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Pond Minibeast

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Old Saturday 22nd May 2004, 21:19   #1
Sleeper
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Pond Minibeast

I have recently added a small (6'x5') pond to the garden.

I have been intrigued to find a few minibeasts arrive some of which I have been able to ID

including a rat tailed maggot.

One which i cannot find a reference to is a small (2mm) dark coloured critter which moves around along the edges and surface of the pond. it moves in a S squiggle movement which happens when you touch the waters surface.

Could anybody provide any info or maybe recommend a book which contains good pond info relating to creatures contained in a pond.

Thanks in advance.
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Old Monday 31st May 2004, 15:36   #2
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Wink Old but still useful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleeper
I have recently added a small (6'x5') pond to the garden.

I have been intrigued to find a few minibeasts arrive some of which I have been able to ID

including a rat tailed maggot.

One which i cannot find a reference to is a small (2mm) dark coloured critter which moves around along the edges and surface of the pond. it moves in a S squiggle movement which happens when you touch the waters surface.

Could anybody provide any info or maybe recommend a book which contains good pond info relating to creatures contained in a pond.

Thanks in advance.
Stepen, one that i used to have when we had a pond and found informative was the observers book of pond life. There will be loads more up to date one's no doubt, but a good starter.
bert.
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Old Monday 31st May 2004, 20:47   #3
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Thanks Bert

I will be looking through many a book at the BBWF and so I will keep my eye open for this one. Thanks again.
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Old Tuesday 1st June 2004, 01:19   #4
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Stephen,

It could be a Whirlygig Beetle. Take a look here - www.bugguide.net/node/view/3646

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Old Wednesday 2nd June 2004, 21:13   #5
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Thanks Rich

Great site to wander through and I think it is one which seems to be growing. Thanks again.
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Old Thursday 3rd June 2004, 06:34   #6
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Just a remark: An adult beetle can´t grow any more; and the larvae which are the growing stage, do look extremly different from an adult beetle (not only in whirligig beetles, but in all of them- that´s different in bugs (Heteroptera)).

To Identify your minibeast more infos would be usefull: under water or on the water surface? does it have a tail? How big exactly?

Other possibilities would be for example a moskito pupa; or a water mite? but for a safe id more info is nessecary

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Old Thursday 3rd June 2004, 12:08   #7
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Stephen,

No problem! Although the site seems to deal with North American stuff, it is very interesting, and the pic of the Whirlygig beetle is pretty good.

Jörn - I obviously agree with what you said. Although from the description Stephen gave it so has to be a Whirlygig beetle - on the surface making 's shape' movements and all. They are very common too. I guess really the only definite way is a picture (and then I guess that isn't always clear-cut').

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Old Thursday 3rd June 2004, 12:32   #8
Euan Buchan
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I want a pond but my parents dislike the idea I don't know why they don't want one its very important for wildlife.
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Old Thursday 3rd June 2004, 13:21   #9
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... Got a shovel in the shed, Euan? It's a moonlit night tonight...
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Old Thursday 3rd June 2004, 14:12   #10
Euan Buchan
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Mebe get some dianamite and when midnight strikes KABOOM har har
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Old Thursday 3rd June 2004, 20:41   #11
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Thanks for all the info

I think that Jorn is nearest as regards fly larvae.

They are about 5-7mm long have tubes that they use to put against the surface of the water. There are thousands of them which all dissapear when I go near(but I am trying not to take it personal) They seem to hang in this position for quite a time.

I have to say i have been amazed at the extra bit of something which the pond gives the garden. I tried in vain for numerous years to offer an attractive bird bath in all shapes size and in various places in the garden but it never really happened.

I am really pleased as the amount of birds which have used the pond to bathe and drink is staggering. the first bird I have seen using the pond was a siskin and from there on in it always seems to be used by numerous birds. the Starling young use it all day to bathe in so I do agree with people that say a wildlife garden is not quite right without a pond.

PS It's getting dark enough now Euan!!! PPS if it says ACME on the packet beware!!
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Old Thursday 3rd June 2004, 21:06   #12
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Mosquito / Gnat larvae maybe?

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Old Friday 4th June 2004, 06:41   #13
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Yep, that´s sounds like it
-these are clearly moskito larvae; if something comes near them from the surface they go into deeper water with a squiggly movement, as you describe; also the breathing tube at the rear end is characteristic.
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Old Friday 4th June 2004, 14:56   #14
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identification

For good indentification try the Field Studies Council guides, these ones are A4 sheets which fold up neatly. they have them for a range of animals and plants including a pond guide

http://www.field-studies-council.org...ons/index.aspx
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Old Wednesday 4th January 2006, 16:13   #15
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Rat tailed maggots are hoverfly larva. They breed in stagnant ponds as they breath through the long tail like tube. A helpful web site is WWW.smallpond.org.uk I found a few on google.
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Old Wednesday 4th January 2006, 17:02   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Euan Buchan
Mebe get some dianamite and when midnight strikes KABOOM har har
Hi Euan,
Tell them it`s a pond or an ear ring!
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