-parts to be devoid of the dark striations usually present in deltce. The distribution is given as " Giza." No record can be found of either adamsoni or gizce having been published. An examination of NicolFs specimens at Giza and of a good series in various collections in England does not substantiate these forms, and it is probable that Nicoll himself would never have published them.
Thanks to Laurent:
Looking for something else, I just ran into an online version of Nicoll's birds of Egypt. If anyone wants to see the whole thing:
Vol.1: https://blsea.nus.edu.sg/en/persiste...4-0b201f35d700 .
Since the bird was from Giza we should look for an Adamson with connection to Zoological Garden at Giza?
__________________
Mark Brown, Esq.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th April 2019, 06:31   #8
Taphrospilus
Registered User
 
Taphrospilus's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Munich
Posts: 1,306
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
I was going to query your thoughts on adamsoni (not being able to find links with Meinertzhagen, Nicoll, or Egypt), but they have just disappeared!
Yes, I removed as I realized that this was something different and not related to avoid confusion. I should have looked first into the key before placing that post.

maybe of help from here:

Quote:
Nicoll and Bonhote, of the Zoological Service ; Mr. Branch, Secretary of the Sultanieh Society of Agriculture; Mr. Adamson, chief of the First Irrigation Circle; and Mr. W. A. Maule, of the Egyptian Government Survey, are amongst those to whom I am especially indebted for help on particular aspects of the Bilharzia problem, as it presented itself in Egypt.
Which could be here:

Quote:
Arthur Marshall Adamson, Inspector-General of Irrigation, Lower Egypt
In here seems be an obituary.

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Tuesday 9th April 2019 at 06:58.
Taphrospilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th April 2019, 06:46   #9
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 2,093
"besti"
http://www.zoonomen.net/cit/RI/SP/Dend/dend00522a.jpg .
http://files.usgwarchives.net/mn/hen...923/bestji.txt .
A son of Judge James Irwin Best 1835-1919. Right time period? Steere is from Michigan.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...ge/26/mode/1up .
__________________
Mark Brown, Esq.

Last edited by mb1848 : Tuesday 9th April 2019 at 06:51.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th April 2019, 09:01   #10
Taphrospilus
Registered User
 
Taphrospilus's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Munich
Posts: 1,306
nanciae

If I look here maybe for his nice...


Quote:
Campey, Nancy Marion I (1915–2014)
Taphrospilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th April 2019, 10:01   #11
James Jobling
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 692
Martin, thanks for nanciae. The link to Mathews's extended family will also prove very useful (e.g. nea)
James Jobling is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Tuesday 9th April 2019, 21:46   #12
PScofield
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Christchurch
Posts: 43
Robert (Robin) Kemp (1871-1935) named three New Zealand birds in the Austral Avian Record in 1912. Although Kemp was primarily a conchologist he was a good friend of Iredale and did have a number of birds named after him.

In 1906 he emmigrated to New Zealand with his brother Humphrey. He lived at Umawera in the Hokianga in 1906 & 1907 (see Taranaki Herald, Volume LV, Issue 13898, 27 February 1909) and returned to England in 1908.

He published 2 names for birds he collected in Umawera and one from the Auckland Islands.

1) One can surmise that Bowdleria punctata vealeae is an honorific for a Mrs or Miss Veale. A Ms Winifred Veale was a Registered Nurse in the settlement of Herekino (near Umawera) in 1915.

2) The name phoebe is apparently not an honorific as it does not end in ae. The taxa described is a ssp of Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae that is darker and more iridescent. The name is most likely therefore to be a simple reference to the ancient Greek word Phoebe associated with Apollo also called Phoebus Apollo or "the "radiant one" ". Note that Kemp described another bird Turdinus phoebei (Bull. Br. Orn. Cl., 21 : 111). Note here the use of the suffix “–i”

3) The name kwini is an obscure Maori word that is borrowed from the English word “Queen”, the word is now spelt kuīni in Maori. The name may refer to the smaller size and demure plumage of this ssp of Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae.

P.
PScofield is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 04:08   #13
mb1848
Registered User

 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Santa Maria, California USA
Posts: 2,093
Tom Iredale said in 1951 “This is one of the most beautiful forms yet discovered…”. And he named a new subgenus after it Visendavis. This means Visendo- “which is to be looked at” and –avis bird. This is similar to another Iredale name for the genus Caligavis, (1956) The word is derived from the Latin caligo meaning obscurity and avis bird.
https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/...e/207/mode/1up .
__________________
Mark Brown, Esq.
mb1848 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 06:55   #14
Taphrospilus
Registered User
 
Taphrospilus's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Munich
Posts: 1,306
Quote:
Originally Posted by PScofield View Post
Robert (Robin) Kemp (1871-1935) named three New Zealand birds in the Austral Avian Record in 1912.
Are you sure about Robert? I ask as here is written:

