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Old Saturday 1st November 2008, 17:48   #1
Delia
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Badgers

I have a question for all the badger experts!
Are Badger Setts always associated with woodland? Or might they be located out in the open e.g ditches around arable fields?
Many thanks for any help
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Old Saturday 1st November 2008, 20:15   #2
gareth_blockley
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Generally i would say woodland and hedge banks are the 'classic' locations for a main sett. saying that though setts, especially smaller setts or single holes, can and do turn up anywhere.

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Old Sunday 2nd November 2008, 12:22   #3
Mike Richardson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delia View Post
I have a question for all the badger experts!
Are Badger Setts always associated with woodland? Or might they be located out in the open e.g ditches around arable fields?
Many thanks for any help
Regards Delia
I'm no expert, but I think badger sets can be found in almost any habitat (as long as it doesn't flood), although woodland is preferred.
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Old Monday 3rd November 2008, 08:13   #4
Farnboro John
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In quiet areas there are setts in the middle of open fields (there is one that has been on TV at least twice with Bill Oddie and Mike Dilger both scoring there) and in the Lake District there is at least one sett at about 1700 feet on open mountainside.

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Old Monday 3rd November 2008, 08:42   #5
Delia
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Thanks for the replies.
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Old Monday 3rd November 2008, 08:51   #6
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I was in an area of Derbyshire the other week with a couple of badger setts set into the edges of the moorland, quite some distance from any woodland. It seems as long as there's some soil with plenty of worms somewhere nearby they'll be fine.
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Old Monday 3rd November 2008, 08:53   #7
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Hi Delia,

I've certainly seen setts in open areas, although it is unusual. Gorse scrub is also a common location for badger setts here. There is a large sett in the gorse covered area in the photo below.
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Old Thursday 6th November 2008, 12:54   #8
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Badgers do prefer some cover around the sett entrance(s) but will definitely dig setts in fairly open positions if they feel like it. One sett I know is in a field right next to a large wood (there are several old, disused setts in the wood too). Why they chose that spot is hard to say but I think the local geology has a big part to play. Or they could just be doing it to confuse us
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Old Thursday 6th November 2008, 13:44   #9
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At a site in Co. Donegal there are two setts in open sand dune-grassland.
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Old Wednesday 12th November 2008, 10:40   #10
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badger in chernobyl forest

Good day.
Think that badger don't prefer open space, especially for excavation of living hole.
More over, in my investgation, I never meet the badger hole in open space.
I invite to look at the photo of badger that was made authomatic photo shooting.
http://www.chornobyl.in.ua/en/badger.htm
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Old Wednesday 12th November 2008, 16:49   #11
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There is a well populated sett at my place of work.
It is situated in a small copse fenced off from the factory with open fields on two sides.
The site used to be an old Manor house many years ago and has had Badgers there for as far back as anyone can remember.
The Badgers seem oblivious to the industry going on around them and keep to their old paths even breaking through the perimeter fencing.
Given that Badger Setts can be used for centuries it is possible that the area was originally woodland.
As a youngster in Berkshire I knew of a Sett on an open hillside but it was onvious from the old tree stumps that it was once heavily wooded
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Old Wednesday 12th November 2008, 17:08   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farnboro John View Post
In quiet areas there are setts in the middle of open fields (there is one that has been on TV at least twice with Bill Oddie and Mike Dilger both scoring there) and in the Lake District there is at least one sett at about 1700 feet on open mountainside.

John
Hi John

I have noticed that Badgers do like open fields and they are perturbed by doing exactly that - make their homes in an open space.

Hi Delia

While living at my last premises in Aberdeenshire (rural) I was lucky to see Badgers close up and personal.

The only definite set I knew about was close to where I lived (a 5 min walk from where I stayed). I have seen a set close up was in the middle of a cow field. There was a hillock in the centre of the cow field and that is where the Badgers resided. The set itself remained away from human eyes.

There was a sad story attached when one of the Badgers was run down on our country lane. I think it was someone who had no regard for wildlife and was speeding so that is how the Badger came to grief.

The local people where I stayed loved the fact there was a set nearby, and we all looked after it. The local farmer seemed very happy to have the set in his field so there was no problem at all. It was a talking point to all and sundry.

Since I have moved to England, I hope the the Badgers are still thriving. That is my biggest wish of all.

I hope this gives an idea Delia, as to what Badgers like as their home. and how they live.
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Old Sunday 28th December 2008, 16:12   #13
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Not to hijack the thread - but what are UK badgers like? I somehow have gotten the impression that not are they far more plentiful than in the U.S. but also.....smaller? less aggressive? Badgers here have quite the aggressive reputation, not sure if its deserved or not but I've been wondering if these are two different species?
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Old Sunday 28th December 2008, 16:30   #14
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I shouldn't be so lazy - I've tried to answer my own question...for the curious...
There are eight species of badger, in three subfamilies: Melinae (badgers of Europe and Asia – see links in species list below), Mellivorinae (the Ratel or honey badger), and Taxideinae (the American badger).

Although I found less info on any size or behavioral differences. I did note that the American badge was listed as eating gophers primarily whilst the UK's said earthworms.
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Old Tuesday 6th January 2009, 07:56   #15
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Although I found less info on any size or behavioral differences. I did note that the American badge was listed as eating gophers primarily whilst the UK's said earthworms.
http://www.badgers.org.uk/
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Old Wednesday 7th January 2009, 07:02   #16
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In Northumberland, I've seen setts in sand dunes, rough grassland, the banks of a small stream (with other entrances under a patch of gorse) and a steep sided bracken-covered valley; all a substantial distance from any woodland.

cheers
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