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delphinae

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Old Friday 10th August 2018, 11:07   #1
Taphrospilus
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delphinae

From Colibri delphinae (Lesson, 1839) we can fin OD here. In Mulsant & Verreux I found here:

Quote:
Lesson, Illust. Zool., t. II, (1832), pl. 64
Till know I failed to find a "Illustrations de zoologie, ou, Recueil de figures d'animaux peintes d'après nature Vol. II" and Vol I stopped at plate 60.

I ask as I am not 100% convinved on the entry:

Quote:
delphinae
Gr. myth. Delphinios, an epithet of the sun god Apollo (cf. L. Delphinus a starry constellation); the “Oiseau-mouche Delphine” of Lesson 1839 (Colibri).
Of couse the name could derive from there but the OD gives no hint on the etymology. Delphine seems to be a common name in France e.g. here or here:

Quote:
Delphine Gay ( aujourd'hui madame Emile de Girardin)
P.S. I see no relationship to her even if Lesson is mentioned on the same page.
P.P.S. And in the same publication he honored his child in Mino anais.

Last edited by Taphrospilus : Friday 10th August 2018 at 17:33.
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Old Yesterday, 18:05   #2
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Just a thought and therefore back again to this post. Here is what Lesson wrote about a plant name here.


Quote:
Delphinium de Delphin, dauphin, parce qu'avec son nectaire, on a cru trouver quelques ressemblance avec les figures des dauphins, telles que les ont imaginées les poétes. Le nom français de pied d'alouette, vient de la forme du nectaire comaré au long ergot du pouce des alouettes. Les Anglais le nomment aussi Lark' spur, éperon d'alouette.
I am sure people like Laurent are better in translating this text.
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Old Yesterday, 19:30   #3
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"Delphinium from Delphin, dolphin, because with its nectary, one thought to find some resemblance with the figures of the dolphins, as the poets imagined them. The French name pied d'alouette [= lark's foot], derives from the shape of the nectary, compared to the long spur of the thumb of larks. Englishmen name it as well Lark's spur, lark's spur."

...But I don't see any direct relation with the hummingbird.

FWIW, I would also expect delphinae to be derived from the name of a lady called Delphine.
(I.a., because of the feminine genitive ending in delphinae, and because of the French name he used. "Delphine" sounds too feminine to my ear to be construed as a reference to Apollo...)
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