Quote:
Robin Kemp was the son of Robert Kemp, and was born in North London in 1871, but was schooled in the Mendips, Somersetshire. His mother was Ellen Home, a gifted woman who did clever illustrations mostly for children's books, and Robin inherited this gift to some extent.
Therefore I feel Robert is just the fathers name and this was somehow mixed up.
Taphrospilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 07:28   #15
Calalp
Björn Bergenholtz
 
Calalp's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,106
"Robin"/Robert Kemp [jr.] was earlier dealt with here.
Calalp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 07:43   #16
Calalp
Björn Bergenholtz
 
Calalp's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,106
Addition (from a non-Latin mind!) on Visendavis, somewhat in line with Mark's Post #13; "As this bird is not a typical Paradisea, a subgenus, Visendavis, is here proposed for it until more is known about it, ...” Iredale 1948 (here) ... possibly from the Latin vīso, (to look at attentively, to view, to behold, to survey) turned into visenda (things worth notice), as of here, + avis?

For what it´s worth.

/B
--

Last edited by Calalp : Wednesday 10th April 2019 at 07:50. Reason: .
Calalp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 08:10   #17
James Jobling
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 692
Thank you, Mark and PScofield.
Visendavis should have leapt to the eye, but I was sidetracked by Iredale's association with Gregory Mathews who had little regard for the classics.
I have amended the entries for phoebe and vealeae, and you have confirmed my guess on kwini (it must be a relatively modern Maori name; I wonder if it refers to any particular queen - Maori or otherwise?)
James Jobling is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 08:55   #18
PScofield
Registered User

 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Christchurch
Posts: 43
Calalp, I got Kemps death date (d. 1/2 quarter 1935) from the "England & Wales, Death Index, 1837-2005". A Kemp family website has another Cornish Robert Kemp (d. 1949) mixed up with our man. Incidentally Kemps mothers maiden name was Horne not Home. And yes he was definately Robert.
Any one know who Mr Phoebe (in Turdinus phoebei) was - or is this just an error on Kemps part?
PScofield is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 09:18   #19
Calalp
Björn Bergenholtz
 
Calalp's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,106
Just to simplify the grasp of this thread, and to save anyone some unwarranted work (no need to start all over, to invent the wheel again, at least not on all of them):

Names in blue have been dealt with earlier here on BirdForum (some of them only as far as finding the OD, others a bit deeper) ...

Dedication not given:
adamsoni (also see post #7-8)
alice
annae
besti (see post #9)
cornelia (versus #3?)
dorotheae
elenae
emiliae
evelynae
hectoris
helena
helenae

hildamariae
joanae
julietae
Julietata

krammeri (see post #2)
kvaskovskii
leocadiae
luciae

manueli
mariae
martini
menziesi (see post #5)
nanciae (see post #10-11)
phillipsi
phoebe
(see post #12)
phoebei (see post #12)
Rauenia
royrei
sabinae
terglanei
thomassoni

vealeae (see post #12)
woodfordii
woodi


Etymology undiscovered:
acoli
acormus
akool
Anerpous
argoondah
audoni
azreth
Bahila
calconi
christopheri
christophori
codea
condora
cubo
cuculio
dairi
danisa
daphanea
darbiski
Demelioteucus
denisea

duphaa
Eparnetes
Forpus
kot
kuru
kwini (see post #12)
lagepa
legerli
magdalenae
manis

Marisca
maronata
Merva
monte
mouki
Mutevodia
Nutchera
nutcheri

Osalia
Penelope
philordi
Pitalla
pseudogillia
Ptelenorhynchus
scheltobriuscha
sungu
taigoor
tatao
Timalia
tsipi
vana
Visendavis (see post #13 & 16)
Zanda
zanda
Zelica

Use the Search functions ('Search this Forum') to see what we found (or didn't find) in each case/thread. Then use the 'Search this thread' (on each resp. page/s) to find the name itself. Focus on the names in black, the blue ones, like I wrote, have been tried (to some extent) ... the black ones would be the ones most likely to be increased/expanded with something "new".

For any keen guest, anyone not regularly here on the Bird Name Etymology Forum (as the usual core of faithful "aficionados"): Remember; simply to avoid a "guessing game", with no dedications, nor any given explanations, it´s a tricky task. Always start with the OD itself, as there could be a tiny, minor clue, or clues, found in it ... if not, it´s easy to end up all astray, in the wrong Era/s, with the wrong person/s, no connections to the Author/s, etc., etc., ... adding nothing but confusion.

And (for everyone), if giving it a try: Good luck!

Björn

PS. James, while you are "cleaning up"... you missed (or simply forgot to ask Mr Gil, for the Key's "No expl." entries! There are quite a few of them, like Mathews's; bandi, bebba, bilbali, gangi, gonada, greda, mugga, etc., etc., ... until; zamba.
--

Last edited by Calalp : Wednesday 10th April 2019 at 13:40. Reason: an unavoidable typo
Calalp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 10:32   #20
James Jobling
Registered User

 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 692
Björn, you must have read my mind. I had pondered the relative lack of Mathews's names (assumed autochthonyms), and this very morning I asked Ferran to provide a list of Key entries with the texts, "No expl." etc. Watch this space.

PS. List of no expl. now received from Ferran - it contains over 200 entries. I thought Mathews would be the main culprit, but Rafinesque 1815 steals the winners prize; most of his names are corruptive, based on earlier authors.

Last edited by James Jobling : Wednesday 10th April 2019 at 11:20.
James Jobling is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 11:46   #21
Taphrospilus
Registered User
 
Taphrospilus's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Munich
Posts: 1,306
woodfordii

At least I would disagree what's written here regarding Charles Morris Woodford (1852–1927). He was not even born when the bird was described.

Quote:
African Wood-OwlStrix woodfordii (Smith 1834) Most sources agree that the bird was named after Colonel EJA Woodward (1761-1825) an English collector of bird paintings although McKay states that it was named for Charles Morris Woodford who visited South Africa on his way to or from the Solomon Islands between 1886 and 1888.
The first guy is already mentioned in the key. Here some more information about him:
Quote:
woodfordiana: for Emperor John Alexander Woodford (1761-1835), Captain in the 17th Leicestershire Regiment, rose to Colonel, fought at Salamanca and Waterloo, also a natural history collector and dealer in bird art, had a large and valuable library. The African wood owl (Strix woodfordii) is named for him. 'Emperor' is not a title but derives from his mother's name, Mary Emperor.
But even on this plant here I would not necessarily gor for Emperor John Alexander Woodford.

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Wednesday 10th April 2019 at 13:33.
Taphrospilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 14:33   #22
Taphrospilus
Registered User
 
Taphrospilus's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Munich
Posts: 1,306
royrei

If we look here we can see a M. Royre, chirurgien-major de la Girafe (garbare la Girafe). I have no clue if this garbare was ever in Gabon.

But this gentleman could be

Quote:
Royre (Gabriel- Pierre), médecin auxiliaire de la marine
But no clear evidence that he ever was in Gabon and if the first one is the same person as Gabriel Pierre Royre. Anyway it was Jules Verreaux who may have labled the bird in the Bremen Museum here.

According to Leonore Gabriel Pierre Royre (1817-1899).

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Thursday 11th April 2019 at 11:55.
Taphrospilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 14:56   #23
Calalp
Björn Bergenholtz
 
Calalp's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,106
woodfordii as in:
• the African Wood-Owl (Ciccaba) Strix woodfordii A. SMITH 1834 (here) as "Noctua Woodfordii" a k a "West African Wood Owl" or simply "African Owl" alt. "Woodford's Owl"

With no opinion what-so-ever (this far) on the dedicatee, note that Vallance, Moore & Groves (2001) claim that Emperor John Alexander Woodford died in "1817" (here), which is somewhat backed up by him being a Fellow of the Linnean Society of London (as of here, search for the full name), only until that particular year.

There's no Woodford mentioned in the Intro (here) of Smith's multi-multi-parted Paper. And note that his only reference for this Owl, goes to "Large-eyed Owl, Latham.? History of Birds, vol. i. p. 360" (leading us here alt. here), from 1821: "In the drawings of Colonel Woodford"

The, or a (?), "Colonel Woodford" is also mentioned, in the same Work, by Latham, on page 228.

If of any help?

Björn
--

Last edited by Calalp : Wednesday 10th April 2019 at 15:14. Reason: (Ciccaba)
Calalp is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 15:02   #24
Taphrospilus
Registered User
 
Taphrospilus's Avatar

 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Munich
Posts: 1,306
woodi

I can imagine that woodi is for William W. Wood. He was on the Philippines and communicated with Steere. But all just a guess.
Taphrospilus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old Wednesday 10th April 2019, 15:15   #25
l_raty
laurent raty
 
l_raty's Avatar

 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Posts: 3,233
Rafinesque

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Jobling View Post
but Rafinesque 1815 steals the winners prize; most of his names are corruptive, based on earlier authors.
You must read his Principes fondamentaux somiologie (1814) to start understanding (a bit) what he did. Rafinesque built his own, complex system of nomenclatural rules (that no one but him ever started to use, so far as I'm aware), which invalidated a significant number of names. In Analyse (1815), he then replaced a considerable number of names in application to his rules, but indeed without explaining which rule(s) was/were causing the problem(s) -- he wrote that he would explain the changes he adopted there elsewhere (see [p. 51]) but never did -- thus we can only guess, which in most cases is quite difficult due to the complexity of the system.


One of the names flagged as "no expl." in the Key and cited from Analyse actually dates from Principes, and was explained there: Anseria Rafinesque 1814 -
Quote:
65.: 33. Règle. Les noms génèriques qui sont formés par la soustraction ou l'addition d'une ou plusieurs lettres ou syllabes au commencement ou à la fin d'un autre nom générique, ne peuvent pas être tolérés, il fant les changer ou en altérer la terminaison en telle sorte que le Genre radical devienne méconnaissable.
Obs. Cette règle se lie avec la précédente & elles se supportent réciproquement, les Genres Talpa L. & Catalpa J., Bromelia L. & Melia L., Cancer L. & Anser Brisson, Sinapis L. & Apis L. en sont des exemples; il faut dans tous les cas semblables conserver le nom antérieur (à moins qu'il ne soit d'ailleurs moins convenable) & modifier les autres; ainsi il faudra adopter Catalpium R., Ananas T., Anseria R. & Apicula R. au lieu de Catalpa, Bromelia, Anser & Apis.
Anseria Rafinesque 1814 was explicitly proposed to replace Anser Brisson, which Rafinesque regarded as conflicting with (preoccupied by -- sort of) the crab genus name Cancer Linnaeus 1758, because he did not admit generic names differing only in the presence/absence of one or more letter(s) at the start or end of the word.


One rule that seems to have been rather important to him was that, in his view, a generic name was ideally 3-4 syllables; 2- and 5-syllable names were admissible, but only if they did not break any other rule. (Even "soft" rules, that in isolation would have made the name "less good", but not not per se unacceptable.) Monosyllabic names and less-than-perfect disyllabic names had to be lengthened, names with more than 5 syllables, and presumably less-than-perfect 5-syllable names, had to be shortened (even if this was at the cost of corrupting the stems).


In the Key, a number of names that are replacement names in Analyse, are apparently not readily interpreted as such. In Rafinesque's lists of animals in this work, each recognised taxonomic genus received a number. When two names were placed under the same number, these names were treated as synonyms -- the first name, often attributed to Rafinesque himself, being then intended to replace/be used instead of the second one, which was felt improper for some reason.

Thus, to stay with wildfowl, Anassus Rafinesque 1815 -
Quote:
Sous-famille. ANSERINIA. Les Ansèriens. Bec large, sans crêtes ni places nues sur la tête. G. 8. Anseria R. 9. Anassus R. Anas L. 10. Camploris R. 11. Solmorincus.
...is a replacement name for Anas Linnaeus 1758, used here for the ninth genus of family "Serrirostria" (with Anas cited as a synonym). Possibly (?) conflicting with Ananas (accepted in Principes; Anas is senior, but shorter than ideal, which might have made the preference lean towards Ananas). I'd suggest that Anassus may be best interpreted as a simple, arbitrary, lengthening of Anas. (And it is in any case not a synonym of Anser.)

Similarly, Sularius Rafinesque 1815 -
Quote:
2. Sous famille PLOTTIDIA. Les Plottidiens. Bec serreté. G. 4. Sularius R. Sula Lac. 5. Phaeton L. 6. Plottus L.
...is a replacement name for Sula (attributed to Lacépède by Rafinesque), presumably also formed by arbitrary lengthening of the original disyllabic name -- which may also have conflicted with some other name, albeit I'm not clear which.
(There is no need of a question mark in "?syn. Sula". Also, saying that Sularius is "placed in Ptiopodia, sub-family Plottidia, before Sula" as the Key currently does is a bit misleading, as this suggests that Sula was treated as valid and distinct. It was neither.)

Last edited by l_raty : Wednesday 10th April 2019 at 16:18.
l_raty is offline  
Reply With Quote
Advertisement
Reply


Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mission impossible! rachk116 New Zealand 10 Sunday 1st March 2015 21:40
Mission Impossible.......? KenM Bird Ringing and Banding 5 Wednesday 4th June 2014 07:32
Impossible Mission. N. Sweden. tarzzz Bird Identification Q&A 7 Thursday 22nd May 2014 06:15
Starling/Waxwing Mission Impossible BrockwellBee Bird Identification Q&A 4 Sunday 27th February 2011 20:43
UK. Your mission should you choose it... pipit impossible. Fozzybear Bird Identification Q&A 4 Tuesday 22nd June 2010 12:21



Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites

Help support BirdForum

Page generated in 0.16877198 seconds with 38 queries
All times are GMT. The time now is 23:39